In Process

In Process is an exhibition of new works from artists Dustin Juengel, Noelle McCleaf, Nathan Skiles, Sarah Viviana Valdez, and Tom Winchester.

Friday, January 27, 2017 (6PM -8PM)
3080 N Washington Blvd, #40, Sarasota

Media on view include photo-realistic and abstract painting, color and black-and-white photography, and video installation. Each artwork represents the artist’s individual style, as well as the commonality of an investigative approach.

Facebook Event Link: https://www.facebook.com/events/1391918094182614/

Meet the Artists

Dustin Juengel
Dustin Juengel earned a BFA in Illustration from Ringling College of Art and Design and a MA in Fine Arts from Chelsea College of Art and Design. He is a visiting Faculty member in the FA department at Ringling College and serves as exhibition curator for Art Center Sarasota. His work has been exhibited in the U.S., UK and Germany.

Dustin Juengel
Dustin Juengel

Noelle McCleaf
For In Process, I will be exhibiting new photographs from the Cassadaga Spiritualist Camp in Cassadaga, Florida. I’ve been fascinated by spiritualism and the metaphysical world for most of my life, and I’ve touched on these themes in previous bodies of work. I plan to return to this vibrant community and explore the landscape and its residents as I build upon this new series.

“Spiritualism is the science, philosophy, and religion based upon the principle of continuous life, demonstrated through mediumship”, (Cassadaga Spiritualist Camp, Rev. Mary Rose Gray).

Modern spiritualism began in the 1840s, and still continues today at the Cassadaga Spiritualist Camp in Cassadaga, Florida. Spirit Doors were used during séances so spirits could enter and exit homes easily. Many of them still remain on homes in Cassadaga, but have been closed due to obvious dangers. Spiritualists do not believe in the concept of ghosts, but spirits, who are allowed to come and go, and are not “stuck” as ghosts are often described.

Noelle McCleaf
Noelle McCleaf

Nathan Skiles
Nathan Skiles lives and works in Sarasota, FL and is an instructor at the Ringling College of and Design. Recent exhibitions include: The Clockmaker’s Apprentice, The Hunterdon Art, Clinton, NJ; Black Forest / White Lightning, Sloan Fine Art, New York, NY; Welcome to Tartarus, Welcome to Valhalla, Greene Contemporary, New York, NY

Nathan Skiles
Nathan Skiles

Sarah Viviana Valdez
Valdez’s work is an investigation on play within order, which has been a common occurrence all throughout her undergraduate work up to present. She currently works in a variety of platforms. The medium of curation allows her to assemble exhibitions as a way to often challenge the institution and its predecessors. She uses live performances combining sound and visuals to explore the malleability of environments, both spatially and on the level of human interaction (the audience-performer relationship). Her primary focus as of late has been the use of digital processes in conjunction with microbial substance, under the loose guise of fashion.

Valdez has been working with unconventional materials that biodegrade in order to merge biology with technology. The proliferation of new technological products assimilated into our daily lives has softened our natural senses and is in the process of divorcing humanity from its very ‘human’-ness. Her use of biological and technological materials proposes a needed identity for herself and to our developing counter-culture — to establish a true connection to the natural decaying world by having a symbiotic exchange with the objects we wear as our second skin. Valdez believes that working with multiple tools and platforms creates pathways within each medium and transforms them into useful objectives to aggregate desire, leisure and productivity for the viewer and herself.

Sarah Viviana Valdez
Sarah Viviana Valdez

Tom Winchester
The Black-and-White series is a collection of traditional, black-and-white photographs, created using thirty-five-millimeter film, that are printed in ways which guide viewers’ interpretations toward theories of postmodernism.

This is accomplished by including nuanced cues that expose the physical elements of the medium, in an attempt to create unique objects that allegorically counteract the infinite reproducibility of digital photographs.

By photographing places and objects that illustrate themes of banality, simulation, and fragmentation, then subsequently printing those images in a traditional process that can degrade, stain, or be subject to arbitrary variations outside of my control, the Black-and-White series utilizes photography’s affinity for depiction in order to convey a sense of lost reality.

Tom Winchester
Tom Winchester

3080 N Washington Blvd, #40, Sarasota, FL

SECOND SKIN curated by Sarah Viviana Valdez

POP-UP exhibition featuring works by Irene Garibay, Ava Howard, Ruzica Ivanovic, Celia Garcia Nogales, Sophia Schultz and Sarah Viviana Valdez, curated by Sarah Viviana Valdez.

SECOND SKIN curated by Sarah Viviana Valdez

The work in Second Skin explores tactile interconnectivity. The artists’ ideas have naturally merged by means of interactions with all sorts of materials to define the context of the second skin. These artists have in common an understanding of the body as an entity that expands out its physical contour. Dynamic semiotic materials that form diverse bodies that co-shapes one another. Donna Haraway mentions in When Species Meet that “ … figures have always been where the biological and literary or artistic come together with all of the force of lived reality. My body itself is just such a figure, literally.” She curiously observes the doubleness of our world, where we exist in mundane synergy.

The skin has sensors, consumes experiences, provides a shelter, retains memory, can be subtracted, added or manipulated, changes through time, sheds and regenerates. It interconnects a collection of memories that play an essential role for species when they respond and relate to one another. The final result of this survey is guided through a series of works created with methods that exist outside of the material and transport the spectator and the artist inside the body.

Artists Bio’s:

Irene Garibay (Mexico City, 1991) received her B.A. in Fine Arts from Ringling College of Art and Design in 2016 with a trustee scholarship. She is currently working on a grand sculpture for Ringling Collage’s library through the Nancy Markle sculpture grand.

Sophia Schultz is an Anthropology thesis student receiving her B.A at New College of Florida. Born and raised in Sarasota her art focuses on the body as a home for trauma and healing. She works primarily with installations, photography, and video to engulf the audience into a narrative.

Ružica Ivanović comes from Bosnia and Herzegovina, she is currently a senior in Fine Art in Ringling College of Art and Design, with a main interest in sculpture and installation work.

Ava Z. Howard is an interdisciplinary artist, activist, and organizer in Sarasota, Florida. She is currently working on her B.A at the New College of Florida, as well as organizing with Nothing Arts Collective. Ava studies and is active in the social sciences and art, and allows these intersections to inform her work.

Celia Garcia Nogales (Madrid, Spain) is a student of Fine Arts at Ringling College of Art and Design. She concentrates on printmaking processes and collage.

Sarah Viviana Valdez is a multi-disciplinary artist and independent curator based out of Sarastoa, FL. She received her B.F.A from the Ringling School of Art and Design Fine Art department in 2010.

Artworks:

Celia Garcia Nogales and Ruzica Ivanovic
Dermis
Canvas, wood, projectors and digital video.
(Performance during the opening reception)
In collaboration we have made a video projection piece that speaks about the composition of the skin layers and the hidden events under its superficial tissue.

Ava Z. Howard and Sophia Schultz
‘my home holds me in, and what seeps through’
Canvas, natural dyes, wood, cyanotypes photographs, plants, steel rod, found objects
This piece recognizes the second skin as being one of multiple layers. When descending past the surface it reveals what cannot be seen and what is protected. Remnants of the self, vulnerability, growth, and memory are found within this actualized space.

Irene Garibay
Trozos Alrededor (Slices Around)
Scoby (cultures of bacteria and yeast present during production of kombucha), hemp string and light bulb.
Trozos Alrededor is a sculpture that intends to reveal fragmented materiality. The sculpture is the space, the sculpture is the smelly body in decay, drying out and cracking.

Sarah Viviana Valdez
Biodegradable Gorget : Prototype I
Scoby (cultures of bacteria and yeast present during production of kombucha, mycelium chest plate (root of a mushroom), corn stalk, flour, concrete blocks and hemp rope.
This gorget accessory is part of a series of prototypes that biodegrade and merges biology with design. The materials propose a needed identity for me and to our developing counter culture—to establish a true connection to the natural decaying world.

Intra-Figure
Guache, salt water, cold press rag paper

Solace Death: Critter I
Digital Animation 00:00:30 Loop
This animation and painting is part of a series where each figure goes through a stage in death.


Exhibit runs until November 5th
Gallery Hours: Monday thru Saturday (10 am – 4:00 pm)

Art Center Sarasota
www.artsarasota.org
707 N. Tamiami Tr, Sarasota, FL 34236
941-365-2032

SARTQ at Art Center Sarasota 2016

SARTQ, Art Center Sarasota, Print SARTQ Print Party

January 28 – March 05, 2016
Opening Reception: Thursday, January 28 • 5-8pm

Featuring small-scale, limited-edition prints by the 15 members of this dynamic local artist collective. This is SARTQ’s first all-print exhibition and it reflects their dedication to the medium. The 24” x 30” works are created using traditional and non-traditional print-making methods. Dustin Juengel, the curator of this show and Art Center Sarasota’s exhibitions curator says,

“The prints are unified through their common size and framing instead of turning the focus to the diversity of the SARTQ artists and their different printing styles and methods.”

SARTQ members include Elena De La Ville, Larry Forgard, Zachary Gilliland, Joni Younkins-Herzog, Tim Jaeger, Jeffery Cornwell, Cassia Kite, Andrew Long, Noelle McCleaf, Jenny Medved, Daniel Miller, Laine Nixon, Javier Rodriguez, Steven Strenk, and Natalya Swanson.

SARTQ, Art Center Sarasota, Print
SARTQ Print Exhibit at Art Center Sarasota, 707 N Tamiami Trail, Sarasota FL

7th Annual Print Party!

SARTQ Print Party 2016 / Art Center Sarasota
February 13, 3-7pm

SARTQ Print Party 2016

An annual event that gives the public a chance to interact with both art and artists. This year’s party will serve as an opportunity for the public to purchase a print created right before their eyes while meeting the members of SARTQ, enjoy music and food while viewing the multiple exhibitions of Art Center Sarasota.

From 3-7pm on February 13, SARTQ will hold its free screen-printing party at Art Center Sarasota. SARTQ’s sixth print party in March of 2015 drew nearly 1,500 people who brought shirts, skirts, placemats and everything in between to be screened live by the artists.

“We’re excited to partner with Art Center Sarasota this year for our annual print party,” says SARTQ co-founder, Tim Jaeger. “It’s a natural fit because we can get messy in the classroom and bring people together in the galleries for an entertaining afternoon and evening.”

Once again, each of the 15 artists have created an original design for the event. Attendees may bring their own clothing items such as t-shirts, pants, scarfs etc., though any item that can lie flat under the screen and will accept ink can be printed on. Choose your favorite design — or pick several! — and each print is just $5. The public is encouraged to be creative, with some particularly cute dog clothes, baby tees and handbags resulting from last year’s event. There will also be blank t-shirts on hand for purchase. This is a free, family friendly event.

SARTQ Print Party 2016 / Art Center Sarasota
February 13 • 3-7pm

Incredible Journey: Interview with Emma Thurgood

I’ve been engaged in this ongoing dialogue about support for local contemporary art for quite some time now. Ever since I moved to Sarasota, FL I have experienced a vast amount of creative energy that feels underground, for the most part. Contemporary art collectives and gallery spaces crop up every now and then, which is great because creatives can see Sarasota’s vast potential — the only problem is that they don’t seem to stick for very long. So I wonder; how do we get to a point where new collectives and galleries can become established, and when these new collectives and galleries do become established they, in turn, become a catalyst for new spaces and groups until a domino effect is created? We have a good number of resources, but I think we still need to consider more support from current established institutions, so that artists (young and old) have more of an incentive to stay and help strengthen our art community. For example, when I was recently living in Utah, I loved going to the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art and CUAC because, not only could I view the work of artists living in Los Angeles, Chicago, New York City, Berlin, etc., but I could also view contemporary art that was created by Utah artists! UMOCA even has a “locals only gallery” with a stipend included to help fund each exhibition within that space — AND the work that I saw continually blew my mind because I was viewing powerful, compelling artwork that was created outside of a major art center perspective — it was all new and fresh. I was viewing contemporary art about subjects that were specifically related to the location I was in and that added a whole other dimension to my experience as a viewer. It was also quite clear that these artists were very aware of the contemporary art world, were referencing aspects of it, but not necessarily mimicking it per se — they were adding their own perspective to what I consider an ongoing creative discussion, and it was coming from a Utah perspective. So that makes me think; how amazing would it be to go anywhere in the world and be able to view contemporary art that is representative of that location and its artists’ perspectives, while also being able to view artwork created by emerging and established, national and international, artists in the same space? To me, that would be highly fascinating! Fortunately for Sarasota, I’ve found that Art Center Sarasota is doing just that, and making quite an exciting impression in the process. I recently contacted Art Center Sarasota’s Exhibitions Coordinator, Emma Thurgood, to discuss the Art Center’s 2013-2014 season of exhibitions.

KLL: What is, and has been, your vision for Art Center Sarasota since you started your current position?

ET: My vision for the Art Center’s Exhibitions Program is to grow it to be a leader in Sarasota’s contemporary arts scene. For me, that means showing a variety of art year round that is visually interesting, thought provoking, and creates a memorable experience that they can’t get anywhere else in the area. I’ve been at the Art Center for a year and a half now, and I feel like we are on a great path with those ideas. For the last few exhibitions, visitors have been telling me, “This is the best show I’ve ever been to in Sarasota.” They said that about “Florida Flavor”, they said that about “African Nouveau” and “Leaf | Textile | Purpose” and I think the trend will continue on through the Incredible Journey Season.

KLL: Art Center Sarasota’s 2013-2014 season of exhibitions is titled Incredible Journey; why was that title selected and what should viewers expect to experience during the Incredible Journey season?

ET: Last season was called Southern Exposure for a reason: 20 of the 22 exhibitions we produced were exclusively Florida artists. It was a huge success in highlighting the amazing talents of Florida artists. Now, with Incredible Journey, we’re taking viewers on explorations of different art forms and concepts in art, as well as drawing artists from further afield than we normally do. In the past, it was very rare that our curated shows included artists that were outside of the Florida region. This season, we are presenting artists from across America and we have started the eight-year international exhibition program, “Confluence.” This program is an initiative I started where we will be showcasing artists from the countries in which Sarasota has a sister city. This year it’s Israel, 2015 is Russia.

I think this season is going to take some viewers’ way outside of their comfort zone. There are a lot of shows on the docket that present works that many people aren’t accustomed to seeing in Sarasota. For me, this is all part of creating a dialogue about what art is and can mean that will break down some barriers that have been put up.

KLL: We’ve talked a lot about fostering more support for local artists and creating an incentive for recent graduates to continue to live and work as artists in Sarasota; how is Art Center Sarasota contributing to this goal?

ET: Our main contribution towards encouraging students to stay in Sarasota is through Black Box Projects. It is specifically for students and recent graduates to produce an ambitious project. The Art Center provides an exhibition space and time, as well as some financial resources to see the vision of a student come to life. This contributes to their understanding of real world skills because they have to write a professional proposal to be considered and they have to produce the show.  Because we schedule so far out in advance, a candidate could be a student when they apply for the Project, but already graduated when the Project finally comes on display in the gallery. Secondly, we have juried shows year round, and students and young artists who have been submitting have been winning awards and selling their work regularly over the past six months. Sarasota in general is a great place for that kind of success, too. In my research of other centers like Art Center Sarasota across the country, very few regions are like ours in that they offer so many exhibition opportunities year round across multiple venues. The rate for being selected to hang in a juried exhibit is very high, as well. In other shows across the country, you are competing with hundreds, sometimes thousands of people and only a small handful will be selected. In the Art Center’s juried shows, we receive around 300 submissions from about 200 artists and hang approximately 140-160 pieces. In the current juried show, “miniatures,” we have 244 pieces on display from a submission pool of 345. Those are some great odds for artists.

KLL: In your opinion, why should there be support for local contemporary art in Sarasota?

ET: A city is only as old as its youngest member. If the art scene continues to alienate the younger artists and audiences as it has in years past, they’ll find somewhere else to go where they feel like they belong. It’s a difficult challenge to deal with, especially as a non-profit, because the young people are not always the financial supporters of an organization. But organizations need to cultivate the next round of supporters because, as with all things, times and people change.

Art Center Sarasota does a pretty good job walking this tightrope, I think. I try to make sure that there is something on display for everyone. I have at any given time over 300 artworks on display in the building and they’re all different.  No person should be leaving the center saying that there was not a single piece they liked. It’s impossible.

KLL: What advice would you give to recent graduates about establishing an art practice/career in Sarasota and/or its neighboring communities?

ET: Get involved! It’s hard for students, between classes and jobs, but seriously, there’s still enough down time in their life for them to carve out even twenty minutes a week to go and look at what’s on display in a gallery. The more involved they can become in the arts scene, the better off they’ll be. They’ll have a better idea of who the players are, they’ll be able to meet and speak with many of them at receptions, and it will give them a better idea of how they fit into the art landscape. One of the things I can’t stand is when a  young artist comes to me to ask me to put on a show of their work and they have no idea who I am or what I do or even anything about my organization. I teach a professional practices class at the center with Elizabeth Hillmann, our Education Coordinator, and one of the things we talk about is gallery etiquette. I live by a simple rule when it comes to that: date your gallery. Be informed about who they are and what they do before you approach them, be respectful of their time, and if they pick you for representation, treat them with the absolute utmost respect and maintain a good relationship.

KLL: What other services does the center provide that the community can get involved with?

ET: Art Center Sarasota has a wide variety of events and public programs throughout the year. I have a great lecture season coming up with Kevin Costello and Baila Miller starting on November 21. We also have a killer education program with tons of classes in painting, sculpture, collage, jewelry and other fun stuff. The full listing of classes and workshops can be found at www.artsarasota.org/education. I’m really looking forward to Paper Arts Week November 18 – 22. Then, in March we have tons of programming to accompany our “Confluence: Israel” exhibit and of course, iconcept on March 28, 2014 where art walks the runway!

KLL: I am thrilled by the variety of art mediums and artists that are, and will be, exhibiting this season. Can you touch upon the importance of a diverse exhibition space that incorporates the work of local, national, and international artists?

ET: The best thing about the space at the Art Center is that we have four different galleries. So I generally show four different shows at any one time. Our largest gallery is always a juried exhibit of predominantly local artists. Some of them come from further afield in Florida, and every now and then we get someone from out of state. The other three galleries are dedicated to curated shows of local artists, community groups and nationally recognized artists.

I think some artists would prefer if we only showed local artists all the time, but as a community center, we are not just here for the local artists, we’re here for the viewers too. That’s a difficult balance to manage sometimes. Showing the work of local artists is great, and I do it as often as I can, but showing that work doesn’t mean anything if no one is coming to look at it. What makes a viewer come to look at the local art that we are displaying as opposed to any of the other venues in town doing the same thing? That’s what our curated show of more recognized artists are for- they get the people in the door to come and see something they can’t anywhere else in town. I couldn’t tell you how many times someone has come in to see one of our shows in the front gallery and then bought something from a local artist out of the juried show. It’s also a benefit for the artists showing that they can say they’ve exhibited at a place that has also exhibited such notables as John Chamberlain, Syd Solomon and many others.  It offers up some shared prestige.

KLL: Can you tell us a little bit about CUBEMUSIC, Sun Boxes, and Pulp Culture?

ET: CUBEMUSIC and Sun Boxes, from Craig Colorusso, are the big blockbusters for the opening of our season. I feel like they really kick off the journey. Sound art is so underrepresented in Sarasota. The only other exhibit I’m aware of is the one at the Ringling in late 2011. But, for that you had to pay to go see it or wait for free Monday, and generally the people that need free Monday have to work on Mondays. What’s a viewer to do? Art Center Sarasota is always free and open to the public during our business hours, Mon-Sat 10a-4p. CUBEMUSIC will be transforming the space of Gallery 1 for the next eight weeks. Its cast light and shadows coupled with the soothing deep resonance of sound creates a truly altering experience of the space.

For viewers who still aren’t able to come and see the art, the art is coming to you! We are so excited to take Craig’s other installation Sun Boxes on the road around Sarasota. We’re stopping at parks and beaches to bring sound art to the masses. Whereas CUBEMUSIC is somewhat dark and ominous in its sound, Sun Boxes is positively ethereal. You can’t help but feel happy when you see them and hear them. The full schedule of the Sun Boxes tour for November and January can be found at www.artsarasota.org/sunboxes.

Pulp Culture is another show opening November 7 that I curated. I wanted to do a fun show about paper because I have such a love for it. I daresay it’s a dangerous addiction. I tried to not be too serious about it and just show fun creative art that would make people smile while educating them about the way that paper can be used for art other than drawing or painting. So far it seems I’ve accomplished my goal because of the feedback I’ve already gotten while I was installing the show.

art center sarasota image

You can view more information about Art Center Sarasota, Sun Boxes, CUBEMUSIC, Pulp Culture, and Emma Thurgood at:

Art Center Sarasota

Backstage Pass: Emma Thurgood curates excitement

Artist Interview: Craig Colorusso

 

ArtDart: On the Waterfront by Pamela Beck

There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in the second installment of, SeeSaw, to her current column, ARTdart, as she observes and explores various visual art exhibitions and happenings in the Gulf Coast area.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in the second installment of, SeeSaw, to her current column, ARTdart, as she observes and explores various visual art exhibitions and happenings in the Gulf Coast area.

“My most successful relationship has been with water,” a newly single artist recently told me.
I laughed.
“I know that sounds funny, “ he continued, “but we’ve been together forever and it’s the only influence I’ll let dominate me; or at least the only one I’ll admit to,” he added with a devilish smile.
That’s what makes horse races; but seriously, nobody with a beating heart can live in Sarasota and not be affected by the pervasive presence of water.
In the conversations I have with local artists, water is often mentioned as a favorite muse. Whether referenced for its beauty, power, mystery or ever-changing properties, water leaves an indelible mark.
Here’s a sampler of what I SeeSaw around town:

 

Susan Zukowsky
Missing Girl, 2OO3
Mixed media collage: appropriated paper images, rubber ball, wire, glass beads, thread
2O 1/2 x 18 1/2 inches
Jack Dowd’s 27 & Susan Zukowsky
Selby Gallery, Sarasota FL, 34234

Bruce Marsh
Bay Light
Oil on canvas
60 x 65 inches

Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art
1288 N. Palm Ave.
Sarasota, FL 34236

 

 
Irene Gorman
Sarasota Journal
Collage

Florida Flavor
Art Center Sarasota
707 North Tamiami Trail
Sarasota, FL 34236

 

Arnold Desamarais
The Quiet Calm
oil on panel, 2011
18 x 24 inches

Stakenborg Fine Art
1545 Main Street
Sarasota, Fl. 34239
 
Maro Lorimer Old Florida acrylic on gallery wrapped canvas 36 x 24 inches
Maro Lorimer
Old Florida
acrylic on canvas
36 x 24 inches

Art Uptown
1367 Main St
Sarasota, FL 34236
 
 
 

Beatrice del Perugia
Siesta Gold
acrylic on canvas
18″ x 18″, framed 22″ x 22″

Dabbert Gallery
76 S. Palm Ave.
Sarasota, FL 34236

 

 
 
Sigrid Olsen
Marina Magic
mixed media
14 x 17 inches framed

Sigrid Olsen Art
4O7 S. Pineapple Ave.
Sarasota, FL, 34236

 

Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings at Sotheby’s. Perhaps it’s not surprising that she is also a psychotherapist. She has a keen interest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old. Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee and Institute for the Ages Volunteer.