In Process

In Process is an exhibition of new works from artists Dustin Juengel, Noelle McCleaf, Nathan Skiles, Sarah Viviana Valdez, and Tom Winchester.

Friday, January 27, 2017 (6PM -8PM)
3080 N Washington Blvd, #40, Sarasota

Media on view include photo-realistic and abstract painting, color and black-and-white photography, and video installation. Each artwork represents the artist’s individual style, as well as the commonality of an investigative approach.

Facebook Event Link: https://www.facebook.com/events/1391918094182614/

Meet the Artists

Dustin Juengel
Dustin Juengel earned a BFA in Illustration from Ringling College of Art and Design and a MA in Fine Arts from Chelsea College of Art and Design. He is a visiting Faculty member in the FA department at Ringling College and serves as exhibition curator for Art Center Sarasota. His work has been exhibited in the U.S., UK and Germany.

Dustin Juengel
Dustin Juengel

Noelle McCleaf
For In Process, I will be exhibiting new photographs from the Cassadaga Spiritualist Camp in Cassadaga, Florida. I’ve been fascinated by spiritualism and the metaphysical world for most of my life, and I’ve touched on these themes in previous bodies of work. I plan to return to this vibrant community and explore the landscape and its residents as I build upon this new series.

“Spiritualism is the science, philosophy, and religion based upon the principle of continuous life, demonstrated through mediumship”, (Cassadaga Spiritualist Camp, Rev. Mary Rose Gray).

Modern spiritualism began in the 1840s, and still continues today at the Cassadaga Spiritualist Camp in Cassadaga, Florida. Spirit Doors were used during séances so spirits could enter and exit homes easily. Many of them still remain on homes in Cassadaga, but have been closed due to obvious dangers. Spiritualists do not believe in the concept of ghosts, but spirits, who are allowed to come and go, and are not “stuck” as ghosts are often described.

Noelle McCleaf
Noelle McCleaf

Nathan Skiles
Nathan Skiles lives and works in Sarasota, FL and is an instructor at the Ringling College of and Design. Recent exhibitions include: The Clockmaker’s Apprentice, The Hunterdon Art, Clinton, NJ; Black Forest / White Lightning, Sloan Fine Art, New York, NY; Welcome to Tartarus, Welcome to Valhalla, Greene Contemporary, New York, NY

Nathan Skiles
Nathan Skiles

Sarah Viviana Valdez
Valdez’s work is an investigation on play within order, which has been a common occurrence all throughout her undergraduate work up to present. She currently works in a variety of platforms. The medium of curation allows her to assemble exhibitions as a way to often challenge the institution and its predecessors. She uses live performances combining sound and visuals to explore the malleability of environments, both spatially and on the level of human interaction (the audience-performer relationship). Her primary focus as of late has been the use of digital processes in conjunction with microbial substance, under the loose guise of fashion.

Valdez has been working with unconventional materials that biodegrade in order to merge biology with technology. The proliferation of new technological products assimilated into our daily lives has softened our natural senses and is in the process of divorcing humanity from its very ‘human’-ness. Her use of biological and technological materials proposes a needed identity for herself and to our developing counter-culture — to establish a true connection to the natural decaying world by having a symbiotic exchange with the objects we wear as our second skin. Valdez believes that working with multiple tools and platforms creates pathways within each medium and transforms them into useful objectives to aggregate desire, leisure and productivity for the viewer and herself.

Sarah Viviana Valdez
Sarah Viviana Valdez

Tom Winchester
The Black-and-White series is a collection of traditional, black-and-white photographs, created using thirty-five-millimeter film, that are printed in ways which guide viewers’ interpretations toward theories of postmodernism.

This is accomplished by including nuanced cues that expose the physical elements of the medium, in an attempt to create unique objects that allegorically counteract the infinite reproducibility of digital photographs.

By photographing places and objects that illustrate themes of banality, simulation, and fragmentation, then subsequently printing those images in a traditional process that can degrade, stain, or be subject to arbitrary variations outside of my control, the Black-and-White series utilizes photography’s affinity for depiction in order to convey a sense of lost reality.

Tom Winchester
Tom Winchester

3080 N Washington Blvd, #40, Sarasota, FL

Part Delusion at Crossley Gallery

October 26, 2012
Crossley Gallery, Ringling College, Sarasota FL

Part Delusion is an exhibition of recent works by Ringling College Fine Arts Alumni Brittney Hollinger 11’ and Sean Pearson 12’.

October 26, 2012
Crossley Gallery, Ringling College, Sarasota FL

Brittney and Sean explore the idea of environments and objects in isolation. Rather than focusing on the notion of isolation as an ending, Part Delusion projects a positive investigation of autonomous environments and the possibilities of interconnection.

Opening night is October 26 from 6-9pm. Come out and join us in supporting our two Fine Art Alumni.

Brittney Hollinger (b. 1988) has recently returned from the Picture Berlin Residency Program in Berlin, Germany, and is now working as gallery assistant at Ringling College’s madeby Gallery. Her work has been exhibited both within the US and internationally including “It’s Not Yesterday Anymore” a group show at UFO Presents curated by Lotte Møller in Berlin, Germany. Printed publications of her work includes, “All Tomorrow’s Parties” written by Dmitry Bezouglov as a Featured Artist in the November 2011 edition of Fashion Week Magazine in Russia, and “Art Takes Miami” in December 2011, in tandem with Scope Art Fair in Miami, Florida. Hollinger continues to actively exhibit in the United States.

Each piece in this series is a sculptural representation of disparate component parts that attempt to exaggerate public perceptions of a private sum. These scenes, though seemingly dissimilar, try to evoke invisible relationships of interconnectivity both physically and emotionally using the physical space and the illustrated space.

http://brittneyhollinger.com/

Sean Pearson (b 1989) Lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. He currently works at MoMA PS1 in Long Island City, Queens as well as AICAD/New York Studio Program in Brooklyn. Sean will be participating in a group exhibition at et al Projects (Brooklyn) with fellow Ringling College of Art and Design alumni Reva Castillenti ’09 in December.

My practice in this instance is an investigation of travel in its potential and extremes, particularly in how a new environment requires that special adaptations take place within the body and one’s culture, bringing about new forms. These drawings are monolithic yet express a sense of mobility, and fluidity. I am interested in the idea of experiencing a monumental form and wondering about the endeavors that must have taken place for its existence.

http://seanrogerpearson.com/

Public art controversy is a good thing! by Joan Altabe

Don’t believe it, Sarasota. Getting called a “tough crowd” this week by your local newspaper over your public art controversies shows ignorance. Sarasota doesn’t have a franchise on this. Public art brouhahas in other cities abound.

Joan Altabe

Don’t believe it, Sarasota. Getting called a “tough crowd” this week by your local newspaper over your public art controversies shows ignorance. Sarasota doesn’t have a franchise on this. Public art brouhahas in other cities abound.

Even in New York, the art capital of the world, controversy has raged. A biggie was Richard Serra’s abstract sculpture Tilted Art that was removed from its perch in Manhattan’s Federal Plaza after a majority vote at a public hearing. One hundred and twenty two people testified and 58 of them voted in favor of removing it, even despite Serra who contended, “I don’t think it is the function of art to be pleasing, Art is not democratic.”

Monument to Joe Louis by Robert Graham 1986, Bronze
Then there was the fracas in Detroit over “Monument to Joe Louis” by Robert Graham. The monument – a cast bronze 24-foot-long forearm with an ungloved clenched fist thrust through a 24-foot-high pyramid of four steel beams, known as “The Fist” – prompted immediate furor. Detroit saw it as a reminder of urban violence in the city – often referred to a as “Murder Capital of America.” (By the way, “The Fist” still stands in Detroit and – get this – it’s now featured on the city’s website as a tourist attraction).

Then there was the wrangle over the Chicago Picasso. An untitled 50-foot-tall Cubist sculpture by Pablo Picasso installed in the ‘60s in Daley Plaza caused instant derisions. A City Council alderman sought an immediate replacement. Yet, it still stands and has become a Chicago landmark, a popular meeting place and a site for public events. It even made the movies, the 80’s movie The Blues Brothers.

The moral of the story? Give public art a chance – a time for second looks, second thoughts and yes, bickering. Far worse than complaining about public art is vandalizing it. I’m thinking of nine plaques of a 40-panel semi-abstract rendition of human faces by sculptor Frank Colson that was ripped from their moorings at the Sarasota Visual Art Center in ’99 – smashed and left in fragments. And a short time before that, half of the spotlights for the sculpture garden at the center were kicked away and stomped on, throwing the art into darkness at night. And a month before that, plastic markers, which told sculpture garden visitors what they were looking at, were cracked off their metal stands.

And in case you think art vandals are those who don’t appreciate art, consider the students from Ecole des Beau-Arts who once felt so repelled by a Man Ray collage that they riddled it with bullets.

So when it comes to public art, whether in Detroit, Chicago, NY or Sarasota, controversy is good way to go – good for cities, good for art.

Here’s to the dustups.


Former visual arts critic for the Sarasota Herald-Tribune and the Bradenton Herald, former New York City art teacher and longtime award-winning art and architecture critic for U.S. and overseas publications, is referenced in “Who’s Who in American Art” and “Who’s Who of American Women” and currently writes as the St. Petersburg art Examiner and National art Examiner. Altabe has written several books including “Art Behind the Scenes” (100 painters in and out of their studio) and “Sculpture off the Pedestal” (25 sculptors in and out of their studio). Both available at Amazon.com.

Letters from Brooklyn – #1

Our first conversation on the Achievements of Ringling’s most recent alumni that are currently living in Brooklyn, NY. A conversation between Daniel Miller and Sean Pearson.

Daniel,

I thought it would be appropriate to start our first conversation on the Achievements of Ringling’s most recent alumni that are currently living in Brooklyn, NY. 2012 alumnus Kyle Petreycik recently received the 2012 Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award. His selected piece will be shown at the Grounds For Sculpture Fall/ Exhibition in Hamilton, New Jersey, and he will also be featured in the October 2012 issue of Sculpture Magazine. Some other alumni have received jobs working first hand in the art world. Christofer Degrer, another 2012 alumnus has been co-assisting and organizing events for Kreemart, a company that hosts collaborations between acclaimed pastry chefs and internationally renowned artists. They have worked on projects with Marina Abromovic, Maurizio Cattelan, and Richard Tuttle. Recently he has been working closely with the founder of Kreemart, Raphael Castroriano, in assisting with events for the Annual Whitney Art Party, where they worked with the performance artist Kalup Linzy. So far the amount of activity being generated by alumni is nonetheless inspiring. Many of us came to New York and left our expectations behind and gained new achievements in the process.

Best Regards,

Sean

Richard MacDonald Exhibiting at Harmony Gallery

April 2 – May 25, 2012
Artist Rich MacDonald will exhibit new paintings and composites at the Harmony Gallery, Beatrice Friedman Symphony Center, from April 2 to May 24th. Opening reception for the artist will be April 4 from 5 to 6:30 PM at the Harmony Gallery.

April 2 – May 25, 2012
Harmony Gallery, Beatrice Friedman Symphony Center

Artist Rich MacDonald will exhibit new paintings and composites at the Harmony Gallery, Beatrice Friedman Symphony Center, from April 2 to May 24th. Opening reception for the artist will be April 4 from 5 to 6:30 PM at the Harmony Gallery.

Richard MacDonald

Mr. MacDonald created almost all the works for this show in Sarasota. “Beside its garden-like physical beauty, the City of Sarasota has unbelievable artistic and cultural energy for a community of its size”. The choice of subjects in these new works relates directly to his recent move to Sarasota from New York and Long Island. Previously exhibited in the Hamptons, Long Island, NY, the exhibition at the Harmony gallery is Mr. MacDonald’s first show in Sarasota.

“I am thrilled to be a part of the Harmony Gallery series of exhibitions. The space, which is the home of the internationally know Sarasota Orchestra, is beautiful and inspirational.”

The Harmony Gallery is located in the Orchestra’s Harmony Gallery, located in the atrium of the Beatrice Friedman Symphony Center. The Gallery is free and open to the public during normal business hours, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, and during concerts that take place at Holley Hall.


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