ArtDart: On the Waterfront by Pamela Beck

There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in the second installment of, SeeSaw, to her current column, ARTdart, as she observes and explores various visual art exhibitions and happenings in the Gulf Coast area.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in the second installment of, SeeSaw, to her current column, ARTdart, as she observes and explores various visual art exhibitions and happenings in the Gulf Coast area.

“My most successful relationship has been with water,” a newly single artist recently told me.
I laughed.
“I know that sounds funny, “ he continued, “but we’ve been together forever and it’s the only influence I’ll let dominate me; or at least the only one I’ll admit to,” he added with a devilish smile.
That’s what makes horse races; but seriously, nobody with a beating heart can live in Sarasota and not be affected by the pervasive presence of water.
In the conversations I have with local artists, water is often mentioned as a favorite muse. Whether referenced for its beauty, power, mystery or ever-changing properties, water leaves an indelible mark.
Here’s a sampler of what I SeeSaw around town:

 

Susan Zukowsky
Missing Girl, 2OO3
Mixed media collage: appropriated paper images, rubber ball, wire, glass beads, thread
2O 1/2 x 18 1/2 inches
Jack Dowd’s 27 & Susan Zukowsky
Selby Gallery, Sarasota FL, 34234

Bruce Marsh
Bay Light
Oil on canvas
60 x 65 inches

Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art
1288 N. Palm Ave.
Sarasota, FL 34236

 

 
Irene Gorman
Sarasota Journal
Collage

Florida Flavor
Art Center Sarasota
707 North Tamiami Trail
Sarasota, FL 34236

 

Arnold Desamarais
The Quiet Calm
oil on panel, 2011
18 x 24 inches

Stakenborg Fine Art
1545 Main Street
Sarasota, Fl. 34239
 
Maro Lorimer Old Florida acrylic on gallery wrapped canvas 36 x 24 inches
Maro Lorimer
Old Florida
acrylic on canvas
36 x 24 inches

Art Uptown
1367 Main St
Sarasota, FL 34236
 
 
 

Beatrice del Perugia
Siesta Gold
acrylic on canvas
18″ x 18″, framed 22″ x 22″

Dabbert Gallery
76 S. Palm Ave.
Sarasota, FL 34236

 

 
 
Sigrid Olsen
Marina Magic
mixed media
14 x 17 inches framed

Sigrid Olsen Art
4O7 S. Pineapple Ave.
Sarasota, FL, 34236

 

Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings at Sotheby’s. Perhaps it’s not surprising that she is also a psychotherapist. She has a keen interest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old. Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee and Institute for the Ages Volunteer.

R.O. Woody Interview by Pamela Beck

When you look at an object you don’t just take a split second snapshot image of what you are seeing, you see the subject and everything that surrounds it. There is the changing light, the movement, the relationship to the surrounding elements, the changing color relationships, the atmosphere, even the smell of it all. You have a very complex, encompassing impression of what you are seeing.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.

Mr. Woody received his BA at University of Miami and MFA at Mexico City College. He has been a consultant and technical advisor to Binney and Smith, Inc. (Liquitex), Grumbacher, Inc., and LeFranc and Bourgeois, Inc. He has lectured on materials and color theory at over 450 colleges, universities and art schools throughout the United States, Canada and Europe including the Alberta College of Art, Boston University, University of California/Berkley, Carnegie Institution, Corcoran School of Art, New York University, Ringling School of Art and Design, Yale University, etc.

Mr. Woody has served as Visiting Professor of Art, Illinois State University, Normal, IL and Visiting Professor of Art, St. Cloud State College, St. Cloud, MN. He has authored two books: “Painting With Synthetic Media,” Van Nostrand Reinhold and “Polymer Painting and Related Techniques,” Van Nostrand Reinhold. He is represented by the Dabbert Gallery, Sarasota.

WIMS - TORN COOL TO WARM   110" X 90"   acrylic on torn 5 ply drawing board on free formed wood support
WIMS – TORN COOL TO WARM 110″ X 90″ acrylic on torn 5 ply drawing board on free formed wood support

PB: Your work spans from 1955 to now and changes considerably. What was behind your thinking/ feeling as you changed from your earlier techniques to your current ones?

ROW: I started as a realist — a super realist. At first it was gratifying. But after doing this for a few years, not only did it become technically boring, I realized that people viewing my work were not getting what I wanted them to feel—except on a shallow, superficial level. I was trying to paint more than a face or a tree. I was trying to get to the essence of the subject.

When you look at an object you don’t just take a split second snapshot image of what you are seeing, you see the subject and everything that surrounds it. There is the changing light, the movement, the relationship to the surrounding elements, the changing color relationships, the atmosphere, even the smell of it all. You have a very complex, encompassing impression of what you are seeing.

That’s what I wanted to convey. And the viewers were counting details, counting the leaves, estimating how long it took to complete the painting. So I decided to try and convey the other elements, which led me more and more to abstract the subject. It also led to fewer sales. But at least I had caused the viewer to respond more to the overall concept –even if they did not like it and had to think and contribute something of themselves to the experience. And still today I start quite realistically and then abstract the subject to get the total concept.

WIMS - DANCE PARTNER   88" X 90"  acrylic on torn canvas with faux fur on free formed wood support
WIMS – DANCE PARTNER 88″ X 90″ acrylic on torn canvas with faux fur on free formed wood support

PB: I see you have several paintings that are totally black. Considering most of your work has extensive, saturated color, what are those black ones about? And please talk about your double-sided paintings.

ROW: Initially this started as an exercise. I taught and lectured on color theory. And at one point I realized that when I came upon a problem in a painting I knew I could easily fake my way out of it with color manipulation. So I decided to limit myself to black on black so I could not use color as a crutch.

A short time after I started this, there came many “black” events, outside of, as well as in, my life. There was the shooting of Martin Luther King, John and Robert Kennedy, the Vietnam War and the prolonged dissolution of a twenty-year marriage. I continued this, not as an exercise, but as a valid statement of expression. And I cut holes in the canvas projected sculptural images from the canvas, stuffed and abraded the canvas.

Then a few years later I was worn out, drained, and decided there were two sides to this. At that point I literally made two sides to the painting. I double stretched the canvas, hung if from the ceiling and painted both sides, still cutting holes and stuffing it. I was dealing with the yin/yang concept of opposites, including the concept that within the opposite is a piece of the opposite.

The other side of the black paintings became a strong color statement — with a piece of black in it. Eventually the double-sided paintings became a riot of color and life. But they still contained a bit of the opposite, which, I found, became something different when viewed, or experienced, from the other side. This expressed through design and color interaction –but no less true in philosophical concept.

I was living in New York’s SoHo at that time and Pop Art was what was selling. These large, abstract, conceptual paintings didn’t have a chance. Besides, they took up actual space; hard to ask that in a home.

However I lived in a 3,600 square foot loft at the time, with 14 foot ceilings, and they made great room dividers. I still work on double-sided paintings, but mainly have gone back to wall hanging works. (Although some of the double sided work can be hung on the wall and flipped.) I work in several series concepts: music, especially jazz; dance and the female nude: children on swings and jumping rope, etc.; the Everglades (with both its beauty and uneasy edge), birds.

PB: What were your days in New York like? You lived/worked there during a particularly rich time for artists.

ROW: I loved living in New York! I met many artists such as Bill and Elaine deKooning, James Brooks, Adolph Gottlieb, Milton Resnik, Idelle Weber, Nicholas Krushenick, Robert Motherwell and Helen Frankenthaler. I was able to use most of these artists in my books on materials. They were very gracious and giving people.

I really miss all the museums and galleries and good music and food. And the activity and stimulation. I moved into SoHo at the very beginning of its development as an art center. My loft was formerly a manufacturing loft for tennis wear. They left the cutting tables, which were great drawing and working spaces. There were three galleries, several bars, a great bread company and a restaurant call Food. Later Dean and Deluca moved in just around the corner. But, as I mentioned, I was working against the art wave of the time, which I have seemed to do most of my life.

YELLOW BACKED CROW   24" X 30"   acrylic on canvas
YELLOW BACKED CROW 24″ X 30″ acrylic on canvas

PB: I’ve never seen an artist with so many brushes. Can you tell us about this? Do you use many of them or which in particular?

ROW: You probably have never seen an artist with as much paint as well. When I was studying for my MFA in Mexico I started to paint with automotive lacquer because many of the Mexican muralists, such as Siqueiros, used it as a medium at the time. However, I did not realize how toxic it was. After using lacquer in a small, enclosed studio for the better part of a year (and becoming a very happy artist) I became quite ill and was diagnosed as having leukemia and given about three months to live.

Luckily, a French doctor, who worked with industrial product workers, stepped in and diagnosed me with chemical poisoning. I was treated and recovered, but as a result I did my Master’s thesis on paints — primarily synthetic paints. This later was published as one of the first books on synthetic media. As a result, much to my surprise, I became an expert.

Art supply companies ask me to work with them establishing properties and color positions for the, then, very new acrylics. I was supplied with as much paint as I asked for to do testing and for my own use. (Fantastic, as I was painting large, very heavily impastoed paintings at the time.)

Later on I was also asked to develop brush lines. Especially blends of synthetic and natural hair. All the brushes and paint you saw was the result of years of consultant work and testing of materials.

These companies also hired me to visit colleges and universities and lecture on materials, techniques and color theory. I have lectured at over 450 colleges, art schools and universities all over the United States and Europe.

And yes, I use almost all the brushes depending on the work. I designed brushes for a particular use and each has its place. The same is true of the paints, their working properties and color positions.

PB: You worked with several companies — Liquitex, Grumbacher, LeFranc and Bourgeois — and have great knowledge about materials and color theory. Does your professional knowledge about paint inhibit or help your creative use of it?

ROW: The more you know about materials, techniques and color theory the freer you are to create. You don’t have to stop and think about how to do something; you concentrate on the creativity, not the process.

RED BACKED CROW   24" X 30"   acrylic on canvas
RED BACKED CROW 24″ X 30″ acrylic on canvas

PB: You display your collections of, Inuit art, African art, Pre Colombian Art, Borucan masks and Dominican Republic folk art all over your home. Please describe what draws you to these in particular and if they influence your art. In particular, why are you so drawn to masks?

ROW: We all wear a mask. I am very interested in why. What does it symbolize? What is its purpose? The Inuit works I have are mostly of the raven. I have an affinity with the image as well as the legends surrounding this figure. The raven wears a mask, or rather, has the ability to change into other forms.

I was very influenced by Pre Colombian art in my early work, and still am to a certain extent. I had visual interests in the Aztec masks and especially the Chacmool figure. Others, such as Henry Moore, were similarly influenced. The Chacmool figure has a gory past as an alter figure that holds on its belly a bowl to receive the beating heart cut out of a sacrificial victim, but this figure also is a study in tense visual movement.

In the Mayan culture the sacrifice was an act of rejuvenation, insurance for fertility and continuance of humanity. An artist is always influenced by other artists and concepts, not to imitate, but to understand and expand visually (i.e.: Picasso, etc., and African masks). Henry Moore took the Chacmool figure, a man, and turned it into a woman, in the same contorted position, possibly to emphasize the concept of birth and fertility.

MIDNIGHT LIGHT - MYAKKA   22" X 30"   acrylic on canvas
MIDNIGHT LIGHT – MYAKKA 22″ X 30″ acrylic on canvas

PB: You have lived here twenty years. How does this lifestyle impact your work?

ROW: I visited Florida when I was twelve years old and said: “This is where I will live.” I have always loved the light, the flora and the water here. I received a degree from The University of Miami and worked in South Florida. Then went on to Mexico, New Jersey and New York. My life long friends lived here. So when SoHo became a very expensive zoo, I returned.

Unfortunately I have out lived all my life long friends. The first ten years after my return to Florida I still worked as an artist consultant and traveled almost half of the time. My painting centered on the themes established in New York, with some forays into more water-centered paintings.

When I finally stopped consultant work I centered more on Florida elements. One in particular set me off into a new theme: the Everglades. I took several of the “swamp walks” offered by the photographer Clyde Butcher during Labor Day each year, as well as spending weeks in the Everglades National Park. The “swamp walks” changed my visual perspective as sometimes you wade in water up to your chest. As well as being in close proximity to snakes and alligators and literally being stuck in the mud of the swamp. I wanted to express that point of view.

But it is the light and feeling of Florida that gives me great joy.

PB: What are your painting rituals to get going?

ROW: No set rituals. I go the studio and clean up the place. Or I sit outside the studio and listen to the water in the Koi pond and the wind in the trees. Or I read or listen to music. Or I do random sketches or color studies. But much of the time I look at photographs. I take hundreds and hundreds of photographs. I used to sketch extensively but now I use photos — much of them timed photos and blurred or out of focus (on purpose) photos.

BLUES DANCE   42" X 72"   acrylic on canvas
BLUES DANCE 42″ X 72″ acrylic on canvas

PB: Since music and dance are subjects of yours, what are your favorite types of music and dance?

ROW: Classical Jazz is my first choice, with Classical music a very close second. For contemplation: something like Bill Evans or solo Bach guitar by Segovia or John Williams. For mood: something like Duke Ellington’s “Anatomy of a Murder” or Vivaldi or Phillip Glass. I have music playing all the time I am painting.

I have two very good friends, C.J. and Marilynn Shelley. Both are accomplished drummers and Marilynn is a belly dancer. I have used them as subjects of my work. And I have painted drums for them. I use the dancers at the drum circle as subjects.

And I have used ballet dancers, starting with my children in ballet class as well as professional dancers. I very much like the combination of drums, dance and didgeridoo and try to capture that visually. It’s all as varied as my painting.

PB: What are the changes in the visual arts that you’ve seen over the twenty years you’ve lived here?

ROW: As stated, when I first moved here, I traveled, lecturing at least half of my time. I tried to integrate into the Sarasota art society, but it was not easy. Most galleries had a full “stable” and I was told that most collectors and buyers did not want “local” artists. The collectors went to New York or Palm Beach or galleries that handled these artists.

I finally joined a gallery that succumbed to the recession a year later, as did other galleries at the time. Sarasota was, and is, a center for the arts. But the visual arts were not as supported, in my opinion, twenty years ago. This is amazing, considering the history of Sarasota and all of the very prominent artists that worked and prospered here thirty to forty years ago. The attitude here, as well as in other areas, had changed from open, cooperative and embracing, to one of “self protection”. But maybe this is just a personal reaction as an artist, not an objective observer.

Just like the flow of the arts overall, Sarasota visual arts continue to meld and change. In the past few years the arts scene has changed radically and is much more active and motivated by younger artists and galleries focusing on their work. The Two Columns Gallery, the Willis Smith Galleries and the Crossley Gallery, all at the Ringling School of Art and Design, support and encourage young artists. In the Rosemarie District several galleries exhibit emerging artists. But the most active is the Clothesline Gallery with the creative force of its staff, and especially that of the artist and manager, Van Jazmin. Clothesline was voted Best Gallery of 2013 by Sarasota Magazine. The more traditional galleries also seem more positive and active and in some cases have expanded.

PB: Do you feel like a different person in your home than in your studio?

ROW: Absolutely. The short walk through trees and vine covered arbor past the pond to the studio creates a different mind set. My home is full of other people’s work, collections, as well as my work and my office. The studio, built to the dimensions of the workspace of my SoHo loft, is a place of creativity and reflection–and a place full of materials with which to work.


Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck
Pamela co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings at Sotheby’s. Perhaps it’s not surprising that she is also a psychotherapist. She has a keen interest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old.

Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee; Institute for the Ages, Volunteer

Art: Sarasota Season Style by Pamela Beck

Join Pamela Beck in the first installment of SeeSaw to her current column, ARTdart, as she observes and explores various visual art exhibitions and happenings in the Gulf Coast area.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in the first installment of, SeeSaw, to her current column, ARTdart, as she observes and explores various visual art exhibitions and happenings in the Gulf Coast area.

No, it’s not your imagination. It really does take an extra twenty minutes to get wherever you’re going these days.For art fans, there’s a flip side to not being able to find a parking spot this time of year: More crowds=More exhibitions.

Here, below, are some eyecatchers I’ve seen while gallery hopping on a recent, sunny afternoon. They’re just a small taste of visual treats currently on exhibit in Sarasota.

For a larger picture of shows in town, click “Exhibition” found on the Sarasota Visual Art masthead.

1. Abstract, adj.: Expressing a quality apart from an object, Group Exhibition curated by Kevin Dean, Selby Gallery, Ringling College of Art, till April 3rd

Peter Plagens, Get In There Fast, 2010, mixed media on canvas, 54” x 52”
Peter Plagens, Get In There Fast, 2010, mixed media on canvas, 54” x 52”

The resurgence of Abstract Painting in contemporary art provides this opportunity to explore current trends in relation to the historic movement through the exhibition of eight working painters ranging in age from their thirties’ to their eighties’ who are inspired by nature, music, mathematics, the spiritual and new media.

Selby Gallery, Ringling College of Art and Design,
2700 N. Tamiami Trail
941.359.7563

2. Child’s Play, Group Exhibition curated by Mindy Solomon of the Mindy Solomon Gallery, St. Petersburg, till April 26th

Second-Hand Childhood, by Don Florence Photo, partial view of children's chairs in a circle
Second-Hand Childhood, by Don Florence Photo, partial view of children’s chairs in a circle

Mindy Solomon Gallery
124 2nd Ave NE  St Petersburg, FL 33701
(727) 502.0852

3. iConcept Retrospective, group exhibition curated by Lisa Berger and Eric Cross, Art Center Sarasota, Sarasota, FL, till April 26th

Observer, by Eric Cross, (made from recycled Longboat Key Observer Newspapers). Artists from around Sarasota produce pieces of fashion from avant-garde materials that walk the runway.
Paper Dress, by Eric Cross
Paper Dress, by Eric Cross

Art Center Sarasota
707 N Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, FL 34236
941.365.2032

4. Following Ovid’s Metamorphoses: From Cosmogony to Chaos and back to the Rhizome, curated by Anne-Marie Melster, Two Columns Gallery, Ringling College of Art and Design, till April 14th

Installation View
Installation View

Two Columns Gallery, Ringling College of Art and Desing
1947 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota FL 34236

4. If the Sun was Square, curated by David and Tre Steiner, State of the Arts Gallery, Sarasota, FL, till May 1

Jim Keaton, Machine 4, 26 "x 33" .
Jim Keaton, Machine 4, 26 “x 33”

State of the Arts Gallery
1525 State Street, Sarasota, FL 34236
941.955-2787

5. Ongoing, Nikitas Kavoukles, Stakenborg Fine Art, Sarasota, FL

Sitting by Nikitas Kavoukles, oil on canvas, 26" x 30"
Sitting by Nikitas Kavoukles, oil on canvas, 26″ x 30″

Stakenborg Fine Art
1545 Main Street, Sarasota, FL 34236
941.487.8001

6. Let it Float, Matt Combs, till March 30th, Clothesline Gallery, Sarasota, FL

Matt Coombs, SRSc12 Collage on Paper, 11" x 9.25", 2013
Matt Coombs, SRSc12
Collage on Paper, 11″ x 9.25″, 2013

Clothesline Gallery
529 S. Pineapple Avenue, Sarasota, FL 34236
941.366.5222

Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings at Sotheby’s. Perhaps it’s not surprising that she is also a psychotherapist. She has a keen interest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old.Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee; Sarasota-Manatee Dance Alliance, Advisory Board Committee

Featured Artist: Nancy Turner

Nancy is an artist printmaker who derives inspiration for her work from the people closest to her, from the news media, and from other artists. She uses art as a language to convey information about issues that are important to her.

Nancy is an artist printmaker who derives inspiration for her work from the people closest to her, from the news media, and from other artists. She uses art as a language to convey information about issues that are important to her. Sometimes she rages, but mostly she quietly submits to the viewer conceptual, political narratives about her issues with the hope that the viewer will understand her passion. Her imagery is about the stresses that women experience as a result of societal restrictions of their personal liberty. Her work can be seen at Dabbert Gallery in Sarasota. She is also part of the Creators & Collectors – Suncoast Art Tour

Nancy Turner Portrait

sVA: What pushed you to go forth with a career in art?

I always enjoyed making art, whether it was painting, baker’s clay, stained glass or rubbings. However, I didn’t draw well, didn’t really like drawing and figured that art wasn’t my strength. Besides, making art was fun for me, and learning how to make a living was supposed to be hard work, not fun. In 1990, I took my first printmaking class from Prof. Lloyd Menard at the University of South Dakota. The creative process was stimulating and I worked very hard and made some nice work in his class. He encouraged me to continue in art and when I told him about my lack of skill in drawing, he just stood back and told me that anyone, including me, could be taught to draw! It was like learning math….it just took practice. A whole world opened up for me and I’ve been making art ever since then.

sVA: When someone asked you your senior year of high school what you were going to do with your life, what did you say? How did that differ, or did it differ, from what you did and are doing right now?

I was going to be a drama major! I loved being a part of a production, working together as a team toward one glamorous end. I especially enjoyed painting scenery. But, on stage I was shy. Not a good fit. I changed my major to social work, then to sociology, then….I really didn’t know what I wanted to do with my life. I married and graduated with a degree in Education in1966. I did marvelously well in my educational art classes but was never encouraged to pursue it. By the time I graduated, our first child had been born, family took all of my time and energy and I could postpone dealing with the question of what I wanted to do with my life. As luck would have it, we moved to Vermillion, South Dakota in 1991, where my husband resumed a teaching career at the University of South Dakota. To keep busy, I signed up for some graduate education classes and two art classes. By the end of the second week I had dropped all classes but my printmaking class with Prof. Menard and I’ve stayed with printmaking ever since. After taking a year off to deal with breast cancer, we moved to Charlotte, North Carolina, where I continued taking art classes and volunteered at women’s health care clinics. Recognizing the need for a more rigorous art education, I applied to and was accepted at the Ringling School of Art & Design in Sarasota, Florida, where I worked harder than at any other time in my life. I loved my Ringling experience. I received a BFA with honors in 2001 with a dual major in printmaking and painting. So, in a sense, I recreated myself.

nancy turner
Nancy Turner

sVA: Can you explain your art making process, and how has technology impacted this?

I will often read a story in a newspaper or magazine which will be the genesis for a new print. From that point it’s all about conceptualizing the new idea and getting it down on paper. That’s the challenge. I worry over it, turning it over in my mind for days, sometimes weeks, searching for an image that will say what I want to say. The next decision is to decide which printmaking process or processes at my disposal would best express this new concept; relief, collagraph, etching, or mixed media. There are many printmaking processes and new ones are being developed every day using special papers and inks, special plates and lights and other specialized equipment. There is always something new to learn, and I regularly take classes in printmaking and drawing. I marvel at the new technologies, but I have had to make choices about what will work safely in my studio at home.

sVA: What motivates you to make art right now?

The political process is bringing out the worst in many of our candidates…to these candidates, politics is more important than women’s lives and health. Many candidates are willing to sacrifice not only their principles but also people that they are supposed to represent. Women’s lives are at risk throughout the country because of the controversy over women wanting to make their own family planning decisions without government interference. “Abortion” has been made an ugly word, but there have always been abortions and there will always be abortions, legal or not. To make them safe and legal, to preserve women’s lives, that is what is important. Yes, I am passionate about this subject and it is a strong motivator.

nancy turner
Head, Hands & Feet, Nancy Turner

sVA: Your work comments on the stresses that women experience as a result of societal restrictions. Do you consider yourself a feminist artist?

I dislike labels. I have been called a feminist artist as well as a narrative artist. I consider myself an artist who happens to be interested in women’s issues. Some of my work is politically motivated. However, I have a body of work which is abstract and other work which is about my life and what it means to be a woman in this time and place. I discovered a long time ago that my life’s experiences are not unique to me, that many women have had similar experiences and thoughts. If all of this makes me a feminist artist, so be it.

sVA: In recent years, “feminism” has taken on a wide spectrum of meaning both positive and negative. What does “feminism” mean to you?

To me, “Feminism” means women receiving equal respect, equal treatment, equal opportunity and equal pay to men. It means social equality as well and no “glass ceilings” in the work place. It means that women and girls are not to be bought and sold into marriage like so many bags of potatoes. It means being outraged when women are abused and denigrated. It means women supporting women. Women make up more than half of the world’s population! Imagine the world where all women are encouraged to realize their full potential! Imagine a world with all men and women treating each other as equals……a very different world!

Nancy Turner
Unreasonable Burden, Nancy Turner

sVA: What do you think has been the greatest accomplishment to date with your work?

My series, “Women in Crisis, ” is my greatest accomplishment to date. It is composed of twenty-eight prints in all, based on seven newspaper articles, and is about the lives of seven women and girls in crises situations, all from different cultures. “Women in Crisis” addresses the role of women, the underlying fragile nature of families, and the inherent threat of violence against women throughout the world. I began this work because it was the only language I knew to express my outrage, my horror, and my empathy for these women. It is the goal of my art to make people aware of this violence and to take steps, wherever possible, to end it.


EXPLORE art studios, MEET the artists, SEE the process, Visit the gallery exhibit, And ENJOY the experience. Creators & Collectors – Suncoast Art Tour

Creators & Collectors – Suncoast Art Tour

March 9 and 10, 2012
This unique Tour allows the public into artists’ studios, places you don’t typically see. You actually get to meet and speak with the artists and see firsthand where and how they create their art. It demystifies the artistic process and will provide you with an energized understanding and appreciation of the art on exhibit.

March 9 and 10, 2012
The Fine Art Society of Sarasota (website)

EXPLORE art studios, MEET the artists, SEE the process, Visit the gallery exhibit, And ENJOY the experience

This 2-day Tour is an ambitious show featuring more than 1,000 pieces of art by 17 artists working in Sarasota today. The self-guided Tour will be held on March 9 and 10, 2012, and will sprawl across Sarasota from University Parkway to Clark Road/SR 72. Highlights will include 5 well-known artists in their studios plus a Gallery Exhibit of 12 more artists in the Ringling College of Art + Design Student Center exhibition space.

Andrea-Dasha-Reich - GrayTess (detail)

This unique Tour allows the public into artists’ studios, places you don’t typically see. You actually get to meet and speak with the artists and see firsthand where and how they create their art. It demystifies the artistic process and will provide you with an energized understanding and appreciation of the art on exhibit. Art will be available for sale.

The artists and their studios on the Tour are: International Photographer Giovanni Lunardi, Sarasota Legacy Painter Joseph Melancon, International Multi-Media Painter Andrea Dasha Reich, Ceramic and Metal Sculptor Adam Todd, and Artist Printmaker Nancy Turner.

Nancy Turner - Bird Cage

The companion Gallery Exhibit will feature these artists: Painters Bob Brown, Elena De La Ville, Kris Parins; Collage Artist Sally Sloan; Construction Artist and Painter Jo Prioetti; Fiber Artist Gloria Hall Cropper; Jewelry Designer Renee J. Davis; Plique-à-jour Artist Phil Karp; Glass Artist Liana Martin; Assemblage Artist Barbara F. Page; and Fabric Artist and Designer Linda Tilson.

AND, this year student and alumni artists from Ringling College, through a partnership with RCAD’s madeby Gallery, will also be on display at the Gallery Exhibit. Ringling College is one of four colleges in the country that has an exclusive gallery for its students and alumni. Artists will be doing demonstrations on both days at the Gallery Exhibit.

Joseph-Melancon - A-Walk in the Creekbed

Tickets are $20 advance and $25 at the door and can be purchased on the Society’s website www.FineArtsSarasota.com or at the Van Wezel Box Office, Manatee, Venice & Sarasota Art Centers, Dabbert Gallery, Davidson Drugstores, Galleria Silecchia, State of the Arts Gallery and Artists on the Court.


ABOUT THE FINE ARTS SOCIETY OF SARASOTA
Each year the Society plans and promotes events to support its community outreach grants, scholarship, and education programs. The Society provides cultural and educational opportunities for its members and organizes projects which benefit the entire community and its many visitors. The Society’s art collection is on public display at the Van Wezel Performing Arts Center. The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota is a 501c3 nonprofit, all-volunteer organization. Susan Schober is the Tour Chair and Reva van der Heym is President of the Society.

Adam Todd - Untitled