In Process

In Process is an exhibition of new works from artists Dustin Juengel, Noelle McCleaf, Nathan Skiles, Sarah Viviana Valdez, and Tom Winchester.

Friday, January 27, 2017 (6PM -8PM)
3080 N Washington Blvd, #40, Sarasota

Media on view include photo-realistic and abstract painting, color and black-and-white photography, and video installation. Each artwork represents the artist’s individual style, as well as the commonality of an investigative approach.

Facebook Event Link: https://www.facebook.com/events/1391918094182614/

Meet the Artists

Dustin Juengel
Dustin Juengel earned a BFA in Illustration from Ringling College of Art and Design and a MA in Fine Arts from Chelsea College of Art and Design. He is a visiting Faculty member in the FA department at Ringling College and serves as exhibition curator for Art Center Sarasota. His work has been exhibited in the U.S., UK and Germany.

Dustin Juengel
Dustin Juengel

Noelle McCleaf
For In Process, I will be exhibiting new photographs from the Cassadaga Spiritualist Camp in Cassadaga, Florida. I’ve been fascinated by spiritualism and the metaphysical world for most of my life, and I’ve touched on these themes in previous bodies of work. I plan to return to this vibrant community and explore the landscape and its residents as I build upon this new series.

“Spiritualism is the science, philosophy, and religion based upon the principle of continuous life, demonstrated through mediumship”, (Cassadaga Spiritualist Camp, Rev. Mary Rose Gray).

Modern spiritualism began in the 1840s, and still continues today at the Cassadaga Spiritualist Camp in Cassadaga, Florida. Spirit Doors were used during séances so spirits could enter and exit homes easily. Many of them still remain on homes in Cassadaga, but have been closed due to obvious dangers. Spiritualists do not believe in the concept of ghosts, but spirits, who are allowed to come and go, and are not “stuck” as ghosts are often described.

Noelle McCleaf
Noelle McCleaf

Nathan Skiles
Nathan Skiles lives and works in Sarasota, FL and is an instructor at the Ringling College of and Design. Recent exhibitions include: The Clockmaker’s Apprentice, The Hunterdon Art, Clinton, NJ; Black Forest / White Lightning, Sloan Fine Art, New York, NY; Welcome to Tartarus, Welcome to Valhalla, Greene Contemporary, New York, NY

Nathan Skiles
Nathan Skiles

Sarah Viviana Valdez
Valdez’s work is an investigation on play within order, which has been a common occurrence all throughout her undergraduate work up to present. She currently works in a variety of platforms. The medium of curation allows her to assemble exhibitions as a way to often challenge the institution and its predecessors. She uses live performances combining sound and visuals to explore the malleability of environments, both spatially and on the level of human interaction (the audience-performer relationship). Her primary focus as of late has been the use of digital processes in conjunction with microbial substance, under the loose guise of fashion.

Valdez has been working with unconventional materials that biodegrade in order to merge biology with technology. The proliferation of new technological products assimilated into our daily lives has softened our natural senses and is in the process of divorcing humanity from its very ‘human’-ness. Her use of biological and technological materials proposes a needed identity for herself and to our developing counter-culture — to establish a true connection to the natural decaying world by having a symbiotic exchange with the objects we wear as our second skin. Valdez believes that working with multiple tools and platforms creates pathways within each medium and transforms them into useful objectives to aggregate desire, leisure and productivity for the viewer and herself.

Sarah Viviana Valdez
Sarah Viviana Valdez

Tom Winchester
The Black-and-White series is a collection of traditional, black-and-white photographs, created using thirty-five-millimeter film, that are printed in ways which guide viewers’ interpretations toward theories of postmodernism.

This is accomplished by including nuanced cues that expose the physical elements of the medium, in an attempt to create unique objects that allegorically counteract the infinite reproducibility of digital photographs.

By photographing places and objects that illustrate themes of banality, simulation, and fragmentation, then subsequently printing those images in a traditional process that can degrade, stain, or be subject to arbitrary variations outside of my control, the Black-and-White series utilizes photography’s affinity for depiction in order to convey a sense of lost reality.

Tom Winchester
Tom Winchester

3080 N Washington Blvd, #40, Sarasota, FL

“It’s All In How You See It” by Pamela Beck

I often think about how the origin and destinations of a work of art affect the viewer’s perception of its worth. Recently I was given an abstract painting as a gift.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.

I often think about how the origin and destinations of a work of art affect the viewer’s perception of its worth. Recently I was given an abstract painting as a gift. It was purchased at a flea market for one hundred dollars, where it was found leaning against a junky chair on the sidewalk. I don’t know who the artist is, the signature is illegible—but it’s a strong painting. It probably had a much finer life before it wound up on the streets of the city, a victim of one or more of life’s inevitable 4 D’s: Death, Divorce, Dinero or Disaster.

painting

People who see this work hanging in my home have a strong reaction to it: “Masterful,” says one. “Strong,” says another. “New York School,” says a third. “Latin American,” say others.

“Where did you get it?” they ask and name a local gallery or two or wonder if I bought it in New York.

If I answer that I bought my flea market painting from a prestigious New York gallery, the painting might suddenly appear to be more important and the artist more talented. If I say that the artist’s work can be found in a respected museum’s permanent collection, then my painting might seem more serious and the artist more vetted.

When I reply that, judging from the other things for sale at this flea market, my painting was one step away from death by dumpster, I notice that people become confused. Perhaps they wonder if they should like something that others thought worthless. Perhaps the painting suddenly looks like the work of a dilettante. One way or another, all find it sad to imagine someone’s creative efforts treated so disrespectfully. Nobody thinks that the painting deserved to be tossed on the street looking as forlorn and miserable as Anne Hathaway in Les Miserables.

And then there’s the issue of the well-made frame. It’s simple but expensive. Even if you don’t know about frames, you can tell by its skillful construction. There’s an assumption that a well-framed painting must be valuable. People don’t often put an expensive frame on a cheap painting. It influences people in their first impressions of the painting because the work is presented so well.

I’m not sure what fate awaits my painting. If I’m lucky, it’ll stay in my sunny Sarasota living room for years to come. After that, will my daughter want it? Will it stay with her throughout her life and be passed along to her children? Or will she sell it so that it moves along to live with a new owner?

Maybe somebody will be able to identify the artist one day. Maybe someone will kick a hole in the painting and that’ll be that. Or could be, as the saying goes, the more things change the more they stay the same. Maybe many years from now, the whole process will start all over again and the painting will wind up like it started with me: someone will be scrounging around a flea market and gleefully discover the painting on a dirty city street, leaning against something once known as a desktop computer.


To read more about Pamela, view these links:
http://srxq.blogspot.com/
http://whatdogsreallythink.blogspot.com/