Noir et Blanc, Florence Putterman

April 5 – April 27, 2013
Dancing Crane Gallery, Bradenton FL

Sarasota artist presents monotypes, etchings, lithographs, linocuts, woodcuts, and sculptures.

April 5 – April 27, 2013
Dancing Crane Gallery, Bradenton FL

Sarasota artist presents monotypes, etchings, lithographs, linocuts, woodcuts, and sculptures.

Noir et Blanc, Florence Putterman
Noir et Blanc, Florence Putterman

www.dancing-crane.com
941.744.1333 / artgallery@dancing-crane.com

1019 10th Avenue West, Bradenton, FL 34205

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“Childhood Dreams” by Pamela Beck

As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up? Can you remember? Did you have secret aspirations that were pushed aside or were you able to pursue what came naturally?

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her new column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.

As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up? Can you remember? Did you have secret aspirations that were pushed aside or were you able to pursue what came naturally?

I’ve asked five artists with ties to the Sarasota area, to recall their earliest recollections of “feeling” like an artist. These artists were able to follow their initial instincts (with or without encouragement) and have shared their childhood memories below:


Florence Putterman

“Before my school years, in nice weather I was bundled up and placed daily in our backyard to get fresh air. I was about eleven years old and I complained that I had nothing to do there. My mother said ‘Knock your head against the wall.’ It was during these episodes in the yard that I started to doodle and mutilate our fence with whatever makeshift tool I could find, producing my own special graffiti. Years later I would be studying the petroglyphs of the Southwestern Indians and wondering if these rock carvings came into being because the Anasazi mothers chased their young ones out of their cave dwellings to get fresh air.” Florence Putterman

Bird, Hand and Man by Florence Putterman, Acrylic, Sand on Cavas, 40″x48″

Sabrina Small

“It’s hard to pin down one experience that sealed my future as an artist. I do remember always wanting to make drawings, though. Having a box of crayons, magic markers and a big fat coloring book kept me quiet for hours. Toss in some Shrinky Dinks, Doodle Art and Black Light posters, and, well, it really didn’t get much better than that.

I never considered art making as a career path- it was just something I always loved doing. The challenge now is to lose myself in the process, in the way I did as a child, keeping my worries about the future, money, health, etc. at bay. Not an easy task, sadly, but something I’m continuously striving towards.” Sabrina Small

The Other Half by Sabrina Small, Charcoal, Pastel and Pencil on paper, 22″x18″

R.O. Woody

“I was eleven years old and in fifth grade in a small town in Virginia. I had drawn and painted for as long as I can remember. In fifth grade I had an art teacher who taught how to exactly imitate what she did. Hated it. Never took another art course until my junior year in college. But I continued to draw and paint what I wanted at home. I can recall one day in the fifth grade, when I spent almost the whole day making “banners” — large, about three feet by three feet, pieces of cotton cloth colored with heavy crayon. The images were of very intense colors in abstract, geometric, eclectic designs. When I finished seven of these I thought: ” These are good! I am an artist — or will be.” My parents and friends didn’t “understand” or like them at all.

At the same time I was designing and writing a local “newspaper”. Local gossip. Amazing how much influence parents, teachers and friends have at an early age. My first degree is in journalism with a minor in art and photo-journalism. However I kept that early revelation deep within. I went back and eventually got my bachelors and masters degrees in art when I found I could not say, or express, what I really wanted with words. I finally made it to New York about 20 years later and met the New York artist Nicholas Krushenick, one of the forerunners of Pop Art. My banners were almost exactly like Krushenick’s work. He was very successful with that direction. I had moved on to another.” R.O. Woody

Blues Dance by R.O. Woody, Acrylic on canvas, 48″x72″

Jorge Blanco

“My dedication to art is an uncontrollable impulse, a passion; it is simply a part of myself. One of my earliest childhood memories is of the delight in drawing, creating shapes and coloring. It was a normal thing; I simply continued doing it.

When I was 12 years old, I saw an abstract painting by the French Cubist, Auguste Herbin, hanging at my best friend’s home in Caracas, Venezuela. (This family had an incredible modern art collection.) The painting made a lasting impression of pleasure and inspiration. This was the day I decided to study to become a professional artist.” Jorge Blanco

Sunrise by Jorge Blanco, Painted Aluminum, 97″x66″x24″, 2012

Joanna Coke

“My parents were separated when I was very young. At the age of nine, I moved in with my mother. I believe as a way to make this move, and living with her more acceptable, she took me to art lessons (without my siblings). It was just my mother and me- having a special time together.

So on Saturday mornings, my mother and I traveled to a local art center. She would paint in the adjacent room that was set up for live portrait painting in oils and I was with other kids of similar age, drawing whatever my instructor demonstrated. In my first two lessons I was introduced to all kinds of drawing materials. I loved getting all black on my hands and face with the charcoal sticks. I know I stayed late after each session because my mother would come and get me when she was done. In the third session, I recall finishing early and was so excited with my results that I wanted to show them to my mother right away. I saw her painting at her easel and she liked what I had done, but only then did I look up to see what she was painting. It was my first experience of seeing a nude man in a “g-string.”

I have been in love with drawing the nude figure ever since. I really knew then, at that early age, that I wanted to be an artist as a profession.” Joanna Coke

Yin by Joanna Coke, Mixed Media on canvas, 44″x44″


To read more about Pamela, view these links:
http://srxq.blogspot.com/
http://whatdogsreallythink.blogspot.com/

Artists Who Made Sarasota Famous- Part II at Art Center Sarasota

October 18 –December 7, 2013
Art Center Sarasota, Sarasota FL

On view will be a retrospective of artists in Sarasota who rose to prominence beginning in the 1960’s and continuing on to those who are still actively creating new works today.

October 18 –December 7, 2013
Art Center Sarasota, Sarasota FL

Art Center Sarasota is opening three new exhibitions on Thursday, October 18, 2012.

In Galleries One and Two, “Artists Who Made Sarasota Famous- Part II”, will showcase the second half of an exhibition of Sarasota Artists in the galleries earlier this year. The exhibition is curated by Dave and Patricia Dabbert of the Dabbert Gallery in Sarasota.

“The Rehersal” by William Jerdon, Oil on Canvas, Courtesy of the Dabbert Gallery

On view will be a retrospective of artists in Sarasota who rose to prominence beginning in the 1960’s and continuing on to those who are still actively creating new works today. All of these artists have been part of keeping Sarasota noted as a destination for arts and culture. Their work is found in important collections locally, nationally and internationally. This exhibition is important not only visually but historically as a chronicle of visual arts in the community.

“Encounter and Remy” by Craig Rubadoux, Oil on Canvas, Courtesy of the Dabbert Gallery

Complete list of artists in the exhibition:
Joan Altabe, Jean Blackburn, Jorge Blanco, David Budd, Clyde Butcher, Jack Cartlidge, John Chamberlain, Robert Chase, Frank Colson, Jeff Cornell, Kevin Costello, Kevin Dean, Julee Docking, Jack Dowd, Frank Eliscu, Jerry Farnsworth, Patrick Fiore, Larry Forgard, Gale Fulton Ross, Tim Jaeger, William Jerdon, Steven Katzman, Dennis Kowal, Jill Hoffman-Kowal, Nat Krate, Leslie Lerner, Barbara Mc Cann, Joseph Melancon, Moe Mitchel, Florence Putterman, Vicky Randall, Dasha Reich, Anthony Rice, Craig Rubadoux, Helen Sawyer, Syd Solomon, Ben Stahl, David Steiner, Julie Trigg, Thorton Utz and Susan Zukowsky

“Coast” by Barbara McCann, Acrylic/Oil on Canvas, Courtesy of the Dabbert Gallery

Featured in the Main Galleries is the open, all media, juried show “It’s Political” which was timed to coincide with this year’s election. This juried exhibition invites artists to challenge themselves and create a special politically themed piece. Artists have always been the ones to hold a mirror up to society in an effort to bring about change and this exhibition is sure to hold true to that tradition. Jurors for this exhibition are Marty Fugate, Arts Writer for the Herald Tribune & Kim Russo Working Artist and Former Head of the Ringling College Fine Arts Department. Art Center Sarasota has invited politicians running in the current election to greet guests at the opening reception on October 18, which is free and open to the public from 5-7pm. Lite bites will be provided by Jimmy Johns and the DeSoto Beach Club. Confirmed politicians who will be attending the opening include: Liz Alpert, John Torraco, Ed Brodsky, Greg Steube, Adam Tebrugge, Doug Holder and a representative for Ray Pilon.

In Gallery 3 is an exhibition by the Sarasota, Florida Chapter of the Sumi-é Society of America. This exhibit runs from October 18 – November 9, 2012.

(A new Exhibition, “The Curated Unknowns” will be in this gallery from November 14 – December 7, 2012)
The Sumi-é (or “ink painting” in Japanese) Society of America’s mission is to foster and encourage an appreciation of East Asian brush painting techniques and serve as a cultural bridge between East and West. This exhibition showcases the talents of Sarasota’s Sumi-é Society. As a part of the exhibition, artists involved in this show will also be hosting a special lecture about Sumi-é painting and its history, as well as a demonstration on November 2 at 2pm. http://www.sarasotasumi-e.org/

These exhibitions were paid for in part by the Sarasota County Tourist Development Tax Revenues
Art Center Sarasota | 707 N. Tamiami Trail | Sarasota 34236 | 941-365-2032 | www.artsarasota.org


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Wild 3: Artists and Animals of Myakka

April 12 – May 24, 2012
Featuring an exciting presentation of paintings, original prints, drawings and photographs deciphering the fauna of the Myakka River wilderness by prominent artists.

April 12 – May 24, 2012
Longboat Key Center for the Arts

Myakka River State Park has been a beloved natural destination for decades in southwest Florida. To assist the park in its effort to protect, restore and preserve this fifty-seven miles of wetlands, prairies and woodlands, notable artists from the region have come together creating artwork inspired by their vision of native Florida culminating in this thought provoking exhibition.

LBKC - myakka

Featuring an exciting presentation of paintings, original prints, drawings and photographs deciphering the fauna of the Myakka River wilderness by many prominent artists including Craig Rubadoux, Florence Putterman, and Jean Blackburn as well as a curated show featuring many outstanding local artists. The artwork includes mammals, birds, reptiles and fish presented in the realm of abstraction and expressive interpretation.

The Friends of Myakka River partners with the Florida Park Service to assist with protecting, restoring and preserving the natural and cultural resources of Myakka River State Park and the “Wild and Scenic” river. This exhibition showcases the natural beauty of the park’s fauna and the exceptional talent of regional artists. The project was designed to connect the Sarasota areas’s community of artists to the extraordinary natural environment of the Myakka River watershed.