Desireé Moore @ Tempus Projects

Cunsthaus is proud to present Bare Your Teeth, a site-specific installation by multidisciplinary artist Desireé

November 18, 2017 – January 5, 2018
Tempus Projects / Cunsthaus, Tampa

Working primarily in film and video, Moore (b. 1986, Indianapolis; lives in St. Petersburg, FL) explores the social complexities of gender, and specifically the cultural norms assigned to women and girls. She states, “Bare Your Teeth isolates moments of gesture to consider the feminine experience within culturally accepted sexism and harassment. In some ways, these tactics have been perpetuated into normalcy, a convenient disguise protected by civility. Benevolence is not a shield, and ignorance is not acceptable.” These issues are timely, as women continue to step forward publicly with stories of sexual abuse and harassment in Hollywood and the art world. The harassment is not new, but the widespread public acknowledgment of it is.

DESIREÉ MOORE
DESIREÉ MOORE :: BARE YOUR TEETH

Renowned author Margaret Atwood has stated,

“Men are afraid that women will laugh at them. Women are afraid that men will kill them.”

Through video and sculpture, Bare Your Teeth examines the power dynamics at work in women’s laughter and smiles, and the ways that the smallest gestures by a woman become sexualized.

Moore earnerd her MFA in 2013 from the University of South Florida and her BFA from Herron School of Art and Design in Indianapolis. Her video projects have been screened in group exhibitions across the country, including the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota as part of the three-venue Skyway: A Contemporary Collaboration. Moore is the recipient of a 2017 Creative Pinellas Emerging Artist Grant.

About Cunsthaus:
Cunsthaus was established in the spring of 2016 by fourteen women in the Tampa Bay Area with practices in education, visual art, music, curation, and writing. Sited next to artist-run gallery space Tempus Projects, established in 2009, Cunsthaus is further developing the Seminole Heights neighborhood as an arts destination. Offering unique exhibitions and events spanning a range of media and a varied survey of artists, Cunsthaus’ primary mission is to create a space for artistic expression, dialogue and reflection contributing to the arts community within the local neighborhood of Seminole Heights and the Tampa Bay region.

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1738298269523062/


Tempus Projects / Cunsthaus
4634 N Florida Ave, Tampa, FL 33603

Cunsthaus presents Pussy Riot Music Videos

In continuing efforts to provide engaging cultural programs and experiences through a collaborative and feminist curatorial perspective, Cunsthaus is proud to present a series of music video screenings by Russian artists and activists Pussy Riot opening on Friday, January 6th from 7-10pm. Admission is free but donations are encouraged. All contributions will be donated to Planned Parenthood.

Cunsthaus presents Pussy Riot

Known for their blend of radical performance and leftist ideals, Pussy Riot became the focus of international attention in 2012 as members Nadya Tolokonnikova, Masha Alyokhina and Yekaterina Samutsevich were arrested and jailed after performing an anti-Putin “punk prayer” in Moscow’s Christ the Saviour Cathedral. As Pussy Riot researcher Masha Gessen has written, “Pussy Riot are the first real dissidents of the Putin era, but like all dissidents they’re individual actors, perpetually out on a limb. Their actions have had dire but clear consequences, and in return for the hardships they’ve faced, they have received a voice and a mission.” Sonic Youth’s Thurston Moore has deemed Pussy Riot “One of the most important groups of our time.”

A vocal and active proponent of free speech in Russia, Pussy Riot has turned its attention to the United States, as evidenced by their most recent video “Make America Great Again” which will be screened at Cunsthaus. Also to be shown are the Russian-language video “Organs” with an English translation and “Straight Outta Vagina,” co-written with TV on the Radio’s Dave Sitek. Of this song, Tolokonnikova told The Guardian, “I believe the idea of powerful female sexuality is much bigger than any populist megalomaniac man.” These music videos epitomize the brash and brave energy of Pussy Riot, and further their role as international protesters. Cunsthaus has worked with Pussy Riot co-founder Nadya Tolokonnikova to secure permission for these screenings.

About CUNSTHAUS:

CUNSTHAUS was established in the spring of 2016 by fourteen women in the Tampa Bay-area with practices in education, visual art, music, curation, and writing. Sited next to artist-run gallery space Tempus Projects, established in 2009, CUNSTHAUS is further developing the Seminole Heights neighborhood as an arts destination. Offering unique exhibitions and events spanning a range of media and a varied survey of artists, CUNSTHAUS’ primary mission is to create a space for artistic expression, dialogue and reflection contributing to the arts community within the local neighborhood of Seminole Heights and the Tampa Bay region.

For more information:

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/223643824753371/

Tracy Midulla Reller,
TEMPUS PROJECTS Founder and Creative Director
www.tempus-projects.com
tempusprojects.art@gmail.com
813.340.9056

Olda Reviews: Art Getting to Work

St. Petersburg’s new Warehouse Arts District roughly spans 1st Ave N to 10th Ave S and 16th Street to 31st Street, which includes parts of the Grand Central district and the Dome Industrial Park is a working class neighborhood by nature.

If art neighborhoods were personified perhaps St. Petersburg’s 600 Block would be a skinny-jeans-and-Chucks hipster. Tampa’s Seminole Heights might be tweed jacketed; scruffy but mature. However, there is a new neighborhood you’d probably find in blue jeans and blue-collar: the Warehouse Arts District.

St. Petersburg’s new Warehouse Arts District roughly spans 1st Ave N to 10th Ave S and 16th Street to 31st Street. This area, which includes parts of the Grand Central district and the Dome Industrial Park is a working class neighborhood by nature. And it’s this aspect of “work” that is meant to set the neighborhood apart from the rest of St. Petersburg’s thriving art scene. The district’s slogan, “Where art is made”, is followed by the playful jab “not just shown and sold”.

True, half of a mile away the slick, graphic design anchored art of the 600 Block contrasts with the gritty forged and fire blown work of the Warehouses. However, don’t fret that this seeming rivalry is anything but beneficial to the art scene as a whole. Rather, this works well for St. Petersburg, diversifying its cultural offerings and using a competitive spirit to push standards higher.

Glass artist Duncan McClellan has had a fair share of attention lately with the establishment of St. Petersburg as a glass arts destination (thanks also to the permanent Chihuly collection and the Morean Arts Center’s Hot Shop). His new District studio/gallery, though, typifies the Warehouse Arts District rather well. The site is gritty but attractive, storied and hard-working. The gallery appeals to those searching out art, but also those curious about the production process. Similarly, the nearby St. Petersburg Clay Company draws people interested not only in the artwork but also learning the craft. The company’s Historic Seaboard Coastline Freight Depot building forms a connection between labor past and artisans laboring there presently.

The new neighborhood functions well independently with its consistent and inviting atmosphere as the same time complimenting the larger Bay area art scene.The Warehouse Arts District exhibits art and artists that the region proudly claims. However, it’s the hallmarks of work and education that proudly sets new neighborhood apart.

A good opportunity to explore the Warehouse Arts District is during St. Petersburg’s monthly 2nd Saturday Art Walk. Check out www.artwalkstpete.com for more information

Olda Reviews: Things Not Seen Before

Nearly 100 years after his birth and 20 years since his death John Cage’s relevancy to the current creative world is as strong as it’s ever been. To be sure, Tempus Projects’ Things Not Seen Before: A Tribute to John Cage isn’t so much an exhibit of work by Cage as it is a display of his continuing reach and influence.

The composer, writer, artist, and philosopher, John Cage has been among the foremost avant-garde artists of the second half of the 20th century. Curator, Jade Dellinger and artist run gallery, Tempus Projects bring Cage to Tampa as part of his centenary. The contrast is inevitable: the tiny garage art space and the avant-garde art giant. However, together they’ve compellingly fit the spirit of Cage into a little gallery in the Seminole Heights neighborhood of Tampa.

Theo Wujcik’s entrance/portrait of John Cage

To walk into the space I literally passed through John Cage: Tampa’s Theo Wujcik’s portrait of Cage which was cut into strips and hung as an appropriate entrance. Scattered on the walls (Dellinger honestly arranged the work by blindly throwing darts at the walls) is work created by, inspired by, and paying homage to John Cage. The content of the exhibit and its (dis)organization underscores the way Cage took the idea of play seriously and his fondness for chance. Even the records spun by the DJ in the corner reflected this with music across decades and genres, often substituting lyrics, with sexual moans and yelps.

Included in the exhibit’s additional programming was a disorienting and engaging “cine-performance” from filmmaker/artist Robbie Land. Seats were arranged to face Land and his cluttered table rather than the screen that his film was projected on (which was placed behind the audience). Beside Land was a close up projection of his equipment as he operated and manipulated it. Outside the gallery, the entire performance was projected on the side of a neighboring building. As soon as Land’s equipment whirred to life it faded to silence again. I thought the power had gone out. Rather, the spools of film that Land was manually turning seemed to power the entire set up. He started and stopped, sped up and slowed down the film shifting everyone’s focus from one screen to the next and keeping the subject of the artwork ambiguous. Land’s use (or misuse) of his projectors and mixers is reminiscent of the innovative way hip-hop artists hijacked turntables.

Among many others, art by Christian Marclay (guitar) and Andrew Deutsch (video)

Obviously, this exhibit ran the risk of being overly ambitious, of mismatching the work and the venue. Instead it brings a measure of intimacy not usually found with an artist or work with this level of acclaim. You have one last opportunity to view the exhibit. The closing reception for Tempus Projects’ Things Not Seen Before: A Tribute to John Cage and a performance of Wall Music by the USF School of Music will be held on Saturday 2/04 at 7pm.


This article is provided by Tampa Correspondent, Danny Olda, publisher of Art at Bay.
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