Patrick Dougherty Selected for Ringling College’s “ARTmuse” Program

Internationally renowned sculptor Patrick Dougherty weaves large-scale architectural forms from trees, twigs, vines, and other natural materials. In January 2013, the artist will spend three weeks in Sarasota creating one of his unique sculptures on the grounds of the historic Sarasota High School and future home of the Sarasota Museum of Art/SMOA

Patrick Dougherty with his sculpture “Ruaille Buaille (Highjinx)” in County Offaly, Ireland; photo by James Fraher

Wendy G. Surkis, president of Sarasota Museum of Art/SMOA, a division of Ringling College of Art and Design, announced that renowned sculptor Patrick Dougherty will be here for SMOA’s 2013 “ARTmuse” program, January 7-26, 2013. His imaginative monumental sculptures made of trees, twigs, vines, and other natural materials can be seen around the world. During his three-week Sarasota project, the artist will build a site-specific installation on the grounds of the historic Sarasota High School, which will become the future home of the Sarasota Museum of Art/ SMOA. Surkis says the public will have many opportunities to view the artist at work—and watch his creation unfold and evolve. She encourages people to stop by the high school to see the work in progress.

“River Vessels” by Patrick Dougherty; Waco Cultural Arts Center, Waco, TX; photo by Mark Randolph

“This is a remarkable opportunity for our community,” says Surkis. “Patrick has exhibited his work around the world; we’re thrilled that he is coming here for SMOA. It’s an example of the fresh ideas SMOA will be bringing to Sarasota.” Surkis adds that it’s “pure joy to watch his creations come alive as he bends, twists and cajoles tree branches into large, dreamlike architectural forms that invite people to explore, wonder and wander through his amazing environments.”

“Close Ties” by Patrick Dougherty; Scottish Basketmakers Circle, Dingwall, Scotland; photo by Fin Macrae

Born in Oklahoma in 1945, Patrick Dougherty was raised in North Carolina and studied art history and sculpture at the University of North Carolina. Combining his carpentry skills with his love of nature, Dougherty began to learn more about primitive techniques of building and to experiment with tree saplings as construction material. In 1982, his first work, “Maple Body Wrap,” was included in the North Carolina Biennial Artists’ Exhibition, sponsored by the North Carolina Museum of Art. His work quickly evolved from single pieces on conventional pedestals to monumental scale environmental works, which required saplings by the truckloads. Over the last 30 years, he has built over 230 of these works, and become internationally acclaimed. Dougherty has received numerous awards, including the 2011 Factor Prize for Southern Art, North Carolina Artist Fellowship Award, Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant, Henry Moore Foundation Fellowship, Japan-US Creative Arts Fellowship, and National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship. Princeton Architectural Press published a major book, “Stickwork,” about the artist and his work in 2009. For more information about Patrick Dougherty, visit www.stickwork.net.

SMOA’s ARTmuse programs bring renowned artists and museum professionals to our region. According to Surkis, “They share their creative journey and impart a deep understanding of who they are, what they do and how they do it.” Surkis adds that these distinguished visitors give the public, “unique and meaningful learning experiences in an up-close-and-personal setting. Our enlightening programs provide Sarasota art enthusiasts a sense of what’s to come once SMOA is up and running.” Previous visiting artists have included Lesley Dill, Janet Echelman, Judy Pfaff and Seth Randal. This year’s Patrick Dougherty corporate sponsor is PNC Wealth Management.

Dougherty will participate in SMOA’s 2013 “ARTmuse” program, January 7-26, 2013. A celebratory first event, the “SMOA Inaugural Bash,” is Sunday, January 20, 2013, 6 p.m.-10 p.m., on the grounds of the historic Sarasota High School. The public is invited to meet the artist, enjoy libations and cuisine from The Sarasota-Manatee Originals, and enjoy the stirring sounds of Tampa’s premier dance band, Ace Factor. Tickets start at $125. For tickets and more information about this event, call 941-309-0118 and specify SMOA Inaugural Bash. For information about sponsorship and benefactor opportunities, contact Mary Lee Richey at 941-309-4732.

For more information about Sarasota Museum of Art/SMOA visit www.sarasotamuseumofart.org or call Wendy G. Surkis at 941-309-7662.

Graphicstudio’s 14th Annual Benefit Sale

Friday, October 12, 2012
GRAPHICSTUDIO, Tampa, FL

Hundreds of original, artist-signed, fine art prints and sculpture multiples are available at discounts from 10-60% off the regular list price. All sales benefit Graphicstudio¹s artists¹ residencies, continuing research and educational programming.

Friday, October 12, 2012
GRAPHICSTUDIO, Tampa, FL

10am – 9pm | Sale (6pm ­Reception)

The Graphicstudio Benefit Sale is a one-day-only event that will take place on Friday, October 12, 2012. Hundreds of original, artist-signed, fine art prints and sculpture multiples are available at discounts from 10-60% off the regular list price. All sales benefit Graphicstudio’s artists’ residencies, continuing research and educational programming. This once a year event includes work from world-renowned artists including Los Carpinteros, Chuck Close, Lesley Dill, Alex Katz, Robert Mapplethorpe, Christian Marclay, Vik Muniz, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Ed Ruscha, Janaina Tschäpe, William Wegman, and many others. There will be a FREE drawing at 8pm for St. Petersburg artist Robert Stackhouse’s Blue 5606!

Philip Pearlstein, View of Rome, 1986, Direct gravure/aquatint with roulette work, 41 ½” x 52”, Edition: 60, Images courtesy of Graphicstudio/USF, Photo Credit: Will Lytch

Some prints are the last available in inventory, with just one impression remaining. Techniques include traditional hand-printing processes such as relief, etching, photogravure, and lithography; digital printmaking; and technically advanced sculpture fabrication methods. Subject matter ranges from portrait to still life, representational to abstract, and all sizes Something for everyone at one-day-only prices. This event is free and open to the public. All major credit cards accepted, and all sales must be completed the day of the sale! Save the date: October 12th! Do you want to begin a collection of works by major contemporary artists, or maybe expand your current collection? Even if you just want to be an art collector one day a year! This is it! You don¹t want to miss the 14th Annual Graphicstudio Benefit Sale!

Please contact Kristin Soderqvist, Director of Sales and Marketing, for more information at (813) 974-5871 or at kristins@arts.usf.edu

About Graphicstudio

Graphicstudio is a university-based atelier engaged in a unique experiment in art and education. Founded in 1968 as a non-profit art making facility, Graphicstudio is committed to research and the application of traditional and new techniques for the production of limited edition prints and sculpture multiples.

James Rosenquist, Robert Rauschenberg, Ed Ruscha, Vik Muniz, Kiki Smith and other leading contemporary artists have been invited to work in collaboration with expert artisans in our studios to create works on paper and editions of sculptures in a variety of materials. Ongoing research by Graphicstudio has been remarkably productive and many new processes and treatments of traditional methods have been developed such as waxtype (encaustic screen printing) and heliorelief (a photographic woodblock process). Graphicstudio editions have been acquired by leading museums including the Museum of Modern Art, the New York Public Library and the Whitney Museum of American Art. The National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and the USF Contemporary Art Museum maintain complete archives of Graphicstudio editions. Graphicstudio also offers a Subscription Program.

Graphicstudio with the Contemporary Art Museum and the Public Art Program form the Institute for Research in Art in the College of The Arts at the University of South Florida.

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/graphicstudio/
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/graphicstudiofl/
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/irausf
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/irausf

GRAPHICSTUDIO | Institute for Research in Art
3702 Spectrum Boulevard,Suite 100
Tampa, Florida 33612
Info Line: (813) 974-3503 / fax: (813) 974-2579
www.graphicstudio.usf.edu


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Between the Lines: Word and Image from Graphicstudio

Thursday, March 29, 2012
Featuring works by Lesley Dill, Kiki Smith, Ed Ruscha, Arakawa, and others at St. Petersburg Eckerd College.

Thursday, March 29, 2012
Eckerd College, St. Petersburg, FL

Featuring works by Lesley Dill (Featured Interview), Kiki Smith, Ed Ruscha, Arakawa, and others.

Opening at 6pm in the Reception Fox Hall, continuing at 7pm for th eExhibition Tour Armacost Library. It is requested that you RSVP by March 22 by calling 727-864-7713 or email advancement@eckerd.edu.

Graphicstudio lesley dill
Lesley Dill | Poem Dress of Circulation | Multimedia assemblage lithographed | image courtesy of Graphicstudio
Graphicstudio Kiki Smith
Kiki Smith | The Vitreous Body | Book of 18 woodblock prints with text by Parmenides of Elea | image courtesy of Graphicstudio
Graphicstudio Kiki Smith
Kiki Smith | The Vitreous Body | Book of 18 woodblock prints with text by Parmenides of Elea | image courtesy of Graphicstudio

About Graphicstudio
Graphicstudio is a university-based atelier engaged in a unique experiment in art and education, committed to research and the application of traditional and new techniques for the production of limited edition prints and sculpture multiples. Graphicstudio with the Contemporary Art Museum and the Public Art Program form the Institute for Research in Art in the College of The Arts at the University of South Florida.

www.graphicstudio.usf.edu


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The Goods: Weekend News (02.03.12)

Sarasota Visual Art’s round up of information, upcoming exhibitions, and events. Bianca Pratorius, Gene Page, IV, Jack Gessley, Jack Gessley 3, James Griffin, Jennifer Basile, John Cage, Lesley Dill, Lester Jack Gessley III, Nathan Skiles, Palmetto Art Center, Sarasota, Sarasota Museum of Art, Sarasota paintings, Sooky Kim, Tempus Projects

Featured Content

A Conversation with Lesley Dill at the Sarasota Museum of Art
Sarasota Visual Art joined in on a Q & A with the Brooklyn artist at the future home of SMOA. The following are excerpts from this conversation with the artist.[…]
Lesley Dill
Lesley Dill, Poem Eyes #3, photo silkscreen shellac, thread on tea stained muslin, 152.5

Featured Artist: Nathan Skiles
Often when I’m asked if the clocks function my canned response is, “Yes, they do function, just like a painting of a clock functions” This ties directly to the question about my choice of working […]

Golem #1; cuckoo clock with tools, 2011, foam rubber, 15 x 14 x 11 inches

Olda Reviews: Things Not Seen Before
Nearly 100 years after his birth and 20 years since his death John Cage’s relevancy to the current creative world is as strong as it’s ever been. To be sure, Tempus Projects’ Things Not Seen Before […]

Among many others, art by Christian Marclay (guitar) and Andrew Deutsch (video)

Exhibitions

Two Doors Down – Works by Jennifer Basile and Bianca Pratorius
February 1 – An exhibition featuring mixed-media paintings and drawings at Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art.

UNTITLED FOUR - JENNIFER BASILE

James Griffin: Luminous Color, A Journey
February 3 – An exhibit showing “our paradise of light and color”, a masterful series of Sarasota paintings.

"Early Winter Morning- Sarasota Bay" by James Griffin, 32" x 50", oil on canvas

Senior Thesis Show – Jack Gessley and Sooky Kim
February 3, 2012 – Exhibition of works by Sooky Kim and Lester Jack Gessley III
FAR OUT: A Black Light Art Exhibit
February 4 – Original artwork created by 17 individual artists to be viewed under black lights!

Functions

Photography Symposium with Gene Page
February 4, 2012 (7:00pm) – Palmetto Art Center plays proud to host sixth generation Floridian and Manatee County native, photographer Gene Page, IV, for a symposium that chronicles the experiences that shaped his career as an artist and photojournalist.

A Conversation with Lesley Dill at the Sarasota Museum of Art

Sarasota Visual Art joined in on a Q & A with the Brooklyn artist at the future home of SMOA. The following are excerpts from this conversation with the artist.

January 21, 2012
Sarasota Museum of Art, 1000 North Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, FL

Lesley Dill
Portrait of Lesley Dill

In addition to its fundraising efforts, the Sarasota Museum of Art continues its tradition of arts programming this year with ARTmuse – a series of invitational events for donors that offer talks and demonstrations by acclaimed visiting artists and curators. Last week, the charming and very real American contemporary artist Lesley Dill visited the historic Sarasota High School and future home of SMOA. This particular event was organized by Ringling College’s faculty member Jill Lerner, SMOA board member Lois Stulberg, and was sponsored by PNC Wealth Management. To date, SMOA has raised exactly $13,924,629.83 -an incredible stride toward achieving its $22 million fundraising goal.

Sarasota Visual Art joined in on a Q & A with the Brooklyn artist at the future home of SMOA. The following are excerpts from this meeting.

Q: What artists influence you the most in your career?

LD: Giacometti, because of that strong fragility. He could make a real teeny, teeny, little person and yet there’s such strength. My early work that I rarely exhibit, I actually carved wood that looked like him. I was learning to be an artist, so you kind of apprentice yourself and get what you need from it. Later it was Giacometti, then Phillip Guston, and eventually Francis Bacon who made me realize, “O.K. I cannot do Giacometti because he has already done it”, so you get to that point where you want to enter the field because art is actually a research field- its not just about your feelings, what your childhood was about. When you enter into the art realm you are entering into a research field, and you are hoping to contribute some small sign – a symbol. So in response to not being able to do Giacometti, I thought, “You know, I can make clothing that is delicate and fragile and still have a feeling of strength for sculpture.” And it wasn’t a thought, it was like an, ‘ah ha!’ moment – you know and you just do it, you don’t think of the answer.

Lesley Dill
Lesley Dill, Poem Eyes #3, photo silkscreen shellac, thread on tea stained muslin, 152.5

Q: Have you given any consideration to the permanence of your work?

LD: Yes, I consider myself to be a very ethical artist. Paper is one of the most archival things. I use material with a pH acid balance to it so it really lasts a long time. I always try to work with excellent paper because of the pH balance.

Q: How were you discovered, what had you done?

LD: I didn’t live in New York until I was 30. I thought I’ll just apply to grad schools and my husband won’t mind. I got rejected from every school except the Maryland institute. Before that, I had five teaching jobs. You have to work; work to make money to support yourself, to make art you have to be ruthless and disciplined. After ten years of awful art I feel I got lucky. I went to galleries and made friends. Then I got accoladed with galleries. Its really important to exhibit your work.

Q: Where did your love of language develop?

LD: When I was a child. I was asthmatic when I was little, and even today I get sinus infections. I was a sickly child, so I read a lot. I read all of Nancy Drew, Little Women, and from that a world of secrets formed in my mind. I love that.

Lesley Dill
Lesley Dill, Word Queen of Poetry, wire, steel sculpture, 74

Q: What is your relationship to other languages?

LD: Living in New Delhi, India for two years was very influential to me. My husband had a job and we lived in a really nice neighborhood. Out in the streets was Hindi. A beautiful language … I allowed myself to not decipher it, I just let it be. I then started to love the presence of the language. I have found that traveling, and good friends from other places, that there is something great about someone that speaks in a language I have no access to.

Q: Do you make time for reading?

LD: “Oh my God!” I read all the time. That’s part of the engaged reverie. The reading is where my work comes from. That’s how I found home, from language. I read all kinds of things. I have been reading The Shedding Season. Now I’m interested in violence and gentleness, reading Steven Pinker’s new book. His earlier work is, “On Language”. I like to balance readings.

Q: What aspects of the contemporary art world would you change if you could?

LD: I can’t, I don’t mean to be rude. You know I am not a real socialite, you know there are people who love that and I am not much of that so maybe it should change itself. Honestly, I think the art world does recognize art. I believe that there is common knowledge that you look at it and you can do a group vote. When you have a museum and you don’t like something, or are mad at something you will have a group vote- you will find you have clubs. You will have a color club, you will have a political club, there will be the sexual weird club. Art is a big wide philosophy that invites you, it is also a place of silence like a museum.

Lesley Dill
Lesley Dill, Eye Drop, Copper, woood, thread, ink on handmade paper, 48

ABOUT LESLEY DILL
Lesley Dill is one of the most prominent American artists working at the intersection of language and fine art. Her work is delicately crafted and emotionally evocative. She magnificently defines the soul of the written word in an inspired visual language of her own imaginative devising.

Inventing new uses for a variety of unusual materials, Lesley’s unique creations amaze the viewer with their compelling emotional presence.

Her magnificent gowns of paper, wire or metal speak a language that is punctuated with awe. She has a magical way of making language visible to the mind, the eye and the soul.

Lesley Dill
Lesley Dill, Copper Poem Hands, 1994, Copper and Wire, 62 x 20 x 2 inches

Lesley is a renowned sculptor, print maker, photographer and performance artist.

Her work can be found in numerous permanent collections; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art, in New York City; the Albright Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo; the Cleveland Museum of Art; the Kemper Museum, Kansas City to name a few.

For more information about the SMOA visit: http://www.ringling.edu/index.php?id=smoa

Lesley Dill visit: http://www.lesleydill.net/