Art Basel Miami Beach” by Pamela Beck

ArtDart by Pamela Beck: Everybody knows that you can’t see everything when you go to Art Basel Miami Beach. It’s not that you don’t want to, you do. You really do.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.

Everybody knows that you can’t see everything when you go to Art Basel Miami Beach. It’s not that you don’t want to, you do. You really do. But there are more than 20 fairs, more than 75,000 visitors, and your mind stops working after several hours of concentrated art viewing and the constant jostling of well-dressed strangers.

Even if you have the stamina to make it to all of the fairs, there’s the not insignificant problem of finding a taxi to actually get you to them. It’s enough to make you stand on a street corner swearing that you’ll never return to Art Basel again… until you remember that the fabulous Design District will be completed about this time, 2014.

I saw many things that delighted me this year. Like this:

“Seer Bonnet XXI [Eliza] and Seer Bonnett XX [Emily]” Bonnets encrusted with thousands of pearl-headed corsage pins Lisa Sette Gallery
“Seer Bonnet XXI [Eliza] and Seer Bonnett XX [Emily]”
Bonnets encrusted with thousands of pearl-headed corsage pins
Lisa Sette Gallery
This is Angela Ellsworth’s strong statement about traditional Mormonism, her own background. (The points of the pins face inward, while the beautiful pearls reflect another message. Sister wives takes on a whole new meaning…]

And this:

“Tiny Landscape Painting, Antigua: Hurricane Sky, Black Jagged Hill” Oil on Polaroid card 1O x 8 cm Ingleby Gallery
“Tiny Landscape Painting, Antigua:
Hurricane Sky, Black Jagged Hill”
Oil on Polaroid card
1O x 8 cm
Ingleby Gallery

Frank Walter lived in an isolated shack in Antigua for 25 years. He suffered from delusions of aristocratic grandeur but produced these simple, powerful works.

And this:

“Ceyx” Graphite and Ink on paper 5O x 38 inches Dillon Gallery
“Ceyx”
Graphite and Ink on paper
5O x 38 inches
Dillon Gallery

Leah Yerpe’s perfectly rendered figures are riveting as they evoke the beauty and mystery of both human and celestial bodies.

And no trip to Miami will ever again be without a stop at the inspiring Perez Art Museum [PAMM], dramatically set against Biscayne Bay.

Photo:  Perez Art Museum Miami Partial View of Ai Weiwei's "Forever" installation of Chinese bicycles
Photo:
Perez Art Museum Miami
Partial View of Ai Weiwei’s “Forever” installation of Chinese bicycles

Herzog & de Meuron designed this jawdroppingly, elegant structure, both contemporary and organic with its use of concrete, wood and pervasive garden and water features. In a distinct “today’s-museum” style, PAMM compellingly combines art, nature, entertainment, leisure and respect for local culture/climate.

Photo: Perez Art Museum Miami Outside view
Photo: Perez Art Museum Miami
Outside view

The beautiful, sprawling entrance immediately stops you in your tracks with its latticed roof, abundant terraces, and plant infused columns hanging from the roof like tropical stalactites.

Inside, the airy exhibition rooms currently display diverse shows including: “Ai Weiwei: According to What,” the powerful political and personal installations of this outspoken critic of the Chinese government. [Ai was prohibited from traveling to see this exhibition.]

And, in contrast, another exhibit, “A Human Document: Selections from the Sackner Collection of Concrete and Visual Poetry,” is private and quiet, where words and images fuse to create fantastic works that span centuries and styles.

A friend asked me if the museum overpowered the art on exhibit. It’s a fair question. Being inside such a beautifully designed and constructed building is undeniably exciting and uplifting, particularly with the pervasive window views of lush gardens and the bay; not to mention the inviting seating areas, both inside and out, that are already crowd-pleasers.

In the end, my friend’s question will be answered by the art on display. Either it will encourage a visitor’s full involvement or it will be overwhelmed by the particulars of this pleasurable museum experience. Interestingly, this built-in competition is a provocative test for the art itself.

The same challenge can be given to the art presented at the Miami art fairs. The works that engaged me in that supercharged, distracting atmosphere are the ones I’ll remember; and the search for them and what they evoked in me, are the reasons I’ll return.

Now all I need is a car and driver.

Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela is Public relations director for Season of Sculpture and a private art consultant. She co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings at Sotheby’s. She was Communications Director of The Essential Element. Pamela has a keen intrest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old. Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee and Institute for the Ages Volunteer.

    To read more about Pamela, view these links:

Mindy Solomon Gallery to Move to Miami Arts District

After four years in downtown St. Petersburg, Florida, Mindy Solomon, founder and director of the Mindy Solomon Gallery, has decided to make a strategic professional move.

After four years in downtown St. Petersburg, Florida, Mindy Solomon, founder and director of the Mindy Solomon Gallery, has decided to make a strategic professional move.

The gallery, currently located at 124 2nd Avenue NE and established in 2009, has enjoyed critical and commercial success, with a loyal local collectors base and national and international clientele. Solomon feels it is time to broaden the market by moving to Miami, “a rapidly growing international city and the gateway to South America.” Having participated in over 40 national and international art fairs, Solomon feels there is more significant growth opportunity for the gallery program and the artists in a larger market. Solomon stated: “I am thankful for my years in the Tampa Bay Area and feel that the arts community will continue to flourish and nurture the growing interests of the collecting community.” Solomon’s current exhibition, ‘The Paintings of Erin Parish,’ on view until September 21st, will be the final show at the St. Petersburg location. Solomon’s next exhibition, the work of Generic Art Solutions, will be the debut show in Miami and is planned for October 16th, 2013, with an opening reception on Wednesday, October 16th from 6-9pm. The gallery’s new location will be at 172 NW 24th Street, Miami.

Generic Art Solutions // The Raft, 2010 // 30x40 inches // archival digital print on photographic paper
Generic Art Solutions // The Raft, 2010 // 30×40 inches // archival digital print on photographic paper

Mindy Solomon Gallery (MSG) specializes in contemporary emerging and mid-career artists. Represented works include painting, sculpture, photography, and video in both narrative and non-objective styles. The MSG also exhibits some of the most prestigious contemporary Korean artists on the world market today. With an interest in client education, such as an upcoming collectors tour to South Korea, and regular artists talks and VIP events, the gallery is a full-service showcase of the international art world. Represented artists of note include: Berlin-based painter Christopher Winter; Scottish photographer Muir Vidler; Korean sculptural artist Kang Hyo Lee; Mexican mixed-media artists the de la Torre Brothers; New York-based painter James Kennedy; and an array of other national and international talent.

Named one of the Top 500 Galleries Worldwide in the Modern Painters 2013 Annual Guide, Mindy Solomon Gallery participates in many prestigious art fairs, including the upcoming Art Miami fair during Art Basel’s Art Week in Miami Beach, as well as the Zona Maco Contemporary Art Fair in Mexico City, VOLTA NY, and Shanghai Contemporary. Always interested in the intersection of art and design, Mindy Solomon and her staff work closely with designers, advisors, consultants and curators to inform and integrate fine works of art into every aesthetic environment.

Mindy Solomon Gallery // Art Southampton Booth // 2013
Mindy Solomon Gallery // Art Southampton Booth // 2013

The Paintings of Erin Parish

July 20-Sept. 14
Mindy Solomon Gallery, St. Petersburg, FL

Erin Parish, A Sudden Gust of Wind (After Hokusai)  2013, oil and epoxy resin on canvas, 48" x 72"
Erin Parish, A Sudden Gust of Wind (After Hokusai) 2013, oil and epoxy resin on canvas, 48″ x 72″

ST. PETERSBURG, FL—The Mindy Solomon Gallery is proud to present the paintings of American abstract artist Erin Parish July 20-September 14, with an Opening Night Reception Saturday, July 20th from 6-9pm and Artist’s Talk at 6:30pm.

“Touch is the other side of movement. Movement is the other side of touch. They are the shadow of each other.” Bonnie Bainbridge Cohen

Erin Parish is the daughter of four artists. As a child growing up, common talk on Sunday mornings centered on the New York Times and the art world and its philosophical and commercial vacillations. Parish listened intently and began to form significant and lasting opinions about art and the pathways of creative thinking. She has been exhibiting regularly since the age of eighteen and is now nearing her fourth decade of being a practicing artist.

Her early influences ranged from Joseph Cornell to the German Expressionists and Neue Wilde artists of the 1980s. Today she is very much taken with the Hudson River School artists as well as Moriko Mori, Yayoi Kusama, and Japanese woodcuts by Hokusai and Hiroshige. She finds herself aligned with the Japanese principles of Wabi Sabi and Yugen.

Erin Parish, Winter Has Been Conquered, 2010, oil and resin on canvas,  60" x 36"
Erin Parish, Winter Has Been Conquered, 2010, oil and resin on canvas, 60″ x 36″

Parish describes her paintings as follows: “I create art based on what I stumble upon in nature. What might appear mundane on the surface can be complex and beautiful upon closer inspection. People seldom notice the reflection in a puddle or the dewdrops on a leaf, but every component is a microcosm of nature in its entirety. Nature is composed layers upon layers of interconnected ecosystems. Every aspect is constantly evolving, but nature’s motion is often only clear to us at a larger scale. On the cellular level, the change in fall foliage starts unseen by us. With the new green of buds come an awareness of the approach of spring. My artwork responds to nature’s continuous circle of flux. I try to capture and preserve a moment that passes too quickly for most of us to see.”

Parish lives on Miami Beach and gathers much inspiration from her environment. Her meditative, ethereal works convey liquidity and tranquility evocative of the ocean. With an ever-shifting palette of colors that seem to move and transform on the surface, Parish creates a sense of time and space that inspires a moment of quiet.

Erin Parish, Neurogenisis,  2013, oil and resin on canvas, 40" x 90"
Erin Parish, Neurogenisis, 2013, oil and resin on canvas, 40″ x 90″

EXHIBITION INFORMATION:
Mindy Solomon Gallery presents ‘The Paintings of Erin Parish’ July 20-September 14, 2013 at Mindy Solomon Gallery. An Opening Night Reception takes place Saturday, July 20th, from 6-9pm, with an Artist’s Talk at 6:30pm. Erin Parish, abstract artist, is based out of Miami Beach. Her meditative, ethereal works convey liquidity and tranquility evocative of the ocean. Mindy Solomon Gallery is located at 124 2nd Ave. NE, St. Petersburg, FL 33701. The gallery is open Wednesday-Saturday from 11am-5pm. For more information, please contact the gallery at info@mindysolomon.com or 727-502-0852, or visit the website at www.mindysolomon.com.

Mindy Solomon Gallery:

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Interview with Yolanda Sanchez

Cuban born abstract painter, Yolanda Sanchez, earned an MFA from Yale in the mid 90’s, 15 years after earning a Ph.D. Clinical Psychology from Florida State. While at Yale, she studied with the British painter, John Walker, who became a mentor, and with Andrew Forge and David Pease, among others.

Currently, Yolanda lives and works in Miami Beach, Florida and her work joins 16 other contemporary abstract painters as part of Selby Gallery’s newest exhibition Abstract, adj.: Expressing a quality apart from an object opening Friday, February 22 – April 3, 2013 at the Ringling College of Art and Design. Below, Tim Jaeger interviews Sanchez about her work, process, and abstraction.

Yolanda Sanchez, Something in the Air, oil on canvas, 2012, 70" x 60"
Yolanda Sanchez, Something in the Air, oil on canvas, 2012, 70″ x 60″

sVA: For those who have a hard time understanding abstract art, what is it?

YS: I am sure there are many definitions of “abstract art.” I like to think of it as a simplification, a sort of “boiling down” to what is essential. One can also think of it as a synthesis or condensation of an image or feelings or events, which in turn, are translated into a composition based on relationships between color, marks and/or shapes. For some artists, this definition would not even apply as some artists believe that abstraction is wholly devoid of content. My work, however, is, in fact, loosely based on the natural world – but “abstracted” or condensed into a series of marks and gestures that, together with color, create the work.

sVA: Why did you choose abstract as your creative style of choice?

YS: I think that abstraction chose me! For a long time, I was a figurative painter, but gradually, I came to feel that working figuratively was limiting for me – that I could do more or say more of what I wanted by working abstractly. The change was made gradually, however. Over time, and little by little, I began to eliminate the recognizable imagery, until it disappeared. It took a while to feel comfortable with this. Abstraction allows me a great deal more freedom to work with the tools I have – color, light, mark and gesture – and to some extent, facilitates more of a dialogue with the viewer – it allows the viewer greater opportunity to enter into interaction with the work, to project their own interpretation of what may be going on. I am influenced by calligraphy, poetry and Asian painting primarily in terms of mark-making and the handling of space. Abstraction allows me to integrate these influences in a non-literal way. I am not trying to make paintings that look Asian, but rather I want to access the invisible forces that drive that particular aesthetic.

sVA: Describe your creative process.

YS: Making art for me is a way of paying attention, of being more present in the world. It is my desire to become a more “finely tuned observer” and to live more in the moment. My work is primarily driven by color and I usually start with a certain palette in mind, although color may change as I work. My work is process-oriented – meaning that the work evolves as it is made. In other words, I create the work as I do it. I let the painting speak to me and I never really know where it will end up. Some works come about easily; others are more hard-won. I wish I knew what conditions lead to one or the other, but I don’t! My work is spiritually based to a large extent, and thus, being in the right frame of mind is very important. Sometimes I meditate before I start to work or I will read poetry. Poetry is a key element to my work – it is another portal to what I want to access – as is calligraphy and dance. I am interested inmovement (I had early training in dance), and how movement and stillness relate to one another (this is what calligraphy and dance have in common.)

sVA: Do you think that painting abstract allows you more freedom?

YS: Working abstractly allows me to create a space that is fluid, impermanent and changing; it leaves something that is unsaid and that is incomplete. I like the idea of something being “incomplete” as it makes the work more interesting and permits the viewer to complete the work.

sVA: Abstract art evokes a lot of emotions through color and composition. Can you tell us how you use color and composition to evoke emotion in your pieces?

YS: As I said above, my work is primarily steered by color, mark and gesture. These are my tools to communicate what I desire. Of the three, color is most important to me and it is the essence of the work. I do not form particular associations of color to particular emotions. These relationships are open-ended and different for each painting. My use of a certain shade of pink for one painting does not necessarily crossover for another painting. White is a key “color” in the work and it has a positive presence. The composition itself – the relationship between the painted and unpainted spaces (white) and the accumulation of marks – also plays an important role in conveying a distinct feeling or emotion. The work, as I said, is a condensation of feelings or experiences. The work is not about language nor does it necessarily want interpretation – but aims to achieve a sensual, visual pleasure.

In some ways, I am trying to create an intermediate space that is really between inner and outer worlds. I am, in a way, painting “the in-between” and once labeled an entire show “Meditations on the Between.”

sVA: What has been your greatest difficulty as an abstract artist and how did you overcome it?

YS: I think the biggest challenge in making abstract art for me was to really grant myself the freedom that it tolerates. There is a certain safety in painting figuratively. Painting without a lot of structure is sometimes harder than you would think. This continues to test me. Also, I am constantly striving for simplification, and yet, my works have a complexity to them that I believe really reflects who I am. As I evolve, I hope that my work will follow. You show your true face in your work – it is inevitable.

sVA: What is next for you?

Ys: I have several series in mind at the moment. One idea comes from a book entitled “Music of Silence” in which the hours of the day are given special, sacred significance (as they are in a monastery). Each hour has an individual character and presence. The challenge is to interpret this – in a non-literal way – and to make works that convey the essence and message of each hour.

Want to see more of Yolanda Sanchez’s work?

http://www.markelfinearts.com/artist/Yolanda_Sanchez/works/
http://www.jjohnsongallery.com/artist-page/yolanda-sanchez.html

Feb. 22 – April 3, 2013
Contemporary Abstract Painting
Selby Galleries I & II: The resurgence of Abstract Painting in contemporary art provides this opportunity to explore current trends in relation to the historic movement through the exhibition of eight working painters ranging in age from their thirties’ to their eighties’ who are inspired by nature, music, mathematics, the spiritual and new media.
• Artists Talk and Preview: Thurs., Feb. 21, 7 p.m.
• Opening Reception & Performances: Fri., Feb. 22, 5-7 p.m.
• Director’s Tour: Mon., Feb. 25, 11:30 a.m.

Installation-Abstract, adj.- Expressing a quality apart from an object
Installation-Abstract, adj.- Expressing a quality apart from an object

Open letter to the Downtown Merchants Alliance

Miami Beach gets the Basel Art Fair and we get Sarasota Master Art Festival. Classing a street fair as a “Sarasota Master Art Festival” and touting unnamed vendors as “the nation’s finest artists” prompts the question, have you no sense of place, of history?

Fury sits beneath these words.

Miami Beach gets the Basel Art Fair and we get Sarasota Masters Art Festival. Classing a street fair as a “Sarasota Masters Art Festival” and touting unnamed vendors as “the nation’s finest artists” prompts the question, have you no sense of place, of history?

Sarasota Masters Art Festival

You want to talk “Sarasota Master Art”? Let’s name names that come with bona fides. There’s no need to look very far. The “Artists Who Made Sarasota Famous” show now on view at Art Center Sarasota tells the story.

More than 60 years ago, the town boasted art luminaries like Helen Sawyer, who New York Times writer Elizabeth Luther Cary compared to Francisco Goya. In the comparison, Cary found Goya’s wanting when it came to skies. “We may think of Goya’s carnival scenes under stormy skies,” Cary wrote, “but I cannot recall any by Goya in which the battle of the two extremes plays such a passionate part.”

And after Life Magazine tagged Jon Corbino “the Rubens of New England” and he got two Guggenheim Fellowships, was elected a member of the National Academy of Design, and received the first grant awarded to a visual artist from the prestigious National Institute of Art and Letters, he, too, joined the Sarasota art community.

Then there are the latter-day “masters” like sculptor John Chamberlain. In the early ‘80s, he moved to an 18,000-square-foot warehouse studio on Cocoanut Avenue to make the grand scale work for which he’s celebrated. The Guggenheim Museum is mounting a retro beginning next month.

There’s no point going on with this list. If “master art” has to be explained to you at this point, it’s too late. Your effort to edify a patently obvious marketing strategy under the banner “Sarasota Masters Art” disserves the town, vulgarizes it and makes it some Anywhere, U.S.A. out to drum up business.

Check your press releases for hype, DMA. From where I sit, it’s just gray scud on the page.

Signed,
Joan Altabe

P.S. Are the lights fading on fine art in Sarasota? Given what you’re doing, like a setting sun – slowly but inexorably.


Joan Altabe

Joan Altabe, former visual arts critic for the Sarasota Herald-Tribune and the Bradenton Herald, former New York City art teacher and longtime award-winning art and architecture critic for U.S. and overseas publications, is referenced in “Who’s Who in American Art” and “Who’s Who of American Women” and currently writes as the St. Petersburg art Examiner and National art Examiner.

Altabe has written several books including “Art Behind the Scenes” (100 painters in and out of their studio) and “Sculpture off the Pedestal” (25 sculptors in and out of their studio). Both available at Amazon.com.