Andrea Dasha Reich: Flying Colors

Inspired by nature, Dasha Reich’s artworks are abstract interplays of organic shapes and rich-color spectrums that explore the deep intimacy of the world around us. In unique and unexpected ways they will surprise your senses and excite your imagination.

As Dominique Nahas, a New York art critic, wrote:

“The vision of Andrea Dasha Reich is embodied within multi-layered resin works that are hallucinatory amalgamations of an unusually vivid sort. Fresh and singularly inviting while remaining perpetually out of reach, Reich’s dreamscape engenders ecstatic universes brimming with potentiality.”

Opening Night Reception: March 4, 2016
Friday Evening, 5:30-8:30pm. Hors d’oeuvres, Pastries and Fine Wine

Show dates: March 5-April 1, Tuesday-Saturday, 11:00-5:00pm

Alfstad& Contemporary art space is located at 1419 5th Street,
Sarasota, Florida, 34236 in the Design District next to Lolita Tartine.

Cheyenne Rudolph at Ringling Underground

In recent years, functional ceramics, a medium often shunted into the category of craft, has been accepted into the vast world of contemporary art. The February Ringling Underground features three artists living in Florida and exploring the medium of clay. Jenn Ryan Miller, Sharon Norwood, and Cheyenne Rudolph use ceramics to explore various themes. Their diversity will provide the Ringling Underground audience with a multi-faceted view of contemporary ceramics being produced in Florida at current.

For the first installment of Ringling Underground on February 4, 2016, Cheyenne Rudolph will be performing Lemon-Aider. Cheyenne, who received her MFA in 2014 from University of Florida, is both a ceramicist and performance artist. Her performances utilize subversive functional ceramics to explore childlike assumptions about domesticity and cultural expectations. Cheyenne graciously agreed to participate in an interview to provide the Ringling Underground audience with context about her performance, Lemon-Aider.

Cheyenne Rudolph performing "Lemon-Aider"
Cheyenne Rudolph performing Lemon-Aider

Please describe the piece you will be performing at Ringling Underground on February 4.

The Lemon-Aider is an interactive mobile beverage cart, designed as a traveling performance piece to challenge the collective assumptions surrounding gender identity for women. A nostalgic lemonade stand, the Lemon-Aider is a operated by a caricatured retro housewife, whose good intentions are peppered with indecorous insinuations brought on by the mechanics of operating the juicing device. This is not your childhood lemonade stand.

Citrus Juicer Stand and Cup
Citrus Juicer Stand and Cup

Why did you choose this piece to perform, and what are you hoping from the Ringling Underground audience in terms of participation?

The Lemon-Aider is a friendly piece, highly approachable, and participants come away with a more intimate encounter. The piece is mobile and flexible in how I perform it, as I make lemonade from scratch for one individual at a time. It is more like a conversation with a character than a timed performance in front of a live studio audience. Participants may watch as I demonstrate, or they may interact with me as I make lemonade.

When did you begin combining your ceramics with performance art?

I have a background in theatre, studying it briefly in high school and undergraduate school. As the art objects I made became increasingly ambiguous and absurd in their functions, it was necessary to explain their use. The element of control is important in how I design the work, so it was natural for me to demonstrate, and to essentially take over the use of the objects, so that now, I am the only user. It has blossomed into an engaging way to design and make work.

Saturday Apron
Saturday Apron

Where does a piece begin, the ceramics or the concept for the performance?

Definitely the concept is primary. As I have learned to design for my own engagement, I am liberated from making pedestrian-friendly functional objects, so I think of them as actors or overstated props in the performance. I think about whether I will be performing live or through video, which helps in how I design the work. I also think about the installation and visual context of the piece; because it will be informed by its surroundings and my own interaction, the object no longer has to carry the full weight of the concept. I can, in a sense, magnify my visual concept to installation proportions, letting the backdrop, the video editing, or my own script, bring in subtext. I then make the object with my preliminary performance idea in mind. After the object is complete, the performance may go through a series of trials and refinements, and at times, I need to remake the object to better suit the performance needs.

Lemon-Aider in action
Lemon-Aider in action

What is the relationship between the ceramics and the performance elements of your art?

The objects instigate, or provide the implications of the performance, yet in their complicated design and retro aesthetic, they draw the viewer in. They are designed to be appealing, as is my own costume, yet while in use, they become a source of absurd subversion. I am picking apart and drawing attention to the expectations placed on me, personally, and on women of a particular type.

What type of influences motivate your art practice?

1950s/1960s kitchen products, Chindogu and infomercials of the 90s/00s, parodies and satire, old SNL skits, calling attention to conventionally accepted, yet unjust paradigms. Lucille Ball, Amy Sedaris, drag performers, theatre scenic design techniques and methods.

 


Ringling Underground is series of one night only events combining live music and experiential artworks in the Courtyard. The artwork is curated by Natalya Swanson and Shannon Fortner organizes the musical performances.

Ringling Underground is always free for college students with a valid college ID. It is an extension of the Art After 5 program held on Thursdays after 5 p.m. After hours discounted admission is $10 for adults; $5 for children 6-17, children 5 and under and Museum Members are free.

Cash bar provided by Modern Events at The Ringling.

Ringling Underground is a rain or shine event.
Share your Underground experiences on social media using the hashtag:#RinglingUnderground

SARTQ Print Party 2015

March 21, 2015
The Hub, Sarasota, FL

Sarasota’s Contemporary Artist Collective SARTQ announces Sixth Annual Print Party at the HuB

Sarasota’s Contemporary Artist Collective SARTQ announces Sixth Annual Print Party at the HuB

[March 9, 2015– Sarasota, Fl.] The newly reformed local artist collective SARTQ announces its sixth “Print Party,” an annual event that gives the public a chance to interact with both art and artists. This year’s party will serve as an introduction to SARTQ, its new members, mission, while raising funds for future exhibitions.

From 5 to 11 p.m. on Sat., March 21, SARTQ will hold its screen-printing party at the downtown “Creative Epicenter of Innovation” the HuB (1680 Fruitville Rd., Sarasota). SARTQ’s fifth print party in Sept. of 2011 drew nearly 1,000 people who brought shirts, skirts, placemats and everything in between to be screened live by the artists.

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“It is with the generous support of the community that SARTQ will be able to provide unique and engaging arts experiences. The upcoming event is another great opportunity for Sarasota to come out, meet the artists and enjoy a really fun evening for all ages.” says SARTQ co-founder, Tim Jaeger

Once again, each of the artists (4 previous members and 11 new members) have created an original design for the event. Attendees may bring their own clothing items such as t-shirts, pants, scarfs etc., though any item that can lie flat under the screen and will accept ink can be printed on. Choose your favorite design — or pick several! — and each print is just $5. The public is encouraged to be creative, with some particularly cute dog clothes, baby tees and handbags resulting from last year’s event. There will also be blank t-shirts on hand for purchase. This is a free, family friendly event.

SARTQ Print Party, 5-11 p.m., Sat., March 21, 5-11pm, The HuB, 1680 Fruitville Rd., Sarasota or sartq.org, FREE admission ($5 per print).

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ABOUT SARTQ

SARTQ, Sarasota’s local popular artist collective whose name underscores their connection to the region (a take-off on the area’s three letter airport code “SRQ”) was founded and formed in early 2008 by local artists Tim Jaeger and Joseph Arnegger under the observation that the Sarasota region boasted a large number of talented visual artists, yet only a small fraction were seen by the public, and the artist themselves were not actively engaged in dialogue and cooperation. Begun informally the collective quickly expanded and gained the attention of many local enthusiasts while exhibiting in multiple local rogue exhibitions and fairs including the SELECT Art Fair Art Basel Miami. After a brief two year hiatus, the now redesigned, 501 (c)3 aims to not only maintain a sustainable network of accomplished Sarasota/Manatee artists, manage an ambitious calendar of annual exhibitions and events, but also to create collaborations with local businesses, community, and performing arts organizations with a special effort to forge strong relationships with local schools. SARTQ events and exhibitions are suitable for all ages and accessible to everyone in the community. To read/view more about the resurgance of this organization visit: http://sartq.org/2015/03/resurgence-of-sartq/

SARTQ-banner

MISSION

SARTQ, A collective designed to maintain a sustainable network of artists which provide and enhance the facade of the local visual arts through the creation of unique art experiences and educational programming.

Based in Sarasota, FL, SARTQ engages the community through unique art experiences. In addition, the collective strives to: 1. Support the circle’s creative endeavors. 2. Produce roaming / temporary exhibitions. 3. Create educational opportunities in the community. 4. Reveal to the public how artists can function in society. 5. Create sustainable partnerships throughout the community that energize the visual arts and attract national attention to Sarasota’s legacy as a visual arts town.

For more information about SARTQ or how you can become involved with SARTQ please visit us on the web: www.sartq.org or get social with us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/sartq

Ringling Underground: March 5, 2015

Attendees of the March Ringling Underground will encounter three contemporary artists: Emily Elliott, Dustin Juengel, and Zach Gilliland. Artist Liaison Natalya Swanson spoke to each of them about their artwork and process:

 

Zach Gilliland: 

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Zach Gilliland

 

“I am constantly tinkering in the studio, trying new things, making new forms, honing my skills and dreaming up the impossible.  When I have an idea, I try it.  Not all approaches work, but I attempt everything and eventually the dots begin to connect.  The key, for me, is to simply be working.  As Picasso said, “inspiration exists but it has to find you working”.

I search for the simple and the organic as a jumping off point.  Then I find the subtle complexities that give the piece depth.  Once a project begins to take shape I send it to the moon and back, building it up and ripping it back apart.   This process is extremely important for me to filter out unnecessary information.
My work appears simple at first glance, but upon further inspection questions begin to arise.  Thats where, I feel, the magic lies.  My ultimate goal is to pull the viewer in from a distance, keep them looking up close and then leave them wondering when they turn away.”

Dustin Juengel:

Juengel, 2014 04 01 (abstract 01) 57-x57-
Dustin Juengel

 

“Painting offers a space to engage with different interests and negotiate experiences. I am not aware of an overarching agenda for my paintings, it’s too complex, I think it’s more of a search.

My recent works include grisaille oil paintings based on photographs. The limited palette allows me to focus on other aspects of technique, for example: modeling of form, economy of paint handling, and scale. The effects of light and the surrounding environment become more apparent on the gray surfaces, creating tension between the illusion of the depiction and the painting as an object in a specific location. I want the viewer to be able to enter into the painting and simultaneously become self-aware of standing in a place looking at this thing.”

Emily Elliott:

Emily Elliott
Emily Elliott

“My work is an exploration of emotional and psychological responses to human interaction and the desire for intimacy. I use the body as a metaphorical

battleground where the struggles of the mind take on a physical form. The figures are infected and transformed in reaction to their trauma. Each bump, scar, or mutation represents the fractured sense of self, torn between the desire to connect and need to protect oneself. I am interested in complicating those instincts, creating a dynamic energy between the push and pull of the psyche. This piece captures the moment before separation, where there is no clear victim or perpetrator. Instead they are both at once for and against each other.”

 

Flesh Tones: A Contemporary Painting Exhibition

February 23-27, 2015
Centre Gallery, USF Tampa

Paintings by Natalya Swanson and Daniel Miller with a closing reception on Friday, February 27, from 7-9pm.

Tampa, FL (February 2015) — From February 23-27, the Centre Gallery at the University of South Florida will host Flesh Tones by Natalya Swanson and Daniel Miller. There will be a closing reception on Friday, February 27, from 7-9pm.

Flesh Tones

Natalya Swanson graduated from the University of South Florida in 2009 with her Bachelors of Art in Art History. She currently lives and works in Sarasota, Florida where she is preparing for a career in Art Conservation.

Natalya’s paintings are an exploration of identity within art and society. She recreates famous artworks by pairing original compositional elements with contemporary imagery and figures. Through the transformative process, Natalya embeds personal beliefs on religion, sexuality, and selfhood within the works. Painting has become a form of meditation, where she visually interacts with her thoughts.

Daniel Miller graduated from Ringling College of Art & Design with a degree in Graphic and Interactive Communications. This will be his first showing of oil paintings. The collection of large scale genre scenes are an attempt to bring the viewer into Miller’s past, enveloping the viewer for their own happening experiences. Previous exhibits have included video art, printmaking, and graphic design. Miller is also part of the Sarasota Contemporary Arts Collective, SARTQ. More information can be obtained through the artist’s website, www.danielmiller.me.

Flesh Tones Exhibit View 2 Flesh Tones Exhibit View 1

For more information contact:

Tina Piracci, Art Director
Alyssa Cordero, Art Director
sa-centregallery@usf.edu
(813) 974-5464

About the Centre Gallery

Centre Gallery is an innovative, student-run art exhibition space at the University of South Florida. Located in the Marshall Student Center room 2700, Centre Gallery (www.centregallery.usf.edu) is free and open to the public. The gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.