Florida Soliloquy by Cecile Moran

Feb. 25 – March 30, 2012
Solo exhibition of paintings embodying a sense of energy displayed through the interaction of brilliant colors. The images are created by layering and resistance techniques.

Feb. 25 – March 30, 2012
Art Uptown, Sarasota, FL

A prolific painter, Cecile’s paintings embody a sense of energy displayed through the interaction of brilliant colors. The images are created by layering and resistance techniques. Paint is applied and removed in selected areas to reveal new and different color relationships.

“Florida is a land of contrasts, extreme weather, differing cultures and diverse tropical terrain and flora. The large expanse of ever-changing skies and the strong horizontal impact of the landscape excite the senses and provide the impetus for my painting,” noted the artist. “I have always been intrigued by the shapes and patterns of natural forms.”

She graduated with a BFA from Boston University College of Fine Arts and an MA in Art Education from California State University. She also studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Cecile’s work is found in public and private collections throughout the United States, Canada and Spain.

As a teaching artist, her life experiences have taken her to diverse locations, from California, New York and Florida to Spain, where she lived and taught for three years. She resided in Tampa for 20 years teaching with Adult, Technical and Community College art programs before moving to Sarasota in 1998.

During this period she was one of five finalists nominated for Adult Education “Teacher of the Year.” She has brought art education to all age levels from Kindergarten to College. In Sarasota, she has conducted art and educational programs for at-risk youth. She currently gives painting workshops and demonstrations in Tampa and Sarasota.

Cecile Moran, a long-time member of Art Uptown, is a past-president of the gallery and serves on the Board. She formerly served as president of the Art Teachers Association of Long Beach and organized conferences for the Southern California Art Education Association.

Hunter Payne – Let’s Draw Underwater!

January 27 – February 18, 2012
Multimedia artist Hunter Payne will take humanity back into the ocean as he dives off the deep end for his next art exhibit, Let’s Draw Underwater, running Jan. 27 through Feb. 18 at The Studio@620. The Grand Opening will be Jan. 27 from 7 to 10 p.m. and will include the first viewing of the project’s accompanying documentary. Admission is free.

January 27 – February 18, 2012
The Studio @ 620, St. Petersburg, FL

Multimedia artist Hunter Payne will take humanity back into the ocean as he dives off the deep end for his next art exhibit, Let’s Draw Underwater, running Jan. 27 through Feb. 18 at The Studio@620. The Grand Opening will be Jan. 27 from 7 to 10 p.m. and will include the first viewing of the project’s accompanying documentary. Admission is free.

Let’s Draw Underwater will feature hundreds of drawings created entirely underwater by Payne, accompanied by a documentary of his adventures in the Florida Keys where all the work for the exhibit was produced.

“If it doesn’t seem like it’s possible, that’s the project I need to do,” Payne said. “That’s where life’s fun. The ideas that scare me, the ones that I know will most likely be a failure, those are the ones I want to put my energy towards. Drawing underwater? Florida Keys? That’s an idea, man.”

According to Payne, the Grand Opening on January 27 will include, “Free admission, chocolate milk, a lot of weird art, the very first look at the documentary, and other awesome secret things that would be anticlimactic if I gave them away. I will also be autographing sports jerseys all night.”

To fund the project, 21-year-old Payne took an unlikely and truly 21st century approach to raise the $1,000 needed to purchase Mylar paper and art supplies that work in saltwater, an underwater video camera to shoot footage for the documentary, and boat transportation to the dive sites. He made a plea on kickstarter.com, an online community focused on funding creative projects. Payne’s pitch was so intriguing and different that strangers donated $1,292 in less than four days, nearly $300 more than his goal. To view Payne’s pitch video, log onto http://huntermadeit.com/lets-draw-underwater.

For more information, call The Studio@620’s box office at 727-895-6620 or log onto their website at studio620.org. The Studio@620’s gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 12-4 p.m. The Studio@620 is located at 620 First Ave. S., St. Petersburg.

FAR OUT: A Black Light Art Exhibit

February 4 – March 4, 2012
Original artwork created by 17 individual artists to be viewed under black lights!

February 4 – March 4, 2012
BLUELUCY Gallery, St. Petersburg, FL

Each artist involved will be creating original art that can be viewed under black light.

Artists in the exhibit: BASK, FRANK STRUNK III, CASEY PAQUET, PALE HORSE, ALLEN LEPER HAMPTON, ADAM T, JOE BOCCIA, SLEEP, SUGAR BEAR, CHAD MIZE, PHILLIP CLARK, JOSH SULLIVAN, NATE GRECO, B.KOLE, SAMUEL SOUTH, ROMAN BLACK, EMBEAR

BLUELUCY GALLERY
653 Central Avenue
St Petersburg FL 33701

CONTACT EMAIL info@bluelucy.net

Salvador Dali Museum – 11.11.11

Friday, November 11, 2011
Special admission promotions and activities to the public throughout the day.

Friday, November 11, 2011
Salvador Dali Museum, St. Petersburg, FL

Special admission promotions and activities to the public throughout the day.
11.11.11. also marks the 10–month anniversary of the new Dalí Museum, which opened on 1.11.11 at 11 am. Activities and special offers continue throughout the day. Admission to visit the Museum’s galleries is free for all veterans, military, firefighters and police with ID; immediate family members enjoy a special rate of $11. Special activities will continue throughout the day until 5:30 pm.

Our Wishes on 11.11.11

Send your wishes for 11.11.11. by mail and by twitter! Tweet your wishes to #DaliWishTree, which will be on view all day at the Museum. We also welcome your wishes by mail:

The Dali Museum
Attn: Andrea Ayala
1 Dali Boulevard
St. Petersburg, FL 33701

1) Send a standard size postcard of 6 in. wide by 4 in. tall.
2) Decorative elements must be limited to 2-dimentional art. Beads, fabric, lace, and other 3-dimensional elements may be damaged or lost in the mail.
3) A valid return address and email address must be included on the postcard.

Four Portfolios of the Twentieth-Century: Archipenko, Gropper, Evans, and Doisneau

July 16-November 13
Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, FL

We bring together two lithographic and two photographic portfolios by four important artists. The portfolios by Alexander Archipenko and Robert Doisneau are European, while those of the photographer Walker Evans and artist William Gropper are decidedly American.

Archipenko’s Sixteen Lithographs, known as the Wasmuth portfolio (1921), is an outstanding early body of work. Commissioned by the noted publisher Ernst Wasmuth of Berlin, the prints were created soon after the modernist sculptor departed from the Paris art world and broke with the Cubists.

Gropper’s portfolio of color lithographs, the Watergate Suite (1973), was given to the Museum in 2010 and is being shown for the first time. Gropper was a social realist whose art came of age during the Great Depression. Here he addresses the congressional hearings on the Watergate scandal, which led to Richard Nixon’s resignation.

Doisneau’s photographs capture Paris and its environs from 1944-1972. They reveal his love for the city, as well as his abundant sense of humor and humanity. Among the 15 images is his famous Kiss of the Hôtel de Ville (1950). Doisneau’s photographs have been instrumental in creating the vision of Paris in the popular imagination.

Evans’s posthumously published portfolio contains some of his earliest photographs, including a rarely-printed image of the Brooklyn Bridge (about 1928). The 14 others include signature photographs of the South, created under the auspices of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) during the 1930s, as well as works from the late stage of his career. These diverse portfolios encourage us to explore the past century through documentary and street photography, modernist experimentation, and political imagery and commentary. They also reflect the vitality of the Museum’s collection of works on paper.