The Andy Warhol Legacy Project & The Importance of Being Photographed at USF CAM

The Contemporary Art Museum Institute for Research Art in Tampa will be exhibiting two separate shows which include Andy Warhol, Tina Barney, Dawoud Bey, Katy Grannan, Jason Lazarus,Malerie Marder, Ryan McGinley, Catherine Opie, and Alec Soth

August 20 – December 15, 2012
USF Contemporary Art Museum

Genevieve Lykes Dimmitt Lobby Gallery and West Gallery

The Andy Warhol Legacy Project

The Andy Warhol Legacy Project is an exhibition of Polaroids and silver gelatin prints the USF Contemporary Art Museum received in 2008 as a gift from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts as part of the Andy Warhol Photographic Legacy Program. This important gift of 106 original Polaroid photographs and 50 gelatin silver prints consists of work produced by Warhol between 1970 and 1987. The portraits, celebrity snapshots, couples, nudes, painting ideas, party photos, still lifes, and outdoor scenes that make up the gift demonstrate the range of Warhol’s interests. The Polaroid portraits reveal the artist’s frank engagement with his subjects. The gelatin silver photographs demonstrate his compositional skill, his eye for detail, and his compulsive desire to document the time in which he lived. The collection at USFCAM consists primarily of works on paper, and this generous gift of work by one of the more significant artists of the 20th century acknowledges and advances the strengths of the collection.

Andy Warhol, Unidentified Woman #23 (Blonde Hair and Dog), 1986. Collection University of South Florida

Lee & Victor Leavengood Gallery

The Importance of Being Photographed

Anticipating the gaze of the camera is the subject of The Importance of Being Photographed. Taking its cue from a gift from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, this exhibition features a select grouping of contemporary photographers who create situations where the subject and the photographer engage in a dialogue about the nature of being photographed addressing issues of class, sexuality, sensuality, shame, despair, and privacy. The title of the exhibition is taken from Oscar Wilde’s funny and biting comedy, The Importance of Being Earnest, in which Wilde mixes mistaken identity with a polemic on economic stratification at the end of the of nineteenth century. The play and its famous title serve as a reference and backdrop for this exhibition that explores voyeurism, stratification, and celebrity in our contemporary times. Artists include:Tina Barney, Dawoud Bey, Katy Grannan, Jason Lazarus,Malerie Marder, Ryan McGinley, Catherine Opie, and Alec Soth. The Importance of Being Photographed is curated by Jane Simon, USFCAM Curator, and organized by the USF Contemporary Art Museum, Tampa.

Catherine Opie, Leon, 2008. Courtesy of the artist and Mitchell-­‐Innes & Nash, New
York

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Closed Sunday and University holidays.


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