Season of Sculpture, Season VII presents “Shared Ground: Eight Artists-Eighteen Installations” by Pamela Beck

This year, Season of Sculpture presents Season VII’s “Shared Ground: Eight Artists, Eighteen Installations.” Eight highly acclaimed artists of regional, national and international renown, will exhibit eighteen large-scale works throughout Sarasota’s beautiful downtown Bayfront Park from November 16, 2013 through May 2014.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.

Many of us have memories of climbing over outdoor sculpture as children; we were free to explore and react to the look, sense and impact of a work of art in its ever-changing natural surroundings. Free from the encumbrances of traditional indoor settings, we experienced art in a fresh and approachable way; sometimes serious, sometimes playful, but always visceral and untethered from rules of art protocol and gallery decorum.

If we were lucky, this was our introduction to sculpture- to be fully engaged, curious and physically interactive without restrictions; and this is exactly the opportunity Season of Sculpture offers to newcomers and established fans alike over the course of the next six months.

Season of Sculpture is a local not for profit, 5O1 [c] 3 organization that produces a biennial, international exhibition of large-scale sculptures along Sarasota’s bay front. It’s free and open to the public 24/7. Their mission is to enrich the cultural and educational experience of residents and visitors. The organization relies on donors, sponsors, volunteers and artists to bring these nationally acclaimed, international invitational exhibitions to Sarasota.

This year, Season of Sculpture presents Season VII’s “Shared Ground: Eight Artists, Eighteen Installations.” Eight highly acclaimed artists of regional, national and international renown, will exhibit eighteen large-scale works throughout Sarasota’s beautiful downtown Bayfront Park from November 16, 2013 through May 2014.

“Shared Ground,” curated by Fayanne Hayes and Andrew Maass, presents sculpture by Heinz Aeschlimann, Hans Van de Bovenkamp, Robert Chambers, Richard Herzog, Linda Howard, Jun Kaneko, Jae-Hyo Lee, and Boaz Vaadia. Docent-led tours will be offered, as well as public and student educational programs.

A satellite exhibition of the artists’ smaller works will be exhibited at the Sarasota Herald-Tribune building at 1741 Main Street in downtown Sarasota from January 7th through May 3Oth, 2014.
As the director of public relations for Season of Sculpture, I’ve had the opportunity to ask the artists about their work. A series of brief interviews with them will appear in this column, starting with Boaz Vaadia.

2OO8 Bronze, boulder & bluestone 86"h. x 12O"w. x 8O" d. A/P, Ed. of 5
Asa, & Yeshoshafat with Dog, 2OO8
Bronze, boulder & bluestone
86″h. x 12O”w. x 8O” d.
A/P, Ed. of 5

 

2O13 Bronze & bluestone 91"h. x 36" w. x 36" d. 2/5, Ed. of 5
David, 2O13
Bronze & bluestone
91″h. x 36″ w. x 36″ d.
2/5, Ed. of 5

Boaz Vaadia Bio:

Vaadia was born in Gat Rimon, Israel in 1951; He was a self-taught artist until he could afford to attend the Avai Institute of Fine Arts, from which he graduated in 1971. He taught himself welding and stone masonry and built his first casting foundry for bronze following his graduation.

In 1975, he was awarded his first, of two, American-Israel Cultural Foundation grants to study in the US, where he has lived and worked ever since, in New York City.

Vaadia’s unique sculptures, either in bronze or stacked bluestone slate, evoke his Israeli heritage in a meditative, contemporary, yet sensual style. His work is permanently sited in numerous public collections, as well as museums and private collections throughout the U.S. including: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Museum; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; the Time Warner Center, NYC; The Ravinia Sculpture Park, Chicago; the Independence Park, Tel Aviv; and The Philharmonic Center for the Arts, Naples, FL.

PB: How long did you think about this sculpture before working on it?
BV: Most of my sculptures take several years of thought and study before I begin carving.

PB: Who/what are some of your influences, artistically or otherwise?
BV: Mainly ancient stonework, but also sculptors like Michelangelo, Noguchi, and Giacometti.

2OO9 Bronze, boulder, & bluestone 76" h. x 12O" w. x 1OO " d. 1/5, Ed. of 5
Family with Dog, 2OO9
Bronze, boulder, & bluestone
76″ h. x 12O” w. x 1OO ” d.
1/5, Ed. of 5

PB: How do you anticipate that your sculpture will look different in the bay front setting?
BV: As my work is layered I believe it will connect well with the environment, looking as though carved by winds from the bay.

PB: What made you choose to do a work of this size?
BV: My work is based on the human scale, allowing viewers to interact with it in a more personal way. The natural materials I work with also help determine the size of my work.

PB: What is your favorite hobby or pastime other than your art?
BV: Meditation and spiritual studies.

2O13 Bronze, basalt & bluestone 65"h. x 9O"w. x 8O" d.
Maaka & Revaham, 2O13
Bronze, basalt & bluestone
65″h. x 9O”w. x 8O” d.

website:
http://sarasotaseasonofsculpture.org/

Contact:
SusanMcleod@michaelsaunders.com

Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela is Public Relations Director for Season of Sculpture and a private art consultant. She co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings, drawings and sculpture at Sotheby’s. She was Communications Director for The Essential Element. Pamela has a keen interest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old. Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee and Institute for the Ages Volunteer.

“Could an Artist Have Anything in Common with A-Rod?” by Pamela Beck

What if Artists took Steroids? Join Pamela Beck in her column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.

Recently I read a provocative article inspired by the deluge of baseball-steroid shenanigans entitled: “What if Novelists Took Steroids?”*

Alex Rodriguez bats in a game on April 19, 2008 courtesy of Keith Allison.
Alex Rodriguez bats in a game on April 19, 2008 courtesy of Keith Allison.

The writer wonders would he, too, indulge if the results were superpower skills that allowed him to leap to the best-seller list faster than a speeding bullet?  If his stories could flow like water and his fingers could grow extra-muscular to better attack the keyboard with stamina and zeal—would he be able to resist the temptation to pop that pill?

While this falls in to the category of “What I’ll Do When I Win the 45O Million Dollar Powerball,” you have to admit that the pill-popping question intrigues and makes you silently consider your ethical stance.

Le Penseur, (The Thinker), Auguste Rodin (1840-1917)
Le Penseur, (The Thinker), Auguste Rodin (1840-1917)

As an artist, the consequences could be extraordinary.  What if by taking such a pill, original ideas would frequently appear to you along with the technical mastery to produce them?  What if the results would be met with international acclaim? What if there was a shortcut to creating satisfying work and your motivated hands would work forcefully and successfully to paint, sculpt, or fabricate the best ideas you’ve ever come up with?  Would you be able to resist the temptation for that new little chaser with your morning coffee?  You could take that pill secretly.

It’s hard to say if you’d develop affection for a fantasy capsule that’s accompanied by a solo show of your work at the Guggenheim Museum.  The writer of the article cited says, “Cheaters always know how it’s going to end. That’s why they become liars too.”

What hand would you play…if no one were watching?

Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings at Sotheby’s. Perhaps it’s not surprising that she is also a psychotherapist. She has a keen interest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old. Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee and Institute for the Ages Volunteer.

*http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/11/opinion/sunday/what-if-novelists-took-steroids.html?_r=0

ArtDart: On the Waterfront by Pamela Beck

There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in the second installment of, SeeSaw, to her current column, ARTdart, as she observes and explores various visual art exhibitions and happenings in the Gulf Coast area.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in the second installment of, SeeSaw, to her current column, ARTdart, as she observes and explores various visual art exhibitions and happenings in the Gulf Coast area.

“My most successful relationship has been with water,” a newly single artist recently told me.
I laughed.
“I know that sounds funny, “ he continued, “but we’ve been together forever and it’s the only influence I’ll let dominate me; or at least the only one I’ll admit to,” he added with a devilish smile.
That’s what makes horse races; but seriously, nobody with a beating heart can live in Sarasota and not be affected by the pervasive presence of water.
In the conversations I have with local artists, water is often mentioned as a favorite muse. Whether referenced for its beauty, power, mystery or ever-changing properties, water leaves an indelible mark.
Here’s a sampler of what I SeeSaw around town:

 

Susan Zukowsky
Missing Girl, 2OO3
Mixed media collage: appropriated paper images, rubber ball, wire, glass beads, thread
2O 1/2 x 18 1/2 inches
Jack Dowd’s 27 & Susan Zukowsky
Selby Gallery, Sarasota FL, 34234

Bruce Marsh
Bay Light
Oil on canvas
60 x 65 inches

Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art
1288 N. Palm Ave.
Sarasota, FL 34236

 

 
Irene Gorman
Sarasota Journal
Collage

Florida Flavor
Art Center Sarasota
707 North Tamiami Trail
Sarasota, FL 34236

 

Arnold Desamarais
The Quiet Calm
oil on panel, 2011
18 x 24 inches

Stakenborg Fine Art
1545 Main Street
Sarasota, Fl. 34239
 
Maro Lorimer Old Florida acrylic on gallery wrapped canvas 36 x 24 inches
Maro Lorimer
Old Florida
acrylic on canvas
36 x 24 inches

Art Uptown
1367 Main St
Sarasota, FL 34236
 
 
 

Beatrice del Perugia
Siesta Gold
acrylic on canvas
18″ x 18″, framed 22″ x 22″

Dabbert Gallery
76 S. Palm Ave.
Sarasota, FL 34236

 

 
 
Sigrid Olsen
Marina Magic
mixed media
14 x 17 inches framed

Sigrid Olsen Art
4O7 S. Pineapple Ave.
Sarasota, FL, 34236

 

Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings at Sotheby’s. Perhaps it’s not surprising that she is also a psychotherapist. She has a keen interest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old. Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee and Institute for the Ages Volunteer.

Craig Rubadoux Interview by Pamela Beck

Craig Rubadoux has participated in over seventy exhibitions. Solo exhibitions have included the Ringling Museum of Art, the Fort Lauderdale Museum of Art, the Lowe Museum of Art, and the Cornell Fine Arts Museum. His art is included in many public and private collections including the Guggenheim Museum, New York; the High Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale; the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, Florida; and the State of Florida. He is currently represented by Dabbert Gallery in Sarasota, Florida.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.

Craig Rubadoux has participated in over seventy exhibitions.  Solo exhibitions have included the Ringling Museum of Art, the Fort Lauderdale Museum of Art, the Lowe Museum of Art, and the Cornell Fine Arts Museum.  His art is included in many public and private collections including the Guggenheim Museum, New York; the High Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale; the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, Florida; and the State of Florida. He is currently represented by Dabbert Gallery in Sarasota, Florida.

In the mid-twentieth century there was an active group of artists and illustrators including Craig Rubadoux, Ben Stahl and Syd Solomon among others, who lived and worked in Sarasota. They garnered both local and national attention and furthered Sarasota’s reputation as a thriving art community.

Craig Rubadoux still lives in this area and also has a seasonal studio in Nova Scotia. His home here is hidden away at the end of a dirt road. It’s nestled in the trees overlooking a bay. Inside, the walls are completely covered with art made by himself, his friends and other artists he admires. Fascinating books, adorable pets and music fill the house. His studio, surrounded by private land and fronted by the bay, is a huge screen porch that opens to the breeze on three sides.

In this setting, Pamela Beck talked with Craig Rubadoux about his early Sarasota days and what’s on his mind today.

Photo of Syd Solomon teaching art at The Ringling. Craig Rubadoux back row, third one from left
Photo of Syd Solomon teaching art at The Ringling. Craig Rubadoux back row, third one from left

 

PB: What was Sarasota like when you first moved here?

CR: I came to Sarasota in 1945 with my family, when I was seven or eight. Only 45,000 people lived here then. I joined the Sarasota Art association (now Art Center Sarasota) on Palm Avenue. They let me have a one-person show in their storefront when I was twelve.

At that time in Sarasota, there were Beaux Art balls and dances, but I didn’t go to things like that. When I was around thirteen, I took an art class that Syd Solomon taught at the Ringling Museum. I still remember how I spilled a bottle of india ink on the outside loggia floor at the museum during one of his classes. The stain stayed there for years until it came out. I liked watching it fade.

The Ringling School of Art, as Ringling College of Art and Design was formerly called, was only two or three buildings. There was a greater sense of camaraderie between everyone back then there is now. Activities and people from The Ringling School, The Ringling Museum and the Sarasota Art Association all were actively involved with each other.

I took a lot of high school art classes. My art teacher, Mrs. Clements, thought I was promising and took me to meet Ben Stahl at Hilton Leech’s studio. I was a senior in high school and Stahl asked me to be his apprentice. I thought I might be an illustrator like he was, so I could help support my family. But when I saw the hoops you had to jump through—well, let’s just say that I don’t like people telling me what to do or how to paint.

Apres Rodin, 2011, oil on canvas, 40" x 48"
Apres Rodin, 2011, oil on canvas, 40″ x 48″

Then I got a scholarship to Ringling for one year through the Scholastic Art Award. I enjoyed the life classes the best. They had those figure drawing classes three times a week. There was a nice group of teachers at the school, but I couldn’t afford tuition to finish studying there.

When Stahl and his family were getting ready to travel abroad, I was asked to go along as his children’s tutor (although I didn’t do any tutoring…).  We drove through Holland, France and Spain, stopping at museums. We saw a lot of great paintings and it was the first time I saw the Louvre and the Prado. When I saw the Goya paintings at the Prado, they knocked my socks off.

We went to Torremolinos on Mackinlay Kantor’s (the writer) suggestion. Ben Stahl completed his “14 Stations of the Cross” paintings and then he and his family left. I stayed and rented a room. Everything was cheap there. I put out a sign that said ‘Art Gallery,’ on the building where I lived, and had an opening in an unused upstairs space there. The landlady was sympathetic.

I stayed there about eight more months, teaching watercolor and designs for pottery to make money. You didn’t need much money to live. I got another room in the building and had an opening there every Sunday because it was very touristy and new people came to see my work every week. Hotels were just starting to be built.

I painted the fishermen who slept on the beach and the people who traveled by donkey.  At night, I went to the local cafes and had a cognac and sketched the flamenco dancers.

PB: Looking around your house filled with art from many cultures, there’s hardly an empty spot on the walls. What influences are important to you?

CR: Besides much of the art I’ve seen in museums and friends’ work, I also like masks, outsider art and primitive art. I have a lot from Mexico, Africa, New Guinea and Costa Rica and some local Florida work too.  It resonates with me and so I’m overrun with stuff that you see all around my home. I find this kind of art inspirational.

PB: What do you think of the current climate for visual arts in our community?

CR: I don’t get out that much although recently I went to St. Pete. I saw “Post Coital,” a show at Mindy Solomon Gallery I liked, and also the Philip Pearlstein show at the Museum of Fine Arts. But I find that I just have enough time to do my stuff and do my thing. I don’t know what’s happening in places like New York either, and I’m not sure if it would help or hinder my work if I did. But I do get together with painter friends of mine occasionally.

PB: Lately, you’re doing abstract rather than figurative work. Any particular reason?

CR:  I just suddenly felt drawn to explore abstraction again. I’d worked with abstraction in the 80’s. I might go back to figurative.  For now I like working on something I don’t have the answers to; I like the excitement that comes from not knowing how things will turn out.

PB: What’s your first memory of being a painter, even if you didn’t know you were one- as a child?

CG: I always drew, ever since I was a young child. My mother saved drawings of mine from when I was five yrs old. They were from my school class when we lived in Rochester, N.Y. before moving down here.  I remember one—it was of people on horseback seen from a window.

My mother and grandmother both drew and were very supportive of my interest in art. There were those “Learn How to Draw” Walter Foster books all around my house and when my family decided to move, they purposely picked Sarasota because it was known as an arts colony. They thought it would be good for me.

PB: Describe the feeling that makes you want to pick up a brush.

CR: It’s innate; I just have to do it, I have to make some marks in some manner. At this stage in my life, it’s a compulsion. I need to do it, but I like to know that at least one or two people respond to what I do.

PB: What are you thinking about as you paint?

CR: Depends on the mood I’m in or sometimes it’s something trying to get out, it has to get out. They’re not intellectual thoughts I’m having, but rather, how I’m feeling or what I’m experiencing in my life or with the animals or a walk along the beach or river. I think it’s like a diary.

Some of these thoughts could become something I will work on. Or not. It doesn’t matter; I just start sketching. I keep sketchbooks. For example, here’s a sketch I did that got me thinking about the painting next to it.

 

 

Rubadoux's notebook with sketch resulting in "Aurora" (Notebook is oriented correctly)
Rubadoux’s notebook with sketch resulting in “Aurora” (Notebook is oriented correctly)

 

PB: Which artists locally and abroad, dead/alive resonate with you?

Aurora, 2013, oil on canvas, 54" x 72"
Aurora, 2013, oil on canvas, 54″ x 72″

CR: Of people I personally knew, the painter Frank Rampolla was the biggest influence on me. People thought he was my teacher but we were really friends.  After I returned from Spain I took some life classes at Ringling School of Art, where I met Frank. He had a place in Sarasota where we could work. So we hired models and often drew and painted together. Then we would regularly discuss our work and for about ten years, even showed at the same gallery in Coral Gables, the Sindelir gallery. We helped put together a show in that gallery, “The 7 Deadly Sins.”

Eventually he went to USF/Tampa and taught printmaking there.  In fact, he got me a job at USF for a semester or two, but working in that setting wasn’t for me. Sadly, Frank had a heart problem and died at 40 in Tampa.

I like the work of my friends, the people I hang out with like Beatrice del Perrugia, Robert Baxter, Richard Mueller, Joyce Ely Walker, R.O. Woody—I really like so many artists; the list is endless. Of artists I’ve never met, here are some off the top of my head: Paul Klee, Willem de Kooning, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Pieter Bruegel (“Hunters in the Snow” in particular), Edgar Degas, Toulouse Lautrec, Odilon Redon, Paul Cezanne, Henri Matisse, Pierre Bonnard, Hokusai, Balthus, Egon Schiele. I just thrill when I look at the work of these artists. Standing in front of a Botticelli, you almost want to cry.

PB: Your art clearly resonates with a Michigan collector, whom I’ve heard has purchased many pieces from you. Could you please talk about that?

CR: They’re a couple that has bought 160 works from me. They are in the process of publishing a book about me based on their personal collection, which should come out within the next year.

PB: You’re a shy person. How does this quality affect your work?

CR: It gives me more time to paint because I don’t go out to see many people. I have good friends but I enjoy spending a lot of time alone. I find that I can often express through painting what I find difficult to say.

PB: Please give an example of a work you find satisfying and discuss why.

Finn, 2012, oil on canvas, 24" x 24"
Finn, 2012, oil on canvas, 24″ x 24″

CR:  “Finn.”  It sings. I can’t go beyond that. Every stroke seems to fit and help the other one along. Music and dance do that too, when they work. I listen to classical music when I’m painting.

This past year I’ve gone to and enjoyed Momix, the Itzhak Perlman concerts and the opera.

PB: Do you have a conflict between living in world of creative ideas/feelings and living in the practical world?   How do you straddle it?

CR: My kids say not very well. I’d like to approach life the way my high school art teacher told us to: never hurry, never worry, never procrastinate. That’s a good maxim, so I’m trying to live by it more and more. Thing is, I’m having trouble with the ‘never procrastinate’ part.


Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings at Sotheby’s. Perhaps it’s not surprising that she is also a psychotherapist. She has a keen interest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old.Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee & Acquisitions Committee and Institute for the Ages Volunteer.

The Ringling Unveils New Brand Identity by Pamela Beck

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, the State Art Museum of Florida, Florida State University just launched its new brand identity with corresponding graphics and unveiled a secondary name: The Ringling.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, the State Art Museum of Florida, Florida State University just launched its new brand identity with corresponding graphics and unveiled a secondary name: The Ringling. The formal name of the museum will remain the same, although you can see why- The Ringling -is so much more appealing: it’s concise, user-friendly and has a jaunty contemporary punch to it.

Over the last several years, it’s been clear that The Ringling is intent on breaking the dusty stereotype of a museum as simply a passive viewing experience. Programs such as the Art of our Time initiative launched in 2009 with the inaugural Ringling International Arts Festival and series like New Stages: Narrative in Motion have engaged viewers with unique, powerful and unforgettable offerings of the visual and performing arts.

In addition, Ringling By the Bay at Ca’d’ Zan features music and dancing on Art After 5 Thursday evenings; yoga is available on the terrace of Ca’ d’ Zan on the third Saturday of each month; sunsets can be experienced in the James Turrell Skyspace, “Joseph’s Coat”; and the Ringling Underground, “a series of events with live music, art and pop culture in a block-party atmosphere” takes place in the museum’s dreamy courtyard on select nights.

 

2013-04-16_08-55-09_304-1

These options, among many more museum activities not mentioned, illustrate The Ringling’s devotion to serve as an integral and relevant part of the Sarasota community. The launch builds upon this momentum. It reinforces the awareness that the museum is a go-to destination for a variety of cultural, educational and entertainment experiences for all ages.  At the official announcement, Steven High, the museum’s executive director, said that he would like the museum to be known as “visitor friendly and accessible.” He added that he hopes visitors will feel that “this museum is their museum.”

An extensive research process about the museum’s brand identity began in July 2012, with key stakeholders, staff, membership, board members community leaders and patrons of the arts. For outside perspective, the museum also consulted with World Studio, a New York firm specializing in brand design. The new integrated brand platform was then collectively developed.

To assist and clarify The Ringling’s new goals, the six museum venues have each been assigned a descriptive name, color and beautiful, easily identifiable icon that will appear in signage and way-finding, store merchandise, labels, banners, visitor materials, annual reports and other publications. The six venues include: The Ringling Museum of Art; The Ringling Circus Museum; The Ringling Ca’d’ Zan; The Ringling Historic Asolo Theater; The Ringling Education Center and The Ringling Bayfront Gardens.  A new interactive website that encourages visitor participation is slated for the near future.

The “new umbrella identity platform” clarifies the connection between the diverse venues, collections and programs at The Ringling. This consolidation, with its new eye-catching graphic counterpart, signals both a real and perceptual shift for the museum. The Ringling has added to the legacy of John and Mable Ringling by inviting visitors to view themselves as part of the museum’s cultural, creative and innovative present and future development.

 


Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings at Sotheby’s. Perhaps it’s not surprising that she is also a psychotherapist. She has a keen interest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old.Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee; Sarasota-Manatee Dance Alliance, Advisory Board Committee