“American Moderns, 1910-1960: From O’Keeffe to Rockwell at The Ringling” by Pamela Beck

If you weren’t one of the 900 or so revelers at The Ringling for the recent opening of “American Moderns, 1910-1960: From O’Keeffe to Rockwell,” when was the last time you saw an exhibition including paintings by Georgia O’Keeffe, Marsden Hartley, Arthur Dove, Milton Avery, Stuart Davis, Joseph Stella and Norman Rockwell in the same show?

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.

If you weren’t one of the 900 or so revelers at The Ringling for the recent opening of  “American Moderns, 1910-1960: From O’Keeffe to Rockwell,” when was the last time you saw an exhibition including paintings by Georgia O’Keeffe, Marsden Hartley, Arthur Dove, Milton Avery, Stuart Davis, Joseph Stella and Norman Rockwell in the same show?

Marsden Hartley (American, 1877-1943). Handsome Drinks, 1916. Oil on composition board, 24 x 20 in. (61 x 50.8 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Milton Lowenthal, 72.3
Marsden Hartley (American, 1877-1943). Handsome Drinks, 1916. Oil on composition board, 24 x 20 in. (61 x 50.8 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Milton Lowenthal, 72.3

These paintings and works by other artists (57 artworks in total) comprise this traveling exhibition organized and co- curated by the Brooklyn Museum from their permanent collection.

Joseph Stella (American, born Italy, 1877-1946). The Virgin, 1926. Oil on canvas, 39 11-16 x 38 3-4 in. (100.8 x 98.4 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Adolph Lewisohn, 28.207
Joseph Stella (American, born Italy, 1877-1946). The Virgin, 1926. Oil on canvas, 39 11-16 x 38 3-4 in. (100.8 x 98.4 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Adolph Lewisohn, 28.207

Steven High, executive director of The Ringling, describes this time period in our country covered in the show as follows: “Between 1910 and 1960, both American society and art underwent tumultuous and far-reaching transformations. The United States emerged as an international power of economic industrial and military might, while also experiencing two world wars and the Great Depression.”

Max Weber (American, born Russia, 1881-1961). Abraham Walkowitz, 1907. Oil on canvas, 25 1-4 x 20 1-4 in. (64.1 x 51.4 cm), Framed- 30 1-2 x 25 1-2 in. (77.5 x 64.8 cm), Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Abraham Walkowitz, 44.65
Max Weber (American, born Russia, 1881-1961). Abraham Walkowitz, 1907. Oil on canvas, 25 1-4 x 20 1-4 in. (64.1 x 51.4 cm), Framed- 30 1-2 x 25 1-2 in. (77.5 x 64.8 cm), Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Abraham Walkowitz, 44.65

Mindful of the impact these enormous societal, cultural and economic changes had on artists during this particular time in history, the exhibition is divided into six themes:

Cubist Experiments

The Still Life Revisited

Nature Essentialized

Modern Structures

Engaging Characters

Americana

As a result, a broad variety of subject matter and styles can be contemplated and seen on a walk through the Searing Wing. For example, art depicting America’s urbanization and industrialization is displayed, as are reactions to these modern changes—seen in paintings of organic natural beauty. 2Oth century American artists’ responses to European cubism are on view, as are more traditional artworks reflecting American self-definition and identity.

The useful and beautifully illustrated catalogue reinforces this overview and is a wonderful companion to the exhibition. It parallels the curators’ choice to present the multi-faceted American Modern artist sensibility through thought provoking thematic commonalities and contrasts rather than dry chronological order.

Matthew McLendon, The Ringling’s curator of modern and contemporary art says what excites him about this exhibition is “seeing, in a very condensed way, the enormous amount of innovation, evolution and productivity in the American art scene during this time.”

This is a diverse group of artists. And while it’s wonderful to see “old friends” exhibited together, the inclusion of work by unfamiliar or lesser-known artists adds a welcome element of surprise.

George Copeland Ault (American, 1891-1948). Manhattan Mosaic, 1947. Oil on canvas, 31 7-8 x 18 in. (81 x 45.7 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Dick S. Ramsay Fund, 66.127
George Copeland Ault (American, 1891-1948). Manhattan Mosaic, 1947. Oil on canvas, 31 7-8 x 18 in. (81 x 45.7 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Dick S. Ramsay Fund, 66.127

But the old favorites don’t disappoint. From the exuberant splashes of bold color, controlled energy and hard-edged shapes of Stuart Davis, and the powerfully charged, course canvases of intense color and simple forms of Marsden Hartley (which somehow always feel like self-portraits whether they’re of a bird or a glass), to the up-close-and-personal Georgia O’Keefe—you’ll recognize the work of many artists from across a crowded room. (This speaks volumes about the personal “thumbprint” of every artist.)

 

Marsden Hartley (American, 1877-1943). Summer Clouds and Flowers, 1942. Oil on fabricated board, 22 x 28 in. (55.9 x 71.1 cm). © Estate of Marsden Hartley, Yale University
Marsden Hartley (American, 1877-1943). Summer Clouds and Flowers, 1942. Oil on fabricated board, 22 x 28 in. (55.9 x 71.1 cm). © Estate of Marsden Hartley, Yale University

For O’Keeffe fans, the inclusion of two unusual choices is interesting to note:  “Green, Yellow and Orange,” a completely abstract painting, and “Fishhook from Hawaii,” a wonderful work with imagery created for a Dole Pineapple Company ad campaign which O’Keeffe worked on (while experiencing financial hardship during the Great Depression). The telescoping effect created by the loops of wire, and the oversized feathery fish lure, play beautifully with space, color and optical illusion (not illustrated here).

Georgia O'Keeffe (American, 1887-1986). Green, Yellow and Orange, 1960. Oil on canvas, 40 x 30 in. (101.6 x 76.2 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Bequest of Georgia O'Keeffe, 87.136.3
Georgia O’Keeffe (American, 1887-1986). Green, Yellow and Orange, 1960. Oil on canvas, 40 x 30 in. (101.6 x 76.2 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Bequest of Georgia O’Keeffe, 87.136.3

We’re fortunate The Ringling has brought in an exhibition to expose viewers to a period of American art not substantially represented in the museum’s permanent collection.

It’s all the more impressive that this exciting show takes place during our supposedly “slow” Sarasota summer months, yet had the biggest turnout on a members’ opening night in The Ringling’s history.

When you see the exhibition yourself, you’ll know why.

 

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

“American Moderns, 1910-1960: From O’Keeffe to Rockwell”

June 14- Sept. 8, 2013

5401 Bay Shore Rd.

Sarasota

941 359-5700

www.ringling.org

 

American Moderns, 1910-1960: From O’Keeffe to Rockwell, has been organized by the Brooklyn Museum

Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings at Sotheby’s. Perhaps it’s not surprising that she is also a psychotherapist. She has a keen interest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old. Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee and Institute for the Ages Volunteer.

“The Warren J. and Margot Coville Photography Collection at the John and Mable Ringling Museum” by Pamela Beck

Recently I attended “In a Conversation with the Collector” at the Historic Asolo Theater. There were two chairs on the stage for Warren Coville and Matthew McLendon, Ringling’s Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her new column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.


Pamela Beck

by Pamela Beck

It’s a good thing for visitors to the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art that Warren J. Coville decided to use part of his bar mitzvah money to buy his first camera many years ago. This began a lifelong passion with cameras and photography that would result in an important collection of late 19th to 21st century photographs, more than 1,000 of which have been donated to the Ringling museum by Warren and Margot Coville.

Photographs by Henri Cartier-Bresson, Andre Kertesz, Alfred Eisenstaedt, Berenice Abbott and Robert Capa, among others, comprise the Coville’s gift.

Recently I attended “In a Conversation with the Collector” at the Historic Asolo Theater. There were two chairs on the stage for Warren Coville and Matthew McLendon, Ringling’s Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art. But before they sat down, Mr. Coville came to the front of the stage, turned towards the audience with his camera, and took several shots of us looking at him.

We laughed. He smiled. We connected. This was a perfect introduction to Coville as a photographer and collector, a man who likes to frame life’s moments so they can be caught, observed and enjoyed in perpetuity, rather than disappear into unreliable memory. In fact, the reason he said digital photography didn’t interest him was because of its instability- it doesn’t last like a gelatin silver print does.

I’m glad that images including: Hitler and Mussolini Meeting in Venice; the Eiffel Tower mid-construction; Lee Harvey Oswald being shot; Conchita Citron, the woman bullfighter; hospital workers in the South Bronx and portraits of Martin Luther King and Winston Churchill, along with other photographs, were preserved and are now a permanent part of the Ringling Museum for us to view. It’s both moving and disarming to see such a large collection of extraordinary images that reflect our collective experience of life’s large and small moments.

Robert Capa, Conchita Cintron, Mexico, 1940
Gift of Warren J. and Margot Coville, 2012, TR2011.2907.20

The Covilles not only enjoyed looking at the photographs in their collection, they enjoyed buying them as well. For over twenty years, they traveled from Michigan to attend the biannual Photograph auctions at Christie’s and Sotheby’s in New York. Mr. Coville recalled the buzz that only an auction room can create as buyers bid against each other for the same lot while the public watches.

ARTdart: Going, Going, Gone A Bit Crazy by Pamela Beck

The bidding process can become entertainment itself. Mr. Coville described purchasing a Clarence H. White portfolio of photographs at Christies in the 1980’s, for what was then a record price- $21,000. He recalled with a smile that when the auctioneer’s gavel came down and he was the winner, the entire audience broke into applause.

It’s interesting to develop a photograph collection- for the pleasure of looking at the images; to enjoy the hunt for special ones; to round out the collection to best reflect the goals of the collectors; to leave it for others to share; but Dr. McLendon wanted to know what the Coville’s motivation was for continuing to collect over the years.

Mr. Coville explained that photojournalism, in particular, spoke to him because of his interest in history. Looking at the images was a “learning experience” he said, and that just like any other collector of cars, art or glass, collecting them became a passion. The Covilles also looked forward to the excitement auctions brought and the travel involved to acquire the photographs of interest to them.

Today the Covilles live part time in Sarasota. After listening to him talk with such devotion about his collection, I’m sure we’ll run in to them at the Ringling Museum, when we go to visit the stunning selection of photographs they so generously donated.

The current exhibition of approximately 75 photographs at the Ringling Museum, “The Warren J. and Margot Coville Photography Collection,” is part of the museum’s Art of Our Time initiative, “which features work by artists that are shaping the trends in contemporary visual and performance art” according to the museum. This exhibition runs through February 3, 2013 in the Ulla R. and Arthur F. Searing Wing.


To read more about Pamela, view these links:
http://srxq.blogspot.com/
http://whatdogsreallythink.blogspot.com/

Stephen McFadden shoots 10×10

Stephen McFadden provides you with a video tour of the most recent 10×10 Event held at State of the Art Gallery, March 2012.

See the speakers at this particular 10×10 event here: Introducing Thursday Night’s Leaders: 10×10

The intention of this event is to showcase and introduce a diverse group of leaders from the local creative community. Each speaker will present 10 images. The images will automatically advance every 30 seconds. In 300 seconds and 10 images, each speaker will give us an overview of their background, current work, or interests.

Learn more about Stephen McFadden: www.mcfaddencreative.com

Featured Visiting Artist: Sanford Biggers

A native of Los Angeles, California, and current New York resident, Sanford Biggers uses the study of ethnological objects, popular icons, and the Dadaist tradition to explore cultural and creative syncretism, art history, and politics.

Sanford Biggers is the 2010 recipient of The Greenfield Prize at the Hermitage Artist Retreat. Biggers has been included in several notable shows such as Prospect 1, New Orleans Biennial, Illuminations at the Tate Modern, and Performa 07. He has also had solo exhibitions in Los Angeles, London, New York, Berkeley, Kansas City, Europe, and the Far East. Biggers’ installations, videos, and performances have appeared in venues worldwide including the Tate Britain, Tate Modern, the Whitney Museum, Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, as well as institutions in China, Germany, Hungary, Japan, Poland and Russia.

On Friday, March 30, his newest installation will be available to the public at Ringling Museum. Biggers will also be presenting, “Speaking of My Work” in the Ringling College Auditorium (Free and Open to the Public). We were fortunate to have a discussion with him, and are pleased to share it here.


Sanford Biggers
Sanford Biggers acceptance speech, 2010 Greenfield Prize reception dinner, courtesy of the Hermitage

sVA: Who are your peers [i.e. the people currently working that inform or influence your work] and how do their practices effect what you do?

SB: When I am not spending a lot of time with them, I am spending time with their work. Like artists Rashid Johnson and Julie Mehretu, between conversations, time with their work, there are a few areas where we are communicating or talking about the same thing visually and some of them in different ways. It is almost as if there is a type of collaborative understanding. I think we do these semi-narrative sculptures, photos, and installations. There is a real autobiography in there somewhere. I would like to believe that we are developing a language that has some ancillary responses to each others work.

sVA: What about a non-linear peer group across time and media [e.g. history]?

SB: Let’s see, recently I have been listening to a lot of Sun Ra and Thelonious Monk. I would definitely consider them to be astronauts that are marching, and recently in terms of writers, Diaz.

sVA: Do you see yourself as more of a producer of, or responder to, theory?

SB: I would say that I am a producer of theory as opposed to a responder. I think that is the role of the artist. We can be informed by multiple sources, but in the end we have to create something. I don’t want to say that the pressure is totally new, but definitely unique, idiosyncratic, and a different voice.

Sanford Biggers
"Sweet Funk—An Introspective" at the Brooklyn Museum

sVA: And how do you balance the two?

SB: I think it is good to be knowledgeable of the ideas that are out there, theory and things that are being tossed around between people. I also think at some point, that could be a point of departure, but it can’t be the end goal.

sVA: Would you consider that to be advice for younger artists?

SB: Absolutely, and I deal with grad and under grad students that are influenced by theory and the things that they are reading. They end up just trying to illustrate those concepts. I think that does a disservice to the concepts by trying to ground them. It also does a disservice to the artist by giving them too tight of a framework to work within.

sVA: What happens to an artist and their work when they begin to garner support from institutions?

SB: Hopefully it enables the artist to do more ambitious projects. I do a lot of site specific work. For example at the Ringling, I respond to an installation that might be there, or the history of the Museum, so that creates a framework. On a larger level I think it is a relationship where the artists experience their vision and to the museum, or the institution. The institution shares that with the community, and hopefully the community gives feedback that propels the artist forward next time for the next project.

Sanford Biggers
"The Cartographer's Conundrum" at MASS MoCA

sVA: Why do you u think there’s such a strong community-oriented push in visual art?

SB: I think it is because of culture. Communities should, and hopefully do, want to promote that culture. When a community gets behind an artist or an institution, its almost saying, “We are receiving your information and want to spread it around here and support you in the next place you go”. These institutions often have relationships with other institutions outside of the state, or outside of the country, so any community behind a project, once their project is done continues (i.e Paris to Sarasota, Sarasota to Paris that type of thing). I believe there is a reciprocal relationship.

sVA: Are there any real dangers of art that involves politics, and if so what do you think constitutes and perpetuates those dangers?

SB: No, not really, if anything I wish there were more politics in art.

sVA: Are you using any new mediums in your installation at the Museum?

SB: Yes, the new installation will be comprised of large drawings done on re-purposed quilts. Also some sculptures made of cotton.

Sanford Biggers
Nadine Robinson and Sanford Biggers, BSWC installation view, Berlin

sVA: What is your impressions of Sarasota and the Hermitage? Has Florida and/or Sarasota inspired you and your work?

SB: The Hermitage is fantastic! It is a great place to go and meditate. A great place to let the hustle and bustle of the city fall off of you. It has gorgeous visuals of the water and Floridian surroundings. I have been to Sarasota a few times. It seems like a very close-nit community. However, I have not spent as much time as I would like to there. In fact, I have only spent two days there. But when I come back, I will be staying there for a week. I am sure I will get a little more of an impression then.

sVA: How has it been so far working with the Museum and the art community of Sarasota?

SB: It’s been really good. I started to form a relationship with Matthew McLendon, the curator at the Ringling Museum. He has been very good and has a great eye. I also met some other people that live in Sarasota that I have become friends with. We hang out in New York sometimes. I have not had the chance to meet so much of the art community yet, but I believe I will the next time I am down.

sVA: Besides the lectures, installations, interviews and more, do you have any other plans of things to do during your visit to Sarasota?

SB: I would really like to try to make it to the beach.

Sanford Biggers
Sanford Biggers, Ghetto Bird Tunic, 2006, BSWC, Berlin

Introducing Thursday Night’s Leaders: 10×10

March 15 will host a lecture series by 10 of Sarasota’s local creative leaders. Sarasota Visual Art gives a look into who these people are ahead of time as a visual amuse-bouche to Thursday’s event.

The intention of this event is to showcase and introduce a diverse group of leaders from the local creative community. Each speaker will present 10 images. The images will automatically advance every 30 seconds. In 300 seconds and 10 images, each speaker will give us an overview of their background, current work, or interests. Scroll down for time and location.


Carl Abbott (Architect)

Carl AbbottCarl Abbott’s Architecture has been recognized internationally — for the past four decades his office has been one of the most highly awarded firms in the Florida / Caribbean Region. Carl is also a member of the original Sarasota School of Architecture. Among his many recognitions, Carl is a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects and has been awarded the AIA Florida Caribbean / Region’s Medal of Honor for Design and the Architectural Firm Honor Award. The University of Florida recognized him as a Distinguished Architectural Alumnus. He has taught and lectured in many places including Yale, Harvard and the World Monument Foundation.¬ From Yale, Carl received his Masters with studies under Paul Rudolph, Vincent Scully, Louis Kahn (University of Florida), a Bachelors with studies under Bill Stewart, Buckminster Fuller. He has worked in Hawaii, in New York with I.M. Pei, and in London with Yale classmates Richard Rogers and Norman Foster.
Ann Albritton (Art Historian) Ann AlbrittonPh. D., teaches contemporary art history and women artists in history among other art history subjects at the Ringling College of Art and Design. She’s taught in France, Eastern Europe, New York, Washington State and Ohio. She also publishes articles, writes reviews and presents papers for major art conferences.. For two years, between 1993 and 1995, Ann Albritton, Ringling College of Art and Design, taught modern and contemporary art history at the Grigorescu Academy of Art (now the National University of Fine Arts) in Bucharest, Romania.

View our featured article here: Interview with Ann Albritton

Dasha Reich (Artist) Dasha ReichAndrea Dasha Reich was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia, in a creative and progressive environment. Her Father was a lawyer and political activist and her mother was a graduate of the Academy of Applied Arts in Prague. She was raised in a Bauhaus designed apartment building filled with inspiring original artwork of that era. When her family relocated to Israel in 1960, Dasha studied art and design at the Bezalel Academy of Art in Jerusalem, under renowned modernist painters Yossi Stern and Moshe Rosenthalis.

After emigrating to the United States in 1966, Dasha enjoyed successful careers working in fashion design, accessories, home furnishing, textile design, tableware, and commercial space design. Her abstract paintings reflect her travels to Eastern and Western Europe, the Orient, the Middle East, and Mexico, and she draws inspiration from various aspects of our inter-connected, global culture.

Jeannie Perales, (Director of Education Selby Gardens) Jeannie PeralesJeannie Perales has been the Director of Education at The Marie Selby Botanical Gardens since 2010. Prior to that, she was a Museum Educator at The Denver Art Museum followed by The John & Mable Ringling Museum of Art. A Florida native, Jeannie returned to her hometown of Sarasota in 2005 after giving birth to her first child in Spain. With degrees in Communications, Cultural Anthropology and Educational Psychology coupled with her museum experience, Ms. Perales’ skill is in feeding information to the public in digestible bites through informal programs such as lectures, tours, interactive elements, and classes. Professionally, she’s spent twelve years in art museums and botanical gardens working with content specialists to design programs for visitors. A self-proclaimed generalist, Jeannie claims that “although not an authority on any one topic, I am an educator which means that the only thing I like more than information is sharing it in accessible and fun ways.” Ms. Perales lives in Sarasota with her husband, Daniel Perales and their two children, Kique, 6 ½ and Lucia, 5.
Kevin Dean (Artist, Selby Gallery Director) Kevin DeanB.A., M.A., Director of Selby Gallery, Co-Coordinator of American Humanities. He has written for the Galesburg Registered Mail, Chicago’s New Art Examiner, Longboat Observer, Bradenton Herald, Sarasota Magazine, Art Voices Magazine, Sarasota Arts Review and numerous exhibition catalog essays. In 1985 Dean began teaching studio and art history at Sarasota’s internationally-renown Ringling College of Art and Design and became the director of the art college’s Selby Gallery nine years later where he now works today.
Maribeth Clark (Musicologist) Maribeth ClarkNew College – Associate Professor of Music, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, M.A., University of North, Carolina at Chapel Hill, B.M. (Musicology), Rice University

In both her research and teaching, Professor Clark moves among the disciplines of musicology (music history), ethnomusicology (anthropology of music), and dance history, striving to demonstrate the ways that experiences of music are culturally constructed and historically situated.

Most of Professor Clark’s research has focused on French opera and ballet of the nineteenth century; however, she has recently developed strong interests in representations of nature in music and the tradition of music education at Lutheran liberal arts colleges. She teaches on a wide range of topics in music history, including courses on the history of opera and music and the environment.

Dr. Matthew McLendon, (Ringling Museum Curator) Associate curator of modern and contemporary art is responsible not only for overseeing all aspects of the museum’s permanent collection from 1850 onward, but also curating new exhibits. Prior to his appointment, Dr. McLendon, a native Floridian, was appointed the first Curator of Academic Initiatives at The George D. and Harriet W. Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College. Dr. Matthew McLendon is an alumnus of Florida State University where he received Bachelor of Art degrees in both Art History and Music. While at FSU, he was the first intern in the department of Interpretation and Education at Tate Britain, London. After graduating Phi Beta Kappa, Dr. McLendon returned to London to study at the Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London where he received his MA and PhD.

View our featured article here: Interview with Matthew McLendon

Matt Walsh, (CEO and Editor Observer Group) Matt WalshBorn in St. Louis, Walsh is a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism and attended the University of Kansas Graduate School of Business. Matt Walsh is CEO and co-owner of The Observer Group Inc. — publisher of the Gulf Coast Business Review, Gulf Coast Commercial, The Sarasota Observer, The Longboat Observer, The East County Observer, The South Sarasota Observer, The North Manatee Observer and Season magazine. Since then, through a combination of four startups and three small acquisitions, the company has grown from 18 employees to 60 and increased revenues more than sixfold.

The Observers are a group of free community weeklies that reach 200,000 readers per week in Sarasota and Manatee counties. The Review, in contrast, serves as highly targeted audience of 5,000 CEOs, entrepreneurs and business leaders from Tampa Bay to Naples and is the only weekly business paper covering the west coast of Florida.

Rick Rados (Architect / Painter) Rick RadosAIA studied art at the University of Tampa prior to transferring to the University of Florida to pursue an architectural degree. While there he also studied painting under Hiram Williams. He earned his architectural degree from the University of Florida in 1963 and became a registered Florida Architect in 1965.

His Architecture has received dozens of awards for design excellence and has been published in numerous periodicals, journals and books. He has been an adjunct faculty member in design studios and an occasional visiting critic at the Schools of Architecture at the University of Florida and the University of South Florida. He has been elected to the rank of “Distinguished Alumni” at the University of Florida School of Architecture and was awarded the 2003 “Medal of Honor” by the Tampa Bay area chapter of the American Institute of Architects.

During the course of his architectural practice he routinely utilized drawing and painting as instruments of architectural design research and development. In 2003 he closed his architecture practice and returned to painting. Currently, he is also a part time adjunct faculty member at the University of South Florida where he teaches a graduate level architectural design studio.

Uzi Baram (Anthropologist) Uzi BaramProfessor, Anthropology, Director, New College Public Archaeology Lab

Uzi Baram is an anthropologist who teaches a wide range of archaeology and cultural anthropology courses. As a New College professor, Professor Baram has moved his principle area of research from the eastern Mediterranean to the west coast of Florida. In the eastern Mediterranean he has studied the material culture, cultural landscapes, Western travel accounts, and social identities of the Ottoman Empire. Current research on the Middle East examines the intersection of archaeology and heritage tourism.


Where: State of the Art Gallery
1525 State Street, Sarasota, FL

Time: 5:30 – 6:00 p.m. Reception
6:00 – 7:00 p.m. Presentations

Cost: $10 tickets are available at the door or can be purchased at the State of the Art Gallery or by calling 955-2787, includes passed H’orderves and complimentary glass of wine.

Facebook Event RSVP: https://www.facebook.com/events/237161116373480/


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