Matthew Holler – Recent Photographs

February 3 – March 27, 2017
Opening Reception, Tuesday, February 7 (4:30 – 6:30PM)
Patricia Thompson Gallery, Sarasota

Matthew Holler’s fascination with photography and the fashion industry led him to earn his BFA from the Ringling College Department of Photography & Imaging and pursue a career as a fashion and portrait photographer in Sarasota and New York after graduation. Heavily influenced by early to mid-twentieth century photography, Holler draws inspiration from Richard Avedon, Robert Mapplethorpe and Helmut Newton. The selection of works in the exhibition by this dynamic fashion and portrait photographer represents a wide range of his photographic approaches from 2011-2016.

Matthew Holler
Matthew Holler

Read an interview conducted by exhibition curator Mark Ormond from November 2016
http://www.ringling.edu/sites/default/files/Questions%20for%20Matthew%20Holler.pdf


The Patricia Thompson Gallery hosts rotating exhibitions of work by Ringling College alumni.
Location: The historic Keating Center building on the Ringling College campus. One half block east of Highway 41 on Dr. Martin Luther King Junior Way in Sarasota.

Gallery Hours:
Monday thru Friday 8:30 – 4:30 pm

For further information:
www.ringling.edu/galleries
galleries@ringling.edu
941.359.7563

“Ordinary Things” by Pamela Beck

I had never thought of the world this way before; never imagined that every day objects and activities could be beautiful, creative and/or thought provoking depending on the context in which they were presented and an individual’s intention. Artists know this intuitively; it’s what they do and how they live.

Pamela Beck

Pamela Beck

There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.


When I was younger I often used to write my shopping lists on pieces of sturdy tree bark I’d find in the woods. (Don’t roll your eyes; I had a lot more time on my hands back then and my sister was a hippie.) When my doorknobs looked empty, I’d paint them to resemble a design you might find on a Clarice Cliff teapot. Leftover pieces of colorful ribbon were curled around cans in the pantry; masses of flowers were hung upside down to dry from a ceiling rack in the laundry room so that it felt like I was folding clothing in Alice’s Wonderland.

This all started because I was lucky enough to take a trip to Paris with my family when I was fourteen. As I straggled behind them on one of our daily walking tours, I happened upon a storefront grocer’s window. There I saw a small wooden crate, about 12 x 12 inches, standing upright but slightly tilted back for the viewer to see its contents easily. It was divided into nine squares, three per row. Nine green pears were displayed in their individual cubbyholes, every fruit nestled in crisp lavender tissue paper that peaked out around each pear. It stopped me dead in my tracks. The ordinary made extraordinary.

I had never thought of the world this way before; never imagined that every day objects and activities could be beautiful, creative and/or thought provoking depending on the context in which they were presented and an individual’s intention. Artists know this intuitively; it’s what they do and how they live. But up until that Paris-pear moment, I had relegated these kinds of experiences to the galleries and museums my parents took us to and had not connected its relevance to my everyday world.

I was reminded of this vital life approach when I visited the Postal Art exhibition, “The Unexpected: Art in Transit” at Ringling College’s Basch Gallery, up until November 28th. Organized and installed by six Ringling students enrolled in Professor Mark Ormond’s course “Contemporary Art and Role of the Curator”, the show began as a call to artists from the International Union of Mail Artists, a few of whom are included in this show (http://iuoma-network.ning.com/). Time constraints turned this into a loan exhibition representing fifty artists, but primarily art from the collections of Sandra Lefever and Sarah Carter.

The Unexpected: Art in Transit, The Basch Gallery, Ringling College Academic Center

On display is the correspondence (the artwork itself) that has been mailed between the artists in this show over several years. Some are shown on the wall or on stands. The most interesting displays have the correspondence dangling in clear frames suspended in the air like mobiles, so that both sides of the Postal Art can be seen. This is a highly effective and beautiful reminder of the art-in-transit theme of this exhibition.

The Unexpected: Art in Transit, The Basch Gallery, Ringling College Academic Center

It’s fascinating and a bit unsettling to view the private exchanges between the artists; it can feel like you’ve stumbled upon someone’s secrets but can’t look away. (Excluding the theme of ‘Save the USPS” which was a common thread.) Usually the artwork made by Postal Artists, is seen only by the sender and receiver. But the show’s curator/team leader, Van Jazmin, describes the public display of this artist to artist work as a “progressive step for Postal Art, ” usually considered somewhat of a “relatively underground movement in response to the Fluxus movement.”

http://www.behance.net/gallery/Fluxus-Manifesto/5136121
http://www.behance.net/gallery/Fluxus-Manifesto/5136121

A letter, a pear, just everyday things… it all depends on what you do with them.

Exhibition info:
-The Basch Gallery, Ringling College Academic Center, 2363 Bradenton Road, Sarasota

The Unexpected: Art in Transit Team: Curator/Team Leader, Van Jazmin; Registrar, Cindy Cherng; Graphic Designer, Kasia Dybek; Editor/Assistant for PR, Jordon Stone; Event organizer, Lauren Burger; Press Correspondent, Andrew Angstadt

Q & A with Sandra Lefever, Nov 14th, 4-6 PM,

Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/440169886019040/?fref=ts


To read more about Pamela, view these links:
http://srxq.blogspot.com/
http://whatdogsreallythink.blogspot.com/

Artists Who Made Sarasota Famous & The Story of the Sarasota Art Association

JANUARY 19, 2012 – March 10, 2012
Recognizing over 40 artists who established Art Center Sarasota as a dynamic and vital community art center, and chronicling the Art Association’s formative years through photography and unique memorabilia.

JANUARY 19, 2012 – March 10, 2012
Art Center Sarasota

Judy Axe in ACS galleries 1950s

Artists That Made Sarasota Famous exhibition will be on display in the Center’s Gallery One, recognizing over 40 artists who established Art Center Sarasota as a dynamic and vital community art center. These creative pioneers were the artistic force responsible for putting Sarasota on the map as one of Florida’s most vibrant cultural destinations. The exhibition offers a rich sampling of works by artists who settled into Sarasota and were active in the Sarasota Art Association during its early heyday. These works are on loan from the artists, their families, and local collectors. Among the varied subjects are portraits, landscapes, still life, non-representational and circus themes.

LBK Bridge - 1950s plein air classes instructor Robert Chase

The legacy of early Sarasota artists John Armstrong, Jack Cartlidge, Julio De Diego, Jerry Farnsworth, William Hartman, George Kaiser, Robert Larson, Hilton and Dorothy Leech, Frank Rampolla, Guy Saunders, Syd Solomon, Eric von Schmidt, Ben Stahl and others will be honored. Many of the artists on exhibit still reside in the Sarasota area today, including Beth Arthur, Judy Axe, Robert Chase, Fiore Custode, George Fox, Marty Hartman, Roy Nichols, Craig Rubadoux and Jan Silberstein.

Sarasota Art Association -Today' Art Center Sarasota 1964

The Story of the Sarasota Art Association 1926 – 1966 (today’s Art Center Sarasota) exhibition on display in the Center’s Gallery Two chronicles the Art Association’s formative years through photography and unique memorabilia. The focus of the exhibition is to tell the story of the vital connection between Sarasota’s Community Art Center, the artists’ community, the Ringling School of Art (today’s Ringling College of Art and Design), the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art and the Sarasota community, providing insight into the sensibility of the time. This exhibition will feature a series of bold and richly illustrated graphic displays telling Art Center Sarasota’s colorful story from its inception in 1926 through 1966. The exhibition includes an illustrated historical timeline and accompanying photographs. These exhibitions pay tribute to Art Center Sarasota’s success and spirit while celebrating its past achievements.

Sarasota Art Association- today's Art Center Sarasota -Original Building 1950s

This exhibition is curated by Heidi Anderson Connor, and co-curated by Mark Ormond. Connor is a certified archivist and Historical Collections Manager. She is a freelance archivist working with the Sarasota County History Center and the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art. She studied at Ringling College of Art & Design in the 70s, and spent 12 years as assistant to the American sculptor John Chamberlain. Connor was the Curator/Archivist for the Museum of Television and Radio exhibition, The Gentleman Giant: Leonard H. Goldenson, and the executor of the estate of artist David Budd. She completed her graduate work at USF and has a BFA from Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, FL.

logo Art Center Sarasota

Mark Ormond is currently the Curator of Exhibitions for Ringling College of Art and Design, has over 30 years of experience in the art world, and has organized, coordinated, designed and installed numerous museum exhibitions. Ormond has also edited, authored and contributed to many brochures, catalogues and publications on artists including Robert Rauschenberg, Francesco Clemente, Robert Thiele and Yayoi Kusama. He has held positions at the Miami Art Museum, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. As an independent curator, author, lecturer and consultant since 1999, Ormond remains engaged in a broad range of contemporary art projects.