ArtDart: On the Waterfront by Pamela Beck

There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in the second installment of, SeeSaw, to her current column, ARTdart, as she observes and explores various visual art exhibitions and happenings in the Gulf Coast area.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in the second installment of, SeeSaw, to her current column, ARTdart, as she observes and explores various visual art exhibitions and happenings in the Gulf Coast area.

“My most successful relationship has been with water,” a newly single artist recently told me.
I laughed.
“I know that sounds funny, “ he continued, “but we’ve been together forever and it’s the only influence I’ll let dominate me; or at least the only one I’ll admit to,” he added with a devilish smile.
That’s what makes horse races; but seriously, nobody with a beating heart can live in Sarasota and not be affected by the pervasive presence of water.
In the conversations I have with local artists, water is often mentioned as a favorite muse. Whether referenced for its beauty, power, mystery or ever-changing properties, water leaves an indelible mark.
Here’s a sampler of what I SeeSaw around town:

 

Susan Zukowsky
Missing Girl, 2OO3
Mixed media collage: appropriated paper images, rubber ball, wire, glass beads, thread
2O 1/2 x 18 1/2 inches
Jack Dowd’s 27 & Susan Zukowsky
Selby Gallery, Sarasota FL, 34234

Bruce Marsh
Bay Light
Oil on canvas
60 x 65 inches

Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art
1288 N. Palm Ave.
Sarasota, FL 34236

 

 
Irene Gorman
Sarasota Journal
Collage

Florida Flavor
Art Center Sarasota
707 North Tamiami Trail
Sarasota, FL 34236

 

Arnold Desamarais
The Quiet Calm
oil on panel, 2011
18 x 24 inches

Stakenborg Fine Art
1545 Main Street
Sarasota, Fl. 34239
 
Maro Lorimer Old Florida acrylic on gallery wrapped canvas 36 x 24 inches
Maro Lorimer
Old Florida
acrylic on canvas
36 x 24 inches

Art Uptown
1367 Main St
Sarasota, FL 34236
 
 
 

Beatrice del Perugia
Siesta Gold
acrylic on canvas
18″ x 18″, framed 22″ x 22″

Dabbert Gallery
76 S. Palm Ave.
Sarasota, FL 34236

 

 
 
Sigrid Olsen
Marina Magic
mixed media
14 x 17 inches framed

Sigrid Olsen Art
4O7 S. Pineapple Ave.
Sarasota, FL, 34236

 

Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings at Sotheby’s. Perhaps it’s not surprising that she is also a psychotherapist. She has a keen interest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old. Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee and Institute for the Ages Volunteer.

Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art Presents “Some Wonderful Abstractions”

August 15 – October 5, 2013
Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art

A group show featuring paintings and works on paper by gallery artists, a survey of paintings by Bianca Pratorius and sculpture by Mary-Ann Prack

August 15 – October 5, 2013
Some Wonderful Abstractions
Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art
Sarasota, FL

Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art gallery presents “Some Wonderful Abstractions,” August 15-October 5, 2013, featuring paintings and works on paper by Luisa Basnuevo, Michael Kessler, Juri Morioka, Gustavo Ramos Rivera, Yolanda Sanchez, Richard Schemm, Mike Solomon and Valerie Stuart. The exhibit also features a survey of paintings by Bianca Pratorius with selections from three bodies of work created over 15 years and sculpture by Mary-Ann Prack.

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Street view, Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art

Luisa Basnuevo ( Miami ) was born in Cuba and came to the United States via Spain. She received a B.F.A from Florida International University and a M.F.A. from Yale University School of Art in 1991. Her paintings have been exhibited in museums and galleries in the United States and abroad, including the Southeastern Center of Contemporary Art in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and the Musée de Luxembourg in Paris. Her work is included in public and corporate collections throughout Florida, including those of the Miami Art Museum, the Ringling Museum, and the Polk Museum of Art in Lakeland. She is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endownment for the Arts/Southeastern Arts Federation, the South Florida Consortium, and the Division of Cultural Affairs, Florida Department of State.

Michael Kessler ( Santa Fe ) makes nature-based paintings that merge geometric elements with biomorphism. Influenced by the paintings of Brice Marden and Elizabeth Murray, as well as by the music of Phillip Glass and Steve Reich, his works are characterized by large fields of diaphanous color that are activated by organic linear structures that have been visually and physically woven into a grid structure which consists of thick slabs of paint. Kessler’s work is shown and collected around the country.

Juri Morioka ( New York )was born in Tokyo and came to the United States as a high school exchange student. She earned a BFA in painting at Parsons School of Design in 1990 and has been working in Manhattan ever since. About her work, she says, “I always approach the canvas directly, without any preceding sketches or studies. I paint in the manner of Zen, moving my brushes along with my mind’s rhythm, relying solely on instinct and intuition. Outside of conscious thought, I search for harmony and form in the play of color and shapes, and a composition gradually emerges. Then, feeling my way with my brush, I enter the painting and wander through its spaces and along its paths with a deep sense of belonging. I welcome the viewer to join me on the same journey, with the same sense of belonging, sharing in the belief that everything has a life of its own.”

Gustavo Ramos Rivera ( San Fransisco ) is an abstract painter whose work is celebrated for its intense emotional content and its unique, personal symbology. Rivera’s paintings combine the palette and iconography of the indigenous cultural heritage of his native Mexico with classic techniques of post war American abstraction. In his paintings, Rivera constructs layers of intense translucent color fields upon which he lays simple hieroglyphic markings of rich impasto which seem at once archaic and contemporary. They articulate a poetic narrative but also express the artist’s pure delight in working the medium of oil paint. In addition to his painting Rivera is also a master printmaker who works in monotypes, intaglio and lithography. He has also produced unique and limited edition artist books illustrated with original art. Rivera is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships and in 2006 the San Jose Museum of Art presented a retrospective exhibition of the artist’s work that traveled to additional venues in Mexico and California.

Yolanda Sánchez ( Miami ) was born in Havana, Cuba, and emigrated to the United States in 1960. She obtained a Ph.D. in clinical psychology in 1979, and has practiced and taught psychology at the graduate level for over 30 years. Prompted by a personal crisis in her mid-30s, Sánchez decided to give voice to her creativity and returned to school, obtaining a BFA and, subsequently, an MFA from Yale University in painting. She is a Fulbright scholar, completing her fellowship as a painter in Spain. Sánchez conducts “research” in the natural landscape—largely influenced by color, texture and light—and paints in her studio. Her work is never a direct translation of what she sees, but rather is an expression of a felt experience, a memory of or desire for the experience. The paintings are also informed by a variety of sources, including the physical world, literature, and particularly, poetry, dance, calligraphy and Asian art. She works with oils on both paper and canvas.

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Yolanda Sanchez, Something in the Air, 2012 oil on canvas, 70″ x 60″

A native of Michigan who studied at Cranbrook, Richard Schemm ( Traverse City Mi ) lives today in a log home outside Traverse City. An early interest in cabinetmaking developed his interest in beautiful wood finishes and eventually in making beautiful paintings. His work has been praised for its attention to detail and keen use of color. Schemm has exhibited widely over the past 30 years including at New York’s Allan Stone Gallery.

Mike Solomon ( East Hampton ) makes sculpture and paintings that combine the conceptual with the abstract. In an essay about his work, art critic Helen Harrison wrote, “His art embodies fundamental qualities that he perceives in nature, for which he creates aesthetic analogies. Without imitating those qualities he captures their essence, pins it down and offers it as a gift to those who take the time to receive it.”

Michael Solomon, Memoria de Seville, 2012, watercolor on papers infused with epoxy, mounted on panel, 36" x 36"
Mike Solomon, A Frank O’Hara Summer, 2012, watercolor on papers infused with epoxy, mounted on panel, 24″ x 24″

Through the use of color, brush strokes and fresco applications Valerie Stuart ( Sun Valley ) creates haunting atmospheric imagery from natural sources such as landscapes, seascapes, skyscapes, flowers and plants. She plays with color and form to create a dream-like experience that invites the viewers to bring their personal interpretations into the piece. Stuart’s work attempts to create a relationship or shared experience between the viewer and her work by developing color field landscapes that evoke memories or fantasies.

Bianca Pratorius ( Miami ) was born in Cologne, Germany, in 1969. She completed a three-year program at the Holzfachschule Koeln focusing on furniture building and design. She subsequently moved to Miami and now lives and works in the Miami area. Her work is featured internationally in many private and corporate collections, including the Neiman Marcus Collection ( in a number of store locations ) and the Millenium Partners Collection permanently displayed in the Four Seasons Hotel in Miami. “The unifying thread through my work has been pattern and repetition, which I explore through simple yet labor-intensive processes,” she says. “The patterns reprensent the perfect analogy for the chaos that surrounds us and the complexities within us.”

Bianca Pratorius, What Makes You Think You Can Say That
Bianca Pratorius, What Makes You Think You Can Say That

During the 1980’s, Mary-Ann Prack ( Jefferson NC ) concentrated on developing hand-built ceramics as a sculpture medium; exhibiting her work in a broad range of indoor and outdoor venues. Though she uses ceramics as a material she does not follow the potters vessel concept but blazes her own path with clay as a pure sculpture medium; hand-building each piece using stoneware clay slabs; carved line work/textures; and glazes, colors, or stains with a painters approach to surface treatments. In 1994, she and her husband moved their studio to North Carolina, to take advantage of an environment that “amplifies the creative spirit.” Prack continues to exhibit her work in commercial and institutional galleries within the United States and Canada. She has fully matured her artistic style into an instantly recognizable abstract expressionist form that continues to gather awards and commendations from critics everywhere.

Mary Ann Prack, Anu

About Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art

Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art was established in 1991. Since the beginning, its founder, Allyn Gallup, has been committed to providing serious art to the community. Through this commitment, the gallery has earned the reputation as the leading place in southwest Florida to view contemporary art. The gallery’s collection includes paintings, sculptures, mixed-media assemblages, works on paper and prints by mid-career artists with well-established exhibition records. The gallery also occasionally showcases works by promising emerging artists.

Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art
1288 N. Palm Ave. Sarasota, FL 34236

www.allyngallup.com


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The Allure of Collage at Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art

November 14 – December 29, 2012
Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art, Sarasota FL

The exhibit features mixed-media work by Leslie Fry, Joan Giordano, Brian Haverlock, Tom Judd, Mario Naves, Neltje, Gustavo Ramos Rivera, Erika Lawlor Schmidt and Josette Urso

November 14 – December 29, 2012
Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art, Sarasota FL

A reception, with artists, is December 14, 5-7 p.m. The exhibit features mixed-media work by Leslie Fry, (St. Petersburg), Joan Giordano (New York), Brian Haverlock (Montclair, N.J.), Tom Judd (Philadelphia), Mario Naves (New York), Neltje ( Banner, WY), Gustavo Ramos Rivera (San Francisco), Erika Lawlor Schmidt (Pawlet, VT )and Josette Urso (New York).

Former Ringling College instructor Brian Haverlock holds an M.A. in theology from Washington Theological Union, as well as a B.F.A. in painting from East Carolina University. He is currently enrolled at Montclair State University’s MFA program. Haverlock is a 2007-08 recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant, among other awards, and his works have been featured in solo and group exhibitions throughout the U.S. Haverlock’s work expresses recalled memories and sensitive reflections of events, situations and individuals he has met, known, or experienced. Using as inspiration the initial manifestation of mechanized art daguerreotypes, the artist incorporates those earlier vocabularies as he combines with precise drawing techniques pencil the images and visual syntax of a uniquely recombined and delightfully innocent vision of reality into miniature artworks. Haverlock’s images delight and surprise the viewer with their grandeur and often poignant simplicity and visual complexity.

Leslie Fry‘s sculpture and works on paper have been exhibited in solo and group exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout the United States and abroad. Fry says that her works on paper begin “by pressing a plant into paper and seeing what grows from that. These images express moments of wholeness created out of fragmentation.”

Joan Giordano has enjoyed nearly 30 solo shows and has taken part in countless group exhibitions nationally and internationally. She was invited to create installations at the First International Women Artists Biennale in Korea; the Sofia Paper Biennial in Bulgaria, and the Sosabeol International Art Expo Flame Show, 2011. Of her work, the esteemed art critic, Joan Altabe, wrote: “In Giordano’s hands, paper—the marble of modern sculpture—ranges beyond history, past prehistory, back to places of legend where paintings had magical function.”

Allure of Collage: I Work Like a River by Neltje

The artist Neltje says she strives “to make the sensed visible, to balance the interior reality of passion with the external condition of form.” Since 1985, she says, her life has been her artwork. “I create because I am driven to define moments, emotional responses to the natural world, and the chaos that seems to be life’s breath. My senses live on red alert. All of them. I am sustained by, obsessed with, my soul filled to brimming virtually daily, by the grand, the infinitesimal, the lightest and the darkest of images and insights. My passions fierce and demanding enforce me to forge a whole of reverie and reality. I paint.”

Tom Judd first exhibited his art work at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, where, at 25, he was included in a survey show entitled, “Contemporary Drawing: Philadelphia,” curated by Ann Percy and Frank Goodyear. The museum purchased a work from that exhibit for their permanent collection. Judd went on to exhibit his work in distinguished commercial galleries. In the 90’s, Judd had a 10-year retrospect at the Philadelphia Art Alliance. Judd has also participated in many public art projects, including a billboard next to an interstate 76 in Philadelphia ; and a 70-foot chalk drawing in Salt Lake City in 1997.

Mario Naves is an artist, critic and teacher. He says that his art “is a form of painting disguised as collage. My criticism abjures the marketplace for what meets the eye. My teaching encourages burgeoning artists to question just what it is exactly they’re getting into and how to do it well.” Naves’ work has been written about in The New York Times, Art in America, The Village Voice, Time Out New York, and other formats. He has been the recipient of awards from The National Endowment for the Arts, The E.D. Foundation, the George Sugarman Foundation, The National Academy of Design and the Pollock-Krasner Foundation. His writing has been published in Slate, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Sun, Smithsonian, ARTS Magazine, New Art Examiner, and The New York Observer, where his column, “Currently Hanging,” appeared on a weekly basis from 1999-2009.

Gustavo Ramos Rivera is an abstract painter whose work is celebrated nationally for its intense emotional content and its unique, personal symbology. His paintings combine the palette and iconography of the indigenous cultural heritage of his native Mexico with classic techniques of post-war American abstraction. In his works, Rivera constructs layers of intense translucent color fields upon which he lays simple hieroglyphic markings of rich impasto which seem at once archaic and contemporary. They articulate a poetic narrative but also express the artist’s pure delight in working the medium of oil paint. In addition to his painting Rivera is also a master printmaker who works in monotypes, intaglio and lithography. He has also produced unique and limited edition artist books illustrated with original art.

Erika Lawlor Schmidt has forged a career as a visual and performing artist whose work is deeply shaped by investigations into Eastern philosophy and Indian mysticism. Schmidt received her B.F.A. from the University of South Florida in Tampa and did post-baccalaureate studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She later earned an M.F.A. from the University of South Florida, where she founded the Vital Spark Performance Group, a collaborative interdisciplinary ensemble that has traveled to major U.S. cities and throughout Europe. She says that her work is “shaped by the recognition and inquiry to cyclical tendencies, including the contemplation of life cycles: birth, death and rebirth or the possibility for reincarnation. I have been interested in this all my life.”

Allure of Collage: Lemon Ice by Josette Urso

Josette Urso says that she is wants “to push the visual matrix to a crescendo just before breakdown, to find, in T.S. Eliot’s phrase, ‘The still point of the turning world.’ There is a gamble involved in this, and my circular arrangements put me in mind of roulette wheels, just as they provide an insight into the spectral nature of consciousness. Urso is the recipient of numerous fellowships, including two grants from The Pollock-Krasner Foundation. She has also received The Basil H. Alkazzi Painting Award (2000), a MidAtlantic HEA (1994), grants from Art Matters, Inc. (1988) and The Ruth Chenven Foundation (1988) as well as an Individual Artist Fellowship from the Florida State Arts Council (1986). Urso has had more than 30 solo exhibitions and has participated in more than 200 group shows around the world.

For more information about this exhibit, call 941-366-2454 or visit www.allyngallup.com. The gallery is at 1288 N. Palm Ave., in Sarasota.


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The Goods: Weekend News (04.13.12)

Sarasota Visual Art’s round up of information, upcoming exhibitions, and events. Claudia Ryan, Mindy Solomon Gallery, Myakka River wilderness, SCF, Best of Ringling

Featured Artist: Claudia Ryan

Claudia Ryan is one of the major female abstracts artists in the Sarasota/Bradenton area. A 2006 graduate of USF’s MFA program and Ringling College Graduate, Ryan has shown with Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art, the Clayton Galleries, Bleu Acier Gallery, and currently lives and works in Bradenton, Florida.

Wild 3: Artists and Animals of Myakka

April 12 – Featuring an exciting presentation of paintings, original prints, drawings and photographs deciphering the fauna of the Myakka River wilderness by prominent artists.

“Why Sculpture Matters” by Board of Directors of the Sarasota Season of Sculpture

April 13 – Speakers and panel members include esteemed artists, arts educators and cultural critics.

2012 Best of Ringling Annual Juried Exhibitions

April 13 – Juried work by Ringling College first year students and upperclass students in the departments of Advertising Design, Computer Animation, Digital Film, Fine Arts, Graphic & Interactive Communications, Illustration, Interior Design, Motion Design and Photography & Digital Imaging will be featured.

Mindy Solomon Gallery presents “Explicit Content”

April 14 – An exotic showcase of uninhibited, sexually arousing perspectives. Opening and artist talk Saturday, April 14.

SCF Showcases Student Art

April 13 – An annual juried SCF Student Art Exhibition featuring the best artwork produced by State College of Florida, Manatee-Sarasota (SCF) students in the 2011-12 academic year.

Featured Artist: Claudia Ryan

Claudia Ryan is one of the major female abstracts artists in the Sarasota/Bradenton area. A 2006 graduate of USF’s MFA program and Ringling College Graduate, Ryan has shown with Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art, the Clayton Galleries, Bleu Acier Gallery, and currently lives and works in Bradenton, Florida.

Claudia Ryan is one of the major female abstracts artists in the Sarasota / Bradenton area. A 2006 graduate of USF’s MFA program and Ringling College Graduate, Ryan has shown with Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art, the Clayton Galleries, Bleu Acier Gallery, and currently lives and works in Bradenton, Florida. At 60, her grand and intense, yet personal style of painting, revels a complex and impressive voice of art today. Below is an interview with the artist.

Untitled, Watercolor on Paper, 30x44 inches

sVA: What are you currently working on?

Currently, I am working on large drawings. I feel closest to my drawings, which are really a mixture of painting and drawing. I work a lot on paper. It’s a faster release for me to work quickly in a drawing mode on a large piece of paper with a piece of charcoal or pastel, even though I use liquid media too.

I work from my imagination from the inside out, rather than from direct observation. I like drawing with the movement of my whole body. I feel that I connect faster to my unconscious that way. If I start to be too aware about what I am doing, things usuallly don’t work out. My work is an ongoing process. I just think of it as something I do.

Untitled, Etching, 14x16 inches, 2011

sVA: In your lifetime, you have experienced or been witness to many events, people, and places. Does one or some of these have more influence on your work than others?

I am fairly old I guess, I’ll be 60 on my next birthday so, yes, that’s a long time. Really it’s all like a big blob in my head. Sometimes I think there is nothing that can compare to what is happening in the present, especially the events of the last ten years, but then the present is sometimes the most unclear or scariest thing for me to focus on. I am always nervous about things, about the future, but I am trapped in the past most of the time. There are a lot of timelines in there running in me, all existing simultaneously. I mean, I carry the past with me, like everybody else, and it just follows along, but I think the sixties, and in particular the British invasion of popular culture in the US, had the biggest effect on me. The Beatles were the most exciting thing that ever happened to me, even though that seems funny to say! I started to notice art and be aware of art history at that time, between the ages of 11 and 14. Art was like this big container opening up in my life and a great discovery and I felt like this whole conversation could contain me and it was the first thing that really made sense, even though I was going through a lot of personal emotional tumult.

I wasn’t discretionary then at all between “high” and “low” art. It was that moment when everything mixed in me in this very intense visual way: the Keane girl paintings at the mall with their big eyes and Mary Quant styles, Milton Glaser/ Seymour Chwast posters all combined with Van Gogh and Francis Bacon and Bellini and Vermeer. There was the whole Pop and Op style thing with its incredibly kinetic lines and bright colors that infused fashion and music and movies, and there were all those album covers.

I was painfully shy and going through adolescence, and I remember dying inside this electric yellow plastic raincoat. It is all in my head together, everything a big mix just like now, that whole era with its terrible dark parts and light parts, sort of everything, like riding on this big wave. I remember attending the New York World’s Fair in 1964 and filing past the Pieta on a conveyer belt. They had the sculpture shipped over in this special, unsinkable container. It sounds crazy now. There was still a feeling then of everything progressing towards some modern utopian-Jetson cartoon type of paradise. But that whole narrative was really starting to seriously fall away about that time too, and the pressure of that collapsing is still an enormous influence on my outlook.

Untitled, Etching Chine-collé on buff paper, 14x22 inches

sVA: What currently inspires you to paint?

Feelings of isolation.

sVA: What do you think of when you create?

I am doubting what I am doing is any good all the time, because most of it isn’t any good, in fact I am surprised most of the time by how little I have to show for myself as an artist.

sVA: What elements do you consider most important in your work?

Lines and colors. Black is very important, I can’t seem to do without it. I try sometimes to leave it out, just to see if I can.

Untitled, Ink and Watercolor on paper, 12x18 inches, 2009

sVA: Does the Sarasota-Bradenton art scene have any influence on your work?

I am still a pretty shy person and I hole up in my studio, so I admit social interaction is never high on my list of things.

I drive up and down 41 a lot because of my job, and I am always noticing what has changed and what’s still there after the 40 some years that I’ve lived here off and on. It’s a fantasticly weird jumble of time and images that goes through my head. It’s kind of scary! My favorite thing is driving by the airport at night or very early morning.

This area – the artists mentors I’ve met here – have been nurturing to me. Almost since I came back, I was able to make prints in the shop at Ringling College, and I was helped so much and welcomed. And when I enrolled in Ringling finally to finish my degree, the friends I made and artists I met, some who live and work here still, have enriched my existence. I count my blessings. I’ve been very fortunate to live here, and that’s an understatement.

Also, when I returned in the late eighties the gallery scene here was still pretty active, like it was in many places then, and I benefited directly from that. Things seem to be pretty exciting right now with a new generation of artists and the promise of a Contemporary Art Museum in the future. I wonder what that will be like.

Untitled, Mixed media on paper, 44x52 inches, 2011

sVA: What role does history play in your work if any?

I feel like a historical invention sometimes, or that history is always inventing me somehow. I want to invent my own history.

sVA: How important are titles in your work, and if so where do they come from?

I often envy titles in others work. Titles can really complement a piece. Aso they help in an archival sense, I mean in keeping track of things. This question of titled/untitled used to really bother me!

I remember reading an artist once being interviewed about this and they said they believed the caption”Untitled” was really a title, in a bad sort of way, I mean, like a kind of dead code or a pose, or something.

Now, I dont think its so important, so I am not wasting time worrying over it. I rarely title my work.

Untitled, Pastel and Watercolor on paper, 59x78 inches, 2011

sVA: It always varies from one artist to the next. How do you know when a work of yours is complete?

I have to go away from it for a little while, and if it holds up upon my return, then, well, maybe, or I keep repeatting this action. Sometimes you can be too close and you can’t even see something you’ve done, or the opposite, you are reading too much into it and it falls empty and flat. Actually sometimes I don’t know. Sometimes if somebody else sees something and thinks its done, then I think it’s done. Sometimes I throw it out I hate it so much. I’m a wimp at decision making.

sVA: What is in the future for Claudia Ryan and her work?

Just living and keeping on working and making things I hope! I want to work on my painting and writing, and I want to work on illustrating a book of poems.

Untitled, Townscape, Ink and Marker on Mylar, 2007