The Andy Warhol Legacy Project & The Importance of Being Photographed at USF CAM

The Contemporary Art Museum Institute for Research Art in Tampa will be exhibiting two separate shows which include Andy Warhol, Tina Barney, Dawoud Bey, Katy Grannan, Jason Lazarus,Malerie Marder, Ryan McGinley, Catherine Opie, and Alec Soth

August 20 – December 15, 2012
USF Contemporary Art Museum

Genevieve Lykes Dimmitt Lobby Gallery and West Gallery

The Andy Warhol Legacy Project

The Andy Warhol Legacy Project is an exhibition of Polaroids and silver gelatin prints the USF Contemporary Art Museum received in 2008 as a gift from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts as part of the Andy Warhol Photographic Legacy Program. This important gift of 106 original Polaroid photographs and 50 gelatin silver prints consists of work produced by Warhol between 1970 and 1987. The portraits, celebrity snapshots, couples, nudes, painting ideas, party photos, still lifes, and outdoor scenes that make up the gift demonstrate the range of Warhol’s interests. The Polaroid portraits reveal the artist’s frank engagement with his subjects. The gelatin silver photographs demonstrate his compositional skill, his eye for detail, and his compulsive desire to document the time in which he lived. The collection at USFCAM consists primarily of works on paper, and this generous gift of work by one of the more significant artists of the 20th century acknowledges and advances the strengths of the collection.

Andy Warhol, Unidentified Woman #23 (Blonde Hair and Dog), 1986. Collection University of South Florida

Lee & Victor Leavengood Gallery

The Importance of Being Photographed

Anticipating the gaze of the camera is the subject of The Importance of Being Photographed. Taking its cue from a gift from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, this exhibition features a select grouping of contemporary photographers who create situations where the subject and the photographer engage in a dialogue about the nature of being photographed addressing issues of class, sexuality, sensuality, shame, despair, and privacy. The title of the exhibition is taken from Oscar Wilde’s funny and biting comedy, The Importance of Being Earnest, in which Wilde mixes mistaken identity with a polemic on economic stratification at the end of the of nineteenth century. The play and its famous title serve as a reference and backdrop for this exhibition that explores voyeurism, stratification, and celebrity in our contemporary times. Artists include:Tina Barney, Dawoud Bey, Katy Grannan, Jason Lazarus,Malerie Marder, Ryan McGinley, Catherine Opie, and Alec Soth. The Importance of Being Photographed is curated by Jane Simon, USFCAM Curator, and organized by the USF Contemporary Art Museum, Tampa.

Catherine Opie, Leon, 2008. Courtesy of the artist and Mitchell-­‐Innes & Nash, New
York

Mon-­‐Fri 10am-­‐5pm, Sat 1-­‐4pm.
Closed Sunday and University holidays.


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The Goods: Weekend News (06.01.12)

Sarasota Visual Art’s round up of information, upcoming exhibitions, and events. Vintage Photographs, Brassaï, Andy Warhol, Florida Museum of Photographic Arts, art collectors.

Olda Reviews: Andy Warhol and (Facebook) Friends

The Florida Museum of Photographic Arts highlights Andy Warhol’s photography in its outgoing exhibit, Andy Warhol and Friends. The exhibition features the photographic work of Andy Warhol, combining his photo booth images, Polaroids, and his series […]

Start the Conversation by Pamela Beck

Recently I was at a Sarasota party where a group of older art collectors discussed several art events of this past season. Talk included “Beyond Bling,” the Ringling Museum’s show of hip-hop inspired art; street artist MTO’s “Fast Life,” […]

The Secret Paris of the 1930s: Vintage Photographs by Brassaï

Venture into a world of dark shadows and romantic interludes through the lens of Brassaï. This sensual body of work includes five rare “Transmutation” photographs made with the cliché-verre technique …

Olda Reviews: Andy Warhol and (Facebook) Friends

The Florida Museum of Photographic Arts highlights Andy Warhol’s photography in its outgoing exhibit, Andy Warhol and Friends. The exhibition features the photographic work of Andy Warhol, combining his photo booth images, Polaroids, and his series of self portraits among other work. The collection includes portraits of celebrities such as Liza Minnelli, Mick Jagger, and Sylvester Stallone.

by Danny Olda

Dial-up internet had just sprouted legs and began to crawl out of the water when Andy Warhol died. Yet, somehow, he pegged the Facebook aesthetic while Mark Zuckerberg was still learning how to speak in complete sentences. Saying “Warhol was ahead of his time” isn’t so much a cliché compliment as pointing out some sort of cosmic mistake.

The Florida Museum of Photographic Arts highlights Andy Warhol’s photography in its outgoing exhibit, Andy Warhol and Friends. The exhibition features the photographic work of Andy Warhol, combining his photo booth images, Polaroids, and his series of self portraits among other work. The collection includes portraits of celebrities such as Liza Minnelli, Mick Jagger, and Sylvester Stallone.

Danny Olda Cube
Cube at Rivergate, 2012 © Chip Weiner

Though Warhol’s screen prints may be more highly sought after, I’d argue that his photographs are often more relevant. Warhol’s small self portraits for example, clearly anticipate Social Networking avatars. Not directly, but it is fascinating in the quarter of a century that has passed, the aesthetics of this type of self-representation has changed little. It isn’t difficult to imagine Warhol taking these exact self portraits with Instagram and uploading it to his Twitter profile. The reason these self-portraits were so engrossing involves more than aesthetics. The idea isn’t quite that of preferring image over content. Rather, Warhol’s photographs point to our photo saturated world where the image is the content. Consider what Warhol would do with the likes of Tumblr, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Andy Warhol and Friends not only reminded me of avatars but also of news feeds, our constant documentation of everyday life. One brilliant photograph held me longer than the others: a photo of Mick Jagger eating. Warhol snapped the photo while Jagger had food on his fork and was bringing it to his mouth. His eyes concentrate intently on the incoming bite. Jagger’s face resembles that of an infant’s opening wide for a pacifier. The attention keeps being drawn to his mouth and to see it open in perpetual anticipation makes the scene nearly sexual. Something I found funny is how I unintentionally imagined the scene playing out: Warhol snapping the photo, not with his eye plugged to a view finder, but holding an iPhone out in front of him.

It’s easy to get lost in a ‘what if’ train of thought. The FMoPA’s exhibit makes it even easier to get lost in the world of Andy Warhol, where Dolly Parton is a friend and Sting will pose for a picture. I would’ve been tweeting the whole thing.

Congratulations to the FMoPA on a successful inaugural exhibition in their new home in the Cube at Rivergate.


Danny Olda is our Tampa Correspondent and publisher of
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The Goods: Weekend News (03.09.12)

Sarasota Visual Art’s round up of information, upcoming exhibitions, and events. Morean Arts Center, Gale Fulton Ross, Andy Warhol and Friends, 10×10, Art Center Sarasota, Iconography

Olda Reviews: I LIKE MY ART LIKE MY VEGGIES…
Art hasn’t always been (and presumably won’t always be) bought and sold the way it is today. St. Petersburg’s Morean Arts Center is putting another option on the table. Introducing the farm box of art[…]
Featured Artist: Gale Fulton Ross
Currently, my work is abstract. However, I am still in love with the face and figure. I speak in two art languages. My figures are stronger because I have been doing them a lot longer and I am known for emotional expression.
Gale Fulton Ross
Mouth of the Basin
ANDY WARHOL & FRIENDS
March 10 – An exhibit of vividly hued screen prints as well as photographs and photo booth strips from 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. They feature portraits of such celebrities as John Wayne, Liza Minnelli, Sting, Mick Jagger, Jack Nicholson, Sylvester Stallone, Grace Jones and Dennis Hopper. Also included are Warhol’s famous self-portraits.
Andy Warhol
Liza Minnelli, 1977 © 2012 The Any Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
10×10: ten images by ten presenters
Upcoming – Showcasing and introducing a diverse group of leaders from the local creative community. Each speaker will present 10 images. Ann Albritton, Carl Abbott, Dasha Reich, Jeannie Perales, Kevin Dean, Maribeth Clark, Matthew McLendon, Matt Walsh, Rick Rados, Uzi Baram

10x10

Artists Who Made Sarasota Famous & The Story of the Sarasota Art Association
Closing – Recognizing over 40 artists who established Art Center Sarasota as a dynamic and vital community art center, and chronicling the Art Association’s formative years through photography and unique memorabilia.
ICON: The Work Of Three Artists Re-Examines Iconography
Closing – An exhibit presenting Robert Lovejoy, Vadim Bolshakov, and Gwendolyn Fryer at the Art Center Sarasota.

The Talent Show

September 30 – December 10, 2011
This exhibit explores the competing desires of notoriety and privacy, and the evolving relationship between artists and audiences in our culture of reality television and Web-based social media.

September 30 – December 10, 2011
Contemporary Art Museum, USF Tampa Campus

The Talent Show explores the competing desires of notoriety and privacy, and the evolving relationship between artists and audiences in our culture of reality television and Web-based social media. For almost half a century, artists have modeled and exploited these desires and dramatized the complex dynamics that surround them, often engaging people to participate in their work—both with and without their knowledge.

Stanley Brouwn
Chris Burden
Sophie Calle
Peter Campus
Graciela Carnevale
Phil Collins
Philip-Lorca diCorcia
Tehching Hsieh
David Lamelas
Piero Manzoni
Adrian Piper
Amie Siegel
John Smith
Andy Warhol
Gillian Wearing
Hannah Wilke
Shizuka Yokomizo
Carey Young

The Talent Show is organized by Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, and is made possible by generous support from the David Teiger Foundation and Ann M. Hatch. The exhibition is curated by Peter Eleey.