“Ordinary Things” by Pamela Beck

I had never thought of the world this way before; never imagined that every day objects and activities could be beautiful, creative and/or thought provoking depending on the context in which they were presented and an individual’s intention. Artists know this intuitively; it’s what they do and how they live.

Pamela Beck

Pamela Beck

There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.


When I was younger I often used to write my shopping lists on pieces of sturdy tree bark I’d find in the woods. (Don’t roll your eyes; I had a lot more time on my hands back then and my sister was a hippie.) When my doorknobs looked empty, I’d paint them to resemble a design you might find on a Clarice Cliff teapot. Leftover pieces of colorful ribbon were curled around cans in the pantry; masses of flowers were hung upside down to dry from a ceiling rack in the laundry room so that it felt like I was folding clothing in Alice’s Wonderland.

This all started because I was lucky enough to take a trip to Paris with my family when I was fourteen. As I straggled behind them on one of our daily walking tours, I happened upon a storefront grocer’s window. There I saw a small wooden crate, about 12 x 12 inches, standing upright but slightly tilted back for the viewer to see its contents easily. It was divided into nine squares, three per row. Nine green pears were displayed in their individual cubbyholes, every fruit nestled in crisp lavender tissue paper that peaked out around each pear. It stopped me dead in my tracks. The ordinary made extraordinary.

I had never thought of the world this way before; never imagined that every day objects and activities could be beautiful, creative and/or thought provoking depending on the context in which they were presented and an individual’s intention. Artists know this intuitively; it’s what they do and how they live. But up until that Paris-pear moment, I had relegated these kinds of experiences to the galleries and museums my parents took us to and had not connected its relevance to my everyday world.

I was reminded of this vital life approach when I visited the Postal Art exhibition, “The Unexpected: Art in Transit” at Ringling College’s Basch Gallery, up until November 28th. Organized and installed by six Ringling students enrolled in Professor Mark Ormond’s course “Contemporary Art and Role of the Curator”, the show began as a call to artists from the International Union of Mail Artists, a few of whom are included in this show (http://iuoma-network.ning.com/). Time constraints turned this into a loan exhibition representing fifty artists, but primarily art from the collections of Sandra Lefever and Sarah Carter.

The Unexpected: Art in Transit, The Basch Gallery, Ringling College Academic Center

On display is the correspondence (the artwork itself) that has been mailed between the artists in this show over several years. Some are shown on the wall or on stands. The most interesting displays have the correspondence dangling in clear frames suspended in the air like mobiles, so that both sides of the Postal Art can be seen. This is a highly effective and beautiful reminder of the art-in-transit theme of this exhibition.

The Unexpected: Art in Transit, The Basch Gallery, Ringling College Academic Center

It’s fascinating and a bit unsettling to view the private exchanges between the artists; it can feel like you’ve stumbled upon someone’s secrets but can’t look away. (Excluding the theme of ‘Save the USPS” which was a common thread.) Usually the artwork made by Postal Artists, is seen only by the sender and receiver. But the show’s curator/team leader, Van Jazmin, describes the public display of this artist to artist work as a “progressive step for Postal Art, ” usually considered somewhat of a “relatively underground movement in response to the Fluxus movement.”

http://www.behance.net/gallery/Fluxus-Manifesto/5136121
http://www.behance.net/gallery/Fluxus-Manifesto/5136121

A letter, a pear, just everyday things… it all depends on what you do with them.

Exhibition info:
-The Basch Gallery, Ringling College Academic Center, 2363 Bradenton Road, Sarasota

The Unexpected: Art in Transit Team: Curator/Team Leader, Van Jazmin; Registrar, Cindy Cherng; Graphic Designer, Kasia Dybek; Editor/Assistant for PR, Jordon Stone; Event organizer, Lauren Burger; Press Correspondent, Andrew Angstadt

Q & A with Sandra Lefever, Nov 14th, 4-6 PM,

Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/440169886019040/?fref=ts


To read more about Pamela, view these links:
http://srxq.blogspot.com/
http://whatdogsreallythink.blogspot.com/

Clothesline Presents – Process Obsessed

June 8 – June 23, 2012
With the refinement of traditional processes or discovery of new techniques, Process Obsessed explores the methods behind printmaking, prompting the question: what is a print? Although the content of each artist differs, the process and methods unifies these practitioners and is a testament to the constantly varied, yet innovative approach brought into printmaking.

June 8 – June 23, 2012
Clothesline Gallery

Featuring Sarasota artists Christopher Schumaker, Cody Berringer, Sandra Lefever, Fabian Manzano, Mike Adno, Austin Kowal, David Troxell, and Keith Alvarado, the exhibition reveals the technically versatile and range of printmaking through intaglio, linocut, woodcut and silkscreen printing.

Throughout history, artists have sought new and innovative ways to translate images and narratives through processes. Process Obsessed presents the evolution of printmaking through processes traditional and contemporary.

Clothesline Gallery

With the refinement of traditional processes or discovery of new techniques, Process Obsessed explores the methods behind printmaking, prompting the question: what is a print? Although the content of each artist differs, the process and methods unifies these practitioners and is a testament to the constantly varied, yet innovative approach brought into printmaking.

Admission to the exhibition is free. The opening reception on Friday, June 8th will feature appetizers and an open bar.

After the reception, view the exhibit during regular gallery hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 12 noon – 4 p.m., and 6 p.m. – 8 p.m.


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Clothesline Gallery Presents: WELCOME

Saturday, March 31st, 2012
Spring of 2012 marks the official launch of the new and improved Clothesline Boutique + Gallery. Located on the south side of the historic Burns Court District, Clothesline showcases the best of SRQ in screen printing, fine art, illustration, and design.

Saturday, March 31st, 2012
Clothesline, 529 S. Pineapple Ave., Sarasota, FL

Spring of 2012 marks the official launch of the new and improved Clothesline Boutique + Gallery. Located on the south side of the historic Burns Court District, Clothesline showcases the best of SRQ in screen printing, fine art, illustration, and design.

clothesline
Clothesline Presents WELCOME

Group exhibition featuring local artists including:

Anita Wexler
Matt Coombs
Brian Marsden
Coralette Damme
Matt Decker
Demeree
Chris Schumaker
Darcy Little
Matt Deterior
Grace Elizabeth Betts
Gregory Dirr
Hunter Slade
Jesse Valore
Max Gardner
Nate Rothenberger
Sandra Lefever
Vincent Nappi
Wesley Lock

The event is open to the public between 5 and 9pm.

Live music by The Buffalo Wizards and the Send-Offs. Live art by Third Eye Projections. Food and beverage graciously provided by Bond Restaurant.