OPEN SCORE, a new exhibition at USF CAM

January 18 – March 9, 2013
USF Contemporary Art Museum, Tampa, FL

With its emphasis on the technological aspects of new media, this exhibit examines the possibilities that technologies offer as tools for the poetic transformation of reality and the approach to forms of expression in art and daily life.

January 18 – March 9, 2013
USF Contemporary Art Museum, Tampa, FL

Open Score pays homage to artist Robert Rauschenberg’s groundbreaking performance art presentation titled 9 Evenings: Theatre and Engineering, held in 1966 at the Armory in New York City. In that performance (organized by Rauschenberg and Billy Klüver, a research scientist at Bell Labs in Murry Hill, NJ), 10 artists worked with 30 engineers and scientists from the Bell Laboratories to create a series of groundbreaking performances that incorporated new technology. They used video projection, wireless sound transmission, and Doppler sonar technologies considered ordinary today but that had never been seen in the art of the 1960s. These events united artists and scientists in the use of new technology and invited new artistic forms. Open Score, with its emphasis on the technological aspects of new media, examines the possibilities that these technologies offer as tools for the poetic transformation of reality and the approach to forms of expression in art and daily life. The exhibition, with its compelling interactive works suitable for a wide range of ages and demographics, promotes the development of visual literacy in our image and technology-dense culture; deals with issues of collective authorship and civic participation; and encourages a questioning of those power, control and social levels that technology produces despite its attempts at democratization.

Bill Vorn, Hysterical Machine, 2006
Bill Vorn, Hysterical Machine, 2006

Featuring the art of an array of distinguished international artists, the works take the form of participatory installations, videos, sculpture and projections. Open Score was first exhibited at the 11th Havana Biennale (May­June 2012) and was curated and organized by artist Luis Gómez and curator Dannys Montes de Oca, who are collaborating with Noel Smith, IRA Curator of Latin American and Caribbean Art, to create and organize an edition of the exhibition for the USFCAM. The roster of multicultural artists whose work will be featured includes: Ingrid Bachmann (Canada); Patricia Clark (USA); Luis Gómez (Cuba); Antonio Gómez Margolles (Cuba);
Camilo Martínez and Gabriel Zea (Colombia-Argentina); Barry Moon (Australia); Levi Orta (Cuba); Mariano Sardón (Argentina); and Bill Vorn (Canada).

Ingrid Bachmann, Pinocchio's Dilemma, 2007
Ingrid Bachmann, Pinocchio’s Dilemma, 2007

Selected works from the exhibition include Alt Control, a participatory work by a collective composed of Clark, Gómez and Moon, that considers the ways in which information about art is made available on the web. They have created an interactive program that invites viewers to recreate the work of famous artists while controlling, restricting and surveilling their participation. Other works include those by Bill Vorn, a pioneer in the Aesthetics of Artificial Behaviors, who will present Hysterical Machines, robotic devices with pyroelectric sensors that allow them to detect and react to the presence of viewers in the gallery. Patricia Clark’s Malecón is a seven-channel video that documents the changes to Havana’s famed seawall over the course of 14 years. Ingrid Bachmann’s Pinocchio’s Dilemma features a row of candy-colored tongues that wag at the viewer’s approach, while a nose-like protuberance grows from an opposing wall, with his or her every movement. Camilo Martínez and Gabriel Zea’s Dispenser of Values is a typewriter attached to a computer, that viewers must hand crank in order to generate a print (which they can keep), whose value is associated with the amount of labor needed to produce it.

RELATED EVENTS ­ All events are free and open to the public

OPENING NIGHT – January 18
A Conversation with Open Score Curators and Artists, 6pm
Barness Recital Hall / MUS107, USF School of Music
Join curators and artists from Open Score for a conversation about the exhibition and their work.

Reception follows 7­9pm, USF Contemporary Art Museum
Celebrate the exhibition with the curators and artists.

CURATOR’S TOUR
February 28, 12pm,USFCAM
Visit CAM on your lunch break for a free, guided tour of Open Score with IRA Curator Noel Smith.

3821 USF Holly Drive, Tampa, FL 33620 / (813) 974-4133

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Graphicstudio’s 14th Annual Benefit Sale

Friday, October 12, 2012
GRAPHICSTUDIO, Tampa, FL

Hundreds of original, artist-signed, fine art prints and sculpture multiples are available at discounts from 10-60% off the regular list price. All sales benefit Graphicstudio¹s artists¹ residencies, continuing research and educational programming.

Friday, October 12, 2012
GRAPHICSTUDIO, Tampa, FL

10am – 9pm | Sale (6pm ­Reception)

The Graphicstudio Benefit Sale is a one-day-only event that will take place on Friday, October 12, 2012. Hundreds of original, artist-signed, fine art prints and sculpture multiples are available at discounts from 10-60% off the regular list price. All sales benefit Graphicstudio’s artists’ residencies, continuing research and educational programming. This once a year event includes work from world-renowned artists including Los Carpinteros, Chuck Close, Lesley Dill, Alex Katz, Robert Mapplethorpe, Christian Marclay, Vik Muniz, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Ed Ruscha, Janaina Tschäpe, William Wegman, and many others. There will be a FREE drawing at 8pm for St. Petersburg artist Robert Stackhouse’s Blue 5606!

Philip Pearlstein, View of Rome, 1986, Direct gravure/aquatint with roulette work, 41 ½” x 52”, Edition: 60, Images courtesy of Graphicstudio/USF, Photo Credit: Will Lytch

Some prints are the last available in inventory, with just one impression remaining. Techniques include traditional hand-printing processes such as relief, etching, photogravure, and lithography; digital printmaking; and technically advanced sculpture fabrication methods. Subject matter ranges from portrait to still life, representational to abstract, and all sizes Something for everyone at one-day-only prices. This event is free and open to the public. All major credit cards accepted, and all sales must be completed the day of the sale! Save the date: October 12th! Do you want to begin a collection of works by major contemporary artists, or maybe expand your current collection? Even if you just want to be an art collector one day a year! This is it! You don¹t want to miss the 14th Annual Graphicstudio Benefit Sale!

Please contact Kristin Soderqvist, Director of Sales and Marketing, for more information at (813) 974-5871 or at kristins@arts.usf.edu

About Graphicstudio

Graphicstudio is a university-based atelier engaged in a unique experiment in art and education. Founded in 1968 as a non-profit art making facility, Graphicstudio is committed to research and the application of traditional and new techniques for the production of limited edition prints and sculpture multiples.

James Rosenquist, Robert Rauschenberg, Ed Ruscha, Vik Muniz, Kiki Smith and other leading contemporary artists have been invited to work in collaboration with expert artisans in our studios to create works on paper and editions of sculptures in a variety of materials. Ongoing research by Graphicstudio has been remarkably productive and many new processes and treatments of traditional methods have been developed such as waxtype (encaustic screen printing) and heliorelief (a photographic woodblock process). Graphicstudio editions have been acquired by leading museums including the Museum of Modern Art, the New York Public Library and the Whitney Museum of American Art. The National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and the USF Contemporary Art Museum maintain complete archives of Graphicstudio editions. Graphicstudio also offers a Subscription Program.

Graphicstudio with the Contemporary Art Museum and the Public Art Program form the Institute for Research in Art in the College of The Arts at the University of South Florida.

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/graphicstudio/
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/graphicstudiofl/
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/irausf
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/irausf

GRAPHICSTUDIO | Institute for Research in Art
3702 Spectrum Boulevard,Suite 100
Tampa, Florida 33612
Info Line: (813) 974-3503 / fax: (813) 974-2579
www.graphicstudio.usf.edu


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Taking Imagination Seriously – Janet Echelman visits SMOA

Janet Echelman is an artist who works mainly with commissioned pieces. She approaches her work as a challenge or problem to be solved and also says that she will only accept an invitation to create work if she feels it can truly better herself and the community that would interact with it.

In addition to its fundraising efforts, the Sarasota Museum of Art continues its tradition of arts programming this year with ARTmuse – a series of invitational events for donors that offer talks and demonstrations by acclaimed visiting artists and curators.


by Jen Nugent

Janet Echelman is an artist who works mainly with commissioned pieces. She approaches her work as a challenge or problem to be solved and also says that she will only accept an invitation to create work if she feels it can truly better herself and the community that would interact with it. Her large outdoor sculptures “shape urban airspace, creating permanent, voluptuous, billowing forms, that are counterpoint to hard edged buildings in the urban environment.”

Janet Echelman at SMOA (Photo Credit: Aleksandr V.Gleyzer, WSLR)
Janet Echelman at SMOA (Photo Credit: Aleksandr V.Gleyzer, WSLR)

Echelman’s modest personality presents itself by way of her recollection of when a professor at Harvard had advised her not to pursue art. She claims that she was not what you would call a “talented artist.” Although later, she proudly admits that her first solo show was at the age of 23 and curated by none other than Robert Rauschenberg, who also bought three of her early paintings for his private collection.

Instead of attending graduate school, Echelman spend some years traveling throughout Asia and she spent some time in India on a Fulbright scholarship, which is where she first began working with netting. She was set to have a large painting exhibition, but her paints never arrived. Attracted to the fishing nets she watched on her evening walks, she enlisted the local fishermen to build a net in her desired shape. “In the worst moment of horrible pressure and anxiety, comes the moment of discovery”, she says. These early sculptures are of a more modest size than those adorning airports and cityscapes today. She also says that as she held them up with poles on the beach, “the wind (began) to interact with them and created a mesmerizing movement which I didn’t expect”, which consequently led her to installing them in the air.

Janet Echelman
Larry Thompson, Janet Echelman, Wendy Surkis (Photo Credit: Aleksandr V.Gleyzer, WSLR)

In 2010, Echelman was commissioned by the Biennial of the Americas to build a sculpture that could celebrate the “interconnectedness” of the 35 nations included in the Western Hemisphere. After seeing a video of the tsunami that occurred as a result of the earthquake in Chile, she realized that the “ripple” of the ocean connected not only the Western Hemisphere, but also the entire globe. The artist, along with a team of professionals, acquired data from both NASA and NOAA, built a 3D model of the tsunami and eventually translated the information into a unique “areal lace installation” that is currently traveling the world. The title “Tsunami 1.26” refers to the milliseconds lost in the rotation of the earth from the earthquake. Echelman also uses a fiber called Spectra®, which is actually a type of plastic that can act like a fiber so it retains the soft and fluid movement that attracts the artist, but is also stronger than steel and is resistant to moisture, salt and pollution. Apparently, these installations can survive both a blizzard and a hurricane.

Janet Echelman
(Photo Credit: Aleksandr V.Gleyzer, WSLR)

Janet Echelman is an internationally recognized Harvard graduate, a 2010-2011 recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship in the Fine Arts, and recently gave a TED talk about her work. Echelman was invited to Sarasota to speak as part of a series of artist lectures at the future home of the Sarasota Museum of Art.

Watch Janet Echelman on TED Talks: http://www.ted.com/talks/janet_echelman.html.

You can also view more about her by visiting her website: http://www.echelman.com/

Artists Who Made Sarasota Famous & The Story of the Sarasota Art Association

JANUARY 19, 2012 – March 10, 2012
Recognizing over 40 artists who established Art Center Sarasota as a dynamic and vital community art center, and chronicling the Art Association’s formative years through photography and unique memorabilia.

JANUARY 19, 2012 – March 10, 2012
Art Center Sarasota

Judy Axe in ACS galleries 1950s

Artists That Made Sarasota Famous exhibition will be on display in the Center’s Gallery One, recognizing over 40 artists who established Art Center Sarasota as a dynamic and vital community art center. These creative pioneers were the artistic force responsible for putting Sarasota on the map as one of Florida’s most vibrant cultural destinations. The exhibition offers a rich sampling of works by artists who settled into Sarasota and were active in the Sarasota Art Association during its early heyday. These works are on loan from the artists, their families, and local collectors. Among the varied subjects are portraits, landscapes, still life, non-representational and circus themes.

LBK Bridge - 1950s plein air classes instructor Robert Chase

The legacy of early Sarasota artists John Armstrong, Jack Cartlidge, Julio De Diego, Jerry Farnsworth, William Hartman, George Kaiser, Robert Larson, Hilton and Dorothy Leech, Frank Rampolla, Guy Saunders, Syd Solomon, Eric von Schmidt, Ben Stahl and others will be honored. Many of the artists on exhibit still reside in the Sarasota area today, including Beth Arthur, Judy Axe, Robert Chase, Fiore Custode, George Fox, Marty Hartman, Roy Nichols, Craig Rubadoux and Jan Silberstein.

Sarasota Art Association -Today' Art Center Sarasota 1964

The Story of the Sarasota Art Association 1926 – 1966 (today’s Art Center Sarasota) exhibition on display in the Center’s Gallery Two chronicles the Art Association’s formative years through photography and unique memorabilia. The focus of the exhibition is to tell the story of the vital connection between Sarasota’s Community Art Center, the artists’ community, the Ringling School of Art (today’s Ringling College of Art and Design), the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art and the Sarasota community, providing insight into the sensibility of the time. This exhibition will feature a series of bold and richly illustrated graphic displays telling Art Center Sarasota’s colorful story from its inception in 1926 through 1966. The exhibition includes an illustrated historical timeline and accompanying photographs. These exhibitions pay tribute to Art Center Sarasota’s success and spirit while celebrating its past achievements.

Sarasota Art Association- today's Art Center Sarasota -Original Building 1950s

This exhibition is curated by Heidi Anderson Connor, and co-curated by Mark Ormond. Connor is a certified archivist and Historical Collections Manager. She is a freelance archivist working with the Sarasota County History Center and the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art. She studied at Ringling College of Art & Design in the 70s, and spent 12 years as assistant to the American sculptor John Chamberlain. Connor was the Curator/Archivist for the Museum of Television and Radio exhibition, The Gentleman Giant: Leonard H. Goldenson, and the executor of the estate of artist David Budd. She completed her graduate work at USF and has a BFA from Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, FL.

logo Art Center Sarasota

Mark Ormond is currently the Curator of Exhibitions for Ringling College of Art and Design, has over 30 years of experience in the art world, and has organized, coordinated, designed and installed numerous museum exhibitions. Ormond has also edited, authored and contributed to many brochures, catalogues and publications on artists including Robert Rauschenberg, Francesco Clemente, Robert Thiele and Yayoi Kusama. He has held positions at the Miami Art Museum, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. As an independent curator, author, lecturer and consultant since 1999, Ormond remains engaged in a broad range of contemporary art projects.

Josef Albers: Color

October 1, 2011 – January 16, 2012
An installation of color studies which reflect Albers’ investigations into how colors interact with and alter one another when placed together.

October 1, 2011 – January 16, 2012
The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

Josef Albers (1888-1976) was one of the most influential art educators of the 20th century. During the 1920s, first as a student and later as a professor at the famed German school of art and design, the Bauhaus, Albers began formulating his theories about technique and art instruction that would later influence an impressive lineage of students including Robert Rauschenberg, Cy Twombly, Ray Johnson, Susan Weil, Richard Anuszkiewicz and Eva Hesse – a veritable “Who’s Who” of mid-century American modernism.

Josef Albers. Homage to the Square, Screen Print. Gift of Mrs. Robert Feitz, in memory of her husband.

This installation of Albers’ work is comprised of color studies which reflect his investigations into how colors interact with and alter one another when placed together. These experiments provided the foundation for his courses in color theory. On view are examples which restrict his visual vocabulary to the most basic of geometric forms, the rectangle and the square. In doing so, Albers frees us from the distractions of objective recognition allowing for an unrestricted contemplation of his primary concern—the properties of color.