I never thought so much could change. Tempus Projects Group Exhibit

January 11 – February 8, 2013
Tempus Projects, Tampa, FL

Join Tempus Projects for its first exhibition of 2013. I never thought so much could change, a themed exhibition of sentimentality & adaptation-based works is scheduled to open Friday, January 11 from 7-10pm. This exhibition features work from Linda Armstrong, Becky Flanders, Lauren Garber Lake, Gigi Lage, Noelle Mason, Ryann Slauson, Sabrina Small and Julie Weitz. Tempus brings these artists together for a diverse exhibition of drawing, painting, video, photography and sculpture all exploring various interpretations of bathos and acclimation.

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The event is free and open to the public but donations are greatly appreciated. Refreshments and light hors d’oeuvres while they last. Feel free to BYOB. Classes and groups are encouraged and welcomed. This exhibition will run from January 11, 2013 through February 8, 2013 with gallery hours by appointment.

TEMPUS PROJECTS is dedicated to nurturing established and emerging local, national and international artists through exhibitions and events. The project promotes artists working in all media and originates, organizes, and hosts exhibitions that engage the Tampa Bay community through the visual arts. Established in 2009 TEMPUS PROJECTS has presented over 32 exhibitions featuring the work from more than 170 artists and collaborators.

Located on Florida Avenue in a converted garage, on the back lot of a commercial property in South Seminole Heights, TEMPUS PROJECTS is highly regarded as cultural catalyst and a neighborhood touchstone. It has contributed greatly to the district’s emergence as a unique and creative local destination. In acknowledgment of its contributions to the arts and the community, Tampa’s Creative Loafing has awarded it the Best Alternative Art Space Loafie’s award for three years in a row. TEMPUS PROJECTS has worked in collaboration with Experimental Skeleton, Silver Meteor Gallery, Tampa’s Downtown Partnership & Creative Loafing.

What: I never thought so much could change.
Public reception/art exhibition, hors d’oeuvres and drinks.

When: Friday, January 11, 2013
7-10pm

Where: Tempus Projects
5132 N. Florida Ave.
Tampa, FL 33603

For additional information about Tempus Projects and this event, visit their website: www.tempus-projects.com or contact Tracy Midulla Reller at tempusprojects.art@gmail.com or 813.340.9056

5132 N. Florida Ave, Tampa, Florida 33603

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Interview with Kim Anderson: Material Matters

sVA had the pleasure of speaking with artist and curator Kim Anderson of Material Matters: A Look at Medium and Method, about the show.

Opening November 3, Art Center Sarasota will present a fascinating exhibition in the galleries titled Material Matters: A Look at Medium and Method. Given the sheer breadth and depth of each work this exhibition is a must see. Participating artists include: Lauren Garber-Lake, John Westmark, Malaika Zweig, Erika Mahr, Leslie Robison and Jason Mitcham

Malaika Zweig

sVA had the pleasure of speaking with artist and curator Kim Anderson of Material Matters: A Look at Medium and Method, about the show.

sVA: What criteria did you use when selecting the artists and/or artwork for Material Matters?

KA: I wanted to show work by artists who push a material or conflate unexpected media, but who also demonstrate a devout investment to the execution of their work. It was important to me that the artists dedicate a significant amount of labor and energy to their work. I also selected artists whose work would be new to Sarasota.

365 Pages by Erika Mahr

sVA: What should the public expect from Material Matters? Do you think this show will appeal to a particular audience?

KA: I believe art has the capacity to reach different audiences for different reasons. I hope that those engaged with the art making process will have an appreciation for the commitment these artists have to the studio, and that others might uncover an unexpected idea for what a painting or drawing could be; an alternative presentation for painting, or how a drawing can be monumental and intimate simultaneously.

sVA: What are some of your expectations for the show? How do you think it will be received?

KA: It is my hope that the individual work supports and enhances the whole. It’s hard to say until everything is installed, so in that sense there are always variables. Some of the work is more nuanced and some bolder. I wasn’t interested in a stylistic thread, yet I am hoping for cohesiveness. What I like about the work is that it reveals itself over time. There is an immediate allure on first impression, but in each of the works the artist presents opportunities for extended contemplation. In terms of how it will be received, that will have to be determined.

Unsettled by Erika Mahr

sVA: As curator of this show, how is this show important to you?

KA: I found just as much of a creative satisfaction curating the show as I get from working in the studio. Curating gives me an opportunity to think differently about my own working process and ultimately how my work might be received.

sVA: How does your work as a curator inform your practice as an artist and vice versa?

KA: I am fortunate to be working with a talented and cooperative group of artists. I think this definitely gives me insight into what a curator is looking for from an organizational standpoint. Most of the work presented in the exhibition is different from my studio practice, and I appreciate the variety of creative approaches each artist pursues.

Jason Mitcham

sVA: How important do you think the discourse of contemporary art is?

KA: I think that is what art is about. Art is about asking questions and engaging a dialog. By challenging or investigating conventions contemporary art helps promote an on-going sense of discovery, contemplation, and understanding. I think these are all important things.

sVA: What role does this work play in our community?

KA: I think that the work is accessible, while it is also challenging in its execution, use of material, or exploration of a concept. I hope that people will feel motivated to begin looking more closely or be invigorated to reengage their own studio practice.

Lauren Garber Lake

Material Matters – Art Center Sarasota

November 3 – December 31, 2011
Art Center Sarasota

Art Center Sarasota will present a new exhibition in the galleries titled Material Matters from November 3- December 31, 2011. The opening reception, which is free and open to the public, will be held on November 3 from 5-7pm. Physically, and/or conceptually, material is integral to the creative process of all visual artists. Material Matters celebrates the use of materials from our modern world in the visual arts.

In the galleries: Improbable Fruit: Unfinished Explorations in Pursuit of a Materially Complex Built Environment (Architect Mark Weston’s laser cut wood sculptures); A National Show of Encaustic Work, curated by Elena De La Ville; Material Matters: A Look at Medium and Method, curated by Kim Anderson; and Material World- the all media, juried exhibition.

About:
A National Show of Encaustic work (WOMEN AND WAX) will feature the works of leading artists in the field that are dedicated to the innovation of contemporary art and ideas. The aim of the exhibit is to provide a platform for dialogue and education while increasing the understanding and appreciation for encaustic art in Southwest Florida.

Encaustic is one of the oldest forms of painting where beeswax, resin and pigment are layered and fused to produce a luminous surface that captures and transforms light. These artists melt, layer, scrape, and sculpt, creating their individual visions in wax.

Invited artists: Karen Freeman, Joanne Mattera, Jane Allen Nodine, Nancy Natale, Neverne Covington, Binnie Birstein, Lisa Pressman, Laura Moriarty, Diana González Gondolfi, Catherine Nash, Elena De La Ville

Material Matters: A Look at Medium and Method curated by Kim Anderson
Participating Artists: Lauren Garber-Lake, John Westmark, Malaika Zweig, Erika Mahr, Jason Mitcham

About Art Center Sarasota:
Art Center Sarasota offers creative opportunities that are affordable and accessible to the entire community with approximately 27 exhibitions, 100 classes and educational programs for youth and adults and special events each year. Art Center Sarasota engages the entire artistic community by providing educational programs and exhibitions for the novice to accomplished artists and those who simply enjoy the visual arts. The Center showcases hundreds of emerging and established artists through curated and juried exhibitions throughout each exhibition season. Through an extensive education department, learners at Art Center Sarasota can take advantage of many art classes, workshops and artist demonstrations with nationally known and popular local instructors that appeal to every age and skill level. The education department also offers various programs such as lectures, panel discussions and films. Youth programs and Creative Kids Summer Art Camp nurture young, developing minds. The youth outreach program, Slice of Art, is an interactive experience for students K-12, is funded by grants and donations at no cost to the schools. It has become a valuable tool for arts educators.

Art Center Sarasota
Gallery Hours:
10am – 4pm Tuesday-Saturday
Closed Sunday and Monday

Art Center Sarasota
707 N. Tamiami Trail
Sarasota, FL 34236
Phone 941-365-2032
Fax 941-366-0585
www.artsarasota.org