Art Basel Miami Beach” by Pamela Beck

ArtDart by Pamela Beck: Everybody knows that you can’t see everything when you go to Art Basel Miami Beach. It’s not that you don’t want to, you do. You really do.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.

Everybody knows that you can’t see everything when you go to Art Basel Miami Beach. It’s not that you don’t want to, you do. You really do. But there are more than 20 fairs, more than 75,000 visitors, and your mind stops working after several hours of concentrated art viewing and the constant jostling of well-dressed strangers.

Even if you have the stamina to make it to all of the fairs, there’s the not insignificant problem of finding a taxi to actually get you to them. It’s enough to make you stand on a street corner swearing that you’ll never return to Art Basel again… until you remember that the fabulous Design District will be completed about this time, 2014.

I saw many things that delighted me this year. Like this:

“Seer Bonnet XXI [Eliza] and Seer Bonnett XX [Emily]” Bonnets encrusted with thousands of pearl-headed corsage pins Lisa Sette Gallery
“Seer Bonnet XXI [Eliza] and Seer Bonnett XX [Emily]”
Bonnets encrusted with thousands of pearl-headed corsage pins
Lisa Sette Gallery
This is Angela Ellsworth’s strong statement about traditional Mormonism, her own background. (The points of the pins face inward, while the beautiful pearls reflect another message. Sister wives takes on a whole new meaning…]

And this:

“Tiny Landscape Painting, Antigua: Hurricane Sky, Black Jagged Hill” Oil on Polaroid card 1O x 8 cm Ingleby Gallery
“Tiny Landscape Painting, Antigua:
Hurricane Sky, Black Jagged Hill”
Oil on Polaroid card
1O x 8 cm
Ingleby Gallery

Frank Walter lived in an isolated shack in Antigua for 25 years. He suffered from delusions of aristocratic grandeur but produced these simple, powerful works.

And this:

“Ceyx” Graphite and Ink on paper 5O x 38 inches Dillon Gallery
“Ceyx”
Graphite and Ink on paper
5O x 38 inches
Dillon Gallery

Leah Yerpe’s perfectly rendered figures are riveting as they evoke the beauty and mystery of both human and celestial bodies.

And no trip to Miami will ever again be without a stop at the inspiring Perez Art Museum [PAMM], dramatically set against Biscayne Bay.

Photo:  Perez Art Museum Miami Partial View of Ai Weiwei's "Forever" installation of Chinese bicycles
Photo:
Perez Art Museum Miami
Partial View of Ai Weiwei’s “Forever” installation of Chinese bicycles

Herzog & de Meuron designed this jawdroppingly, elegant structure, both contemporary and organic with its use of concrete, wood and pervasive garden and water features. In a distinct “today’s-museum” style, PAMM compellingly combines art, nature, entertainment, leisure and respect for local culture/climate.

Photo: Perez Art Museum Miami Outside view
Photo: Perez Art Museum Miami
Outside view

The beautiful, sprawling entrance immediately stops you in your tracks with its latticed roof, abundant terraces, and plant infused columns hanging from the roof like tropical stalactites.

Inside, the airy exhibition rooms currently display diverse shows including: “Ai Weiwei: According to What,” the powerful political and personal installations of this outspoken critic of the Chinese government. [Ai was prohibited from traveling to see this exhibition.]

And, in contrast, another exhibit, “A Human Document: Selections from the Sackner Collection of Concrete and Visual Poetry,” is private and quiet, where words and images fuse to create fantastic works that span centuries and styles.

A friend asked me if the museum overpowered the art on exhibit. It’s a fair question. Being inside such a beautifully designed and constructed building is undeniably exciting and uplifting, particularly with the pervasive window views of lush gardens and the bay; not to mention the inviting seating areas, both inside and out, that are already crowd-pleasers.

In the end, my friend’s question will be answered by the art on display. Either it will encourage a visitor’s full involvement or it will be overwhelmed by the particulars of this pleasurable museum experience. Interestingly, this built-in competition is a provocative test for the art itself.

The same challenge can be given to the art presented at the Miami art fairs. The works that engaged me in that supercharged, distracting atmosphere are the ones I’ll remember; and the search for them and what they evoked in me, are the reasons I’ll return.

Now all I need is a car and driver.

Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela is Public relations director for Season of Sculpture and a private art consultant. She co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings at Sotheby’s. She was Communications Director of The Essential Element. Pamela has a keen intrest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old. Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee and Institute for the Ages Volunteer.

    To read more about Pamela, view these links:

Season of Sculpture, Season VII presents “Shared Ground: Eight Artists-Eighteen Installations” by Pamela Beck

This year, Season of Sculpture presents Season VII’s “Shared Ground: Eight Artists, Eighteen Installations.” Eight highly acclaimed artists of regional, national and international renown, will exhibit eighteen large-scale works throughout Sarasota’s beautiful downtown Bayfront Park from November 16, 2013 through May 2014.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.

Many of us have memories of climbing over outdoor sculpture as children; we were free to explore and react to the look, sense and impact of a work of art in its ever-changing natural surroundings. Free from the encumbrances of traditional indoor settings, we experienced art in a fresh and approachable way; sometimes serious, sometimes playful, but always visceral and untethered from rules of art protocol and gallery decorum.

If we were lucky, this was our introduction to sculpture- to be fully engaged, curious and physically interactive without restrictions; and this is exactly the opportunity Season of Sculpture offers to newcomers and established fans alike over the course of the next six months.

Season of Sculpture is a local not for profit, 5O1 [c] 3 organization that produces a biennial, international exhibition of large-scale sculptures along Sarasota’s bay front. It’s free and open to the public 24/7. Their mission is to enrich the cultural and educational experience of residents and visitors. The organization relies on donors, sponsors, volunteers and artists to bring these nationally acclaimed, international invitational exhibitions to Sarasota.

This year, Season of Sculpture presents Season VII’s “Shared Ground: Eight Artists, Eighteen Installations.” Eight highly acclaimed artists of regional, national and international renown, will exhibit eighteen large-scale works throughout Sarasota’s beautiful downtown Bayfront Park from November 16, 2013 through May 2014.

“Shared Ground,” curated by Fayanne Hayes and Andrew Maass, presents sculpture by Heinz Aeschlimann, Hans Van de Bovenkamp, Robert Chambers, Richard Herzog, Linda Howard, Jun Kaneko, Jae-Hyo Lee, and Boaz Vaadia. Docent-led tours will be offered, as well as public and student educational programs.

A satellite exhibition of the artists’ smaller works will be exhibited at the Sarasota Herald-Tribune building at 1741 Main Street in downtown Sarasota from January 7th through May 3Oth, 2014.
As the director of public relations for Season of Sculpture, I’ve had the opportunity to ask the artists about their work. A series of brief interviews with them will appear in this column, starting with Boaz Vaadia.

2OO8 Bronze, boulder & bluestone 86"h. x 12O"w. x 8O" d. A/P, Ed. of 5
Asa, & Yeshoshafat with Dog, 2OO8
Bronze, boulder & bluestone
86″h. x 12O”w. x 8O” d.
A/P, Ed. of 5

 

2O13 Bronze & bluestone 91"h. x 36" w. x 36" d. 2/5, Ed. of 5
David, 2O13
Bronze & bluestone
91″h. x 36″ w. x 36″ d.
2/5, Ed. of 5

Boaz Vaadia Bio:

Vaadia was born in Gat Rimon, Israel in 1951; He was a self-taught artist until he could afford to attend the Avai Institute of Fine Arts, from which he graduated in 1971. He taught himself welding and stone masonry and built his first casting foundry for bronze following his graduation.

In 1975, he was awarded his first, of two, American-Israel Cultural Foundation grants to study in the US, where he has lived and worked ever since, in New York City.

Vaadia’s unique sculptures, either in bronze or stacked bluestone slate, evoke his Israeli heritage in a meditative, contemporary, yet sensual style. His work is permanently sited in numerous public collections, as well as museums and private collections throughout the U.S. including: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Museum; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; the Time Warner Center, NYC; The Ravinia Sculpture Park, Chicago; the Independence Park, Tel Aviv; and The Philharmonic Center for the Arts, Naples, FL.

PB: How long did you think about this sculpture before working on it?
BV: Most of my sculptures take several years of thought and study before I begin carving.

PB: Who/what are some of your influences, artistically or otherwise?
BV: Mainly ancient stonework, but also sculptors like Michelangelo, Noguchi, and Giacometti.

2OO9 Bronze, boulder, & bluestone 76" h. x 12O" w. x 1OO " d. 1/5, Ed. of 5
Family with Dog, 2OO9
Bronze, boulder, & bluestone
76″ h. x 12O” w. x 1OO ” d.
1/5, Ed. of 5

PB: How do you anticipate that your sculpture will look different in the bay front setting?
BV: As my work is layered I believe it will connect well with the environment, looking as though carved by winds from the bay.

PB: What made you choose to do a work of this size?
BV: My work is based on the human scale, allowing viewers to interact with it in a more personal way. The natural materials I work with also help determine the size of my work.

PB: What is your favorite hobby or pastime other than your art?
BV: Meditation and spiritual studies.

2O13 Bronze, basalt & bluestone 65"h. x 9O"w. x 8O" d.
Maaka & Revaham, 2O13
Bronze, basalt & bluestone
65″h. x 9O”w. x 8O” d.

website:
http://sarasotaseasonofsculpture.org/

Contact:
SusanMcleod@michaelsaunders.com

Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela is Public Relations Director for Season of Sculpture and a private art consultant. She co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings, drawings and sculpture at Sotheby’s. She was Communications Director for The Essential Element. Pamela has a keen interest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old. Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee and Institute for the Ages Volunteer.

The Ringling Unveils New Brand Identity by Pamela Beck

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, the State Art Museum of Florida, Florida State University just launched its new brand identity with corresponding graphics and unveiled a secondary name: The Ringling.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, the State Art Museum of Florida, Florida State University just launched its new brand identity with corresponding graphics and unveiled a secondary name: The Ringling. The formal name of the museum will remain the same, although you can see why- The Ringling -is so much more appealing: it’s concise, user-friendly and has a jaunty contemporary punch to it.

Over the last several years, it’s been clear that The Ringling is intent on breaking the dusty stereotype of a museum as simply a passive viewing experience. Programs such as the Art of our Time initiative launched in 2009 with the inaugural Ringling International Arts Festival and series like New Stages: Narrative in Motion have engaged viewers with unique, powerful and unforgettable offerings of the visual and performing arts.

In addition, Ringling By the Bay at Ca’d’ Zan features music and dancing on Art After 5 Thursday evenings; yoga is available on the terrace of Ca’ d’ Zan on the third Saturday of each month; sunsets can be experienced in the James Turrell Skyspace, “Joseph’s Coat”; and the Ringling Underground, “a series of events with live music, art and pop culture in a block-party atmosphere” takes place in the museum’s dreamy courtyard on select nights.

 

2013-04-16_08-55-09_304-1

These options, among many more museum activities not mentioned, illustrate The Ringling’s devotion to serve as an integral and relevant part of the Sarasota community. The launch builds upon this momentum. It reinforces the awareness that the museum is a go-to destination for a variety of cultural, educational and entertainment experiences for all ages.  At the official announcement, Steven High, the museum’s executive director, said that he would like the museum to be known as “visitor friendly and accessible.” He added that he hopes visitors will feel that “this museum is their museum.”

An extensive research process about the museum’s brand identity began in July 2012, with key stakeholders, staff, membership, board members community leaders and patrons of the arts. For outside perspective, the museum also consulted with World Studio, a New York firm specializing in brand design. The new integrated brand platform was then collectively developed.

To assist and clarify The Ringling’s new goals, the six museum venues have each been assigned a descriptive name, color and beautiful, easily identifiable icon that will appear in signage and way-finding, store merchandise, labels, banners, visitor materials, annual reports and other publications. The six venues include: The Ringling Museum of Art; The Ringling Circus Museum; The Ringling Ca’d’ Zan; The Ringling Historic Asolo Theater; The Ringling Education Center and The Ringling Bayfront Gardens.  A new interactive website that encourages visitor participation is slated for the near future.

The “new umbrella identity platform” clarifies the connection between the diverse venues, collections and programs at The Ringling. This consolidation, with its new eye-catching graphic counterpart, signals both a real and perceptual shift for the museum. The Ringling has added to the legacy of John and Mable Ringling by inviting visitors to view themselves as part of the museum’s cultural, creative and innovative present and future development.

 


Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings at Sotheby’s. Perhaps it’s not surprising that she is also a psychotherapist. She has a keen interest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old.Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee; Sarasota-Manatee Dance Alliance, Advisory Board Committee

Art: Sarasota Season Style by Pamela Beck

Join Pamela Beck in the first installment of SeeSaw to her current column, ARTdart, as she observes and explores various visual art exhibitions and happenings in the Gulf Coast area.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in the first installment of, SeeSaw, to her current column, ARTdart, as she observes and explores various visual art exhibitions and happenings in the Gulf Coast area.

No, it’s not your imagination. It really does take an extra twenty minutes to get wherever you’re going these days.For art fans, there’s a flip side to not being able to find a parking spot this time of year: More crowds=More exhibitions.

Here, below, are some eyecatchers I’ve seen while gallery hopping on a recent, sunny afternoon. They’re just a small taste of visual treats currently on exhibit in Sarasota.

For a larger picture of shows in town, click “Exhibition” found on the Sarasota Visual Art masthead.

1. Abstract, adj.: Expressing a quality apart from an object, Group Exhibition curated by Kevin Dean, Selby Gallery, Ringling College of Art, till April 3rd

Peter Plagens, Get In There Fast, 2010, mixed media on canvas, 54” x 52”
Peter Plagens, Get In There Fast, 2010, mixed media on canvas, 54” x 52”

The resurgence of Abstract Painting in contemporary art provides this opportunity to explore current trends in relation to the historic movement through the exhibition of eight working painters ranging in age from their thirties’ to their eighties’ who are inspired by nature, music, mathematics, the spiritual and new media.

Selby Gallery, Ringling College of Art and Design,
2700 N. Tamiami Trail
941.359.7563

2. Child’s Play, Group Exhibition curated by Mindy Solomon of the Mindy Solomon Gallery, St. Petersburg, till April 26th

Second-Hand Childhood, by Don Florence Photo, partial view of children's chairs in a circle
Second-Hand Childhood, by Don Florence Photo, partial view of children’s chairs in a circle

Mindy Solomon Gallery
124 2nd Ave NE  St Petersburg, FL 33701
(727) 502.0852

3. iConcept Retrospective, group exhibition curated by Lisa Berger and Eric Cross, Art Center Sarasota, Sarasota, FL, till April 26th

Observer, by Eric Cross, (made from recycled Longboat Key Observer Newspapers). Artists from around Sarasota produce pieces of fashion from avant-garde materials that walk the runway.
Paper Dress, by Eric Cross
Paper Dress, by Eric Cross

Art Center Sarasota
707 N Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, FL 34236
941.365.2032

4. Following Ovid’s Metamorphoses: From Cosmogony to Chaos and back to the Rhizome, curated by Anne-Marie Melster, Two Columns Gallery, Ringling College of Art and Design, till April 14th

Installation View
Installation View

Two Columns Gallery, Ringling College of Art and Desing
1947 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota FL 34236

4. If the Sun was Square, curated by David and Tre Steiner, State of the Arts Gallery, Sarasota, FL, till May 1

Jim Keaton, Machine 4, 26 "x 33" .
Jim Keaton, Machine 4, 26 “x 33”

State of the Arts Gallery
1525 State Street, Sarasota, FL 34236
941.955-2787

5. Ongoing, Nikitas Kavoukles, Stakenborg Fine Art, Sarasota, FL

Sitting by Nikitas Kavoukles, oil on canvas, 26" x 30"
Sitting by Nikitas Kavoukles, oil on canvas, 26″ x 30″

Stakenborg Fine Art
1545 Main Street, Sarasota, FL 34236
941.487.8001

6. Let it Float, Matt Combs, till March 30th, Clothesline Gallery, Sarasota, FL

Matt Coombs, SRSc12 Collage on Paper, 11" x 9.25", 2013
Matt Coombs, SRSc12
Collage on Paper, 11″ x 9.25″, 2013

Clothesline Gallery
529 S. Pineapple Avenue, Sarasota, FL 34236
941.366.5222

Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings at Sotheby’s. Perhaps it’s not surprising that she is also a psychotherapist. She has a keen interest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old.Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee; Sarasota-Manatee Dance Alliance, Advisory Board Committee

“Art: To Look or Not to Look” by Pamela Beck

Ever since a formerly confident painter friend of mine returned from visiting last month’s Miami art fairs, I’ve noticed a change in our conversations.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her new column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.

Ever since a formerly confident painter friend of mine returned from visiting last month’s Miami art fairs, I’ve noticed a change in our conversations. Now they go something like this:

Artist: “I’m not bold enough to use red like so-and-so does. Did you see his painting in the ABC Gallery booth? Now so-and-so really knows how to work with a strong color like red.

PB: “I don’t know. Your red always looks good to me. Since when did you wonder if you were using red right?”

A: “Since that damn Art Basel. And so many people were using everyday objects in really interesting ways: wires, pencil parts, cut up paper, feathers–Now, every time I look at the new path I’m taking in my work, I keep seeing those images and I become paralyzed. I can’t stay on track anymore–or I want to steal their ideas.”

I began to think about how difficult it is for artists to capture the hint of a new creative direction as it first emerges and before it quickly recedes in their thoughts. Even if the idea manages to stick around and not slip away, the outcome, a blend of the artist’s instinct, work and luck, remains unpredictable until it’s fully realized. The artist’s momentum could be lost anywhere along the way.

Marcel Duchamp, Self-Portrait in Profile, 1958. Torn colored paper on black background. 14.3 x 12.5 cm. Private collection.
Marcel Duchamp, Self-Portrait in Profile, 1958. Torn colored paper on black background. 14.3 x 12.5 cm. Private collection.

If an enormous amount of stimulating art is introduced (i.e. Art Basel) into this delicate process of self-exploration, can it make the artist lose connection to his/her slowly developing thread of personal invention? Can the artist’s original, but not yet fully cooked ideas, get diluted or replaced because of too much exposure to the work of other artists?

I’ve always thought that seeing as much art as possible was a good thing for artists—keeps the eye fresh, feeds the soul, encourages reactions and self-questioning. But my friend’s shutdown or copycat responses, in the face of the Miami art avalanche, gives me pause.

If other “voices” are louder than your own developing one, can you get drowned out? Can you even hear yourself in the chorus?

I think it comes down to a question of personality and timing. Last year, this same friend took to the Miami fairs like paparazzi at the Oscars –but back then, she was firmly and productively entrenched in her work. Her confidence didn’t sway because her direction was already set and established. As a result, she had a great time and enjoyed the work of other artists.

But today, my friend is at a turning point. She’s experimenting with new ideas. Her work is changing and going in an unfamiliar direction. Her curiosity about what she’ll come up with spurs her on, but she’s not yet ready to show her art publicly. She needs to keep working until it feels right and something recognizably her own evolves. In this malleable state, with her work in private transition, it turns out to have been the wrong time for her to go to an Artzilla fair.

The creative process is exhilarating and fragile. It’s hard to come up with an original direction and then stick to it until the results meet with the artist’s satisfaction. While those ideas are developing, each artist must determine what nurtures or destroys this process. It’s a personal decision and, as for my friend, can sometimes seem counterintuitive (an artist avoiding art??)

Conversely, for others, being surrounded by the work of many artists might provide just the perfect clarifying counterpoint, one that helps an artist recognize how to leave the defining thumbprint on his/her work.

Whatever path artists choose to stay connected to their evolving ideas during the creative process, it’s clear that it can be challenging to stay on course. Marcel Duchamp once described his particular approach to this struggle:

“I force myself to contradict myself in order to avoid conforming to my own taste.”


To read more about Pamela, view these links:
http://srxq.blogspot.com/
http://whatdogsreallythink.blogspot.com/