Cunsthaus presents We Want A President

In continuing efforts to provide engaging cultural programs and experiences through a collaborative and feminist curatorial perspective, Cunsthaus is proud to present its first juried exhibition.

January 21st – February 18th
4634 N. Florida Avenue, Tampa, FL

Opening on the first day of a new and controversial presidential term, while marches are being organized around the globe in support of equal rights, this all-media exhibition features works inspired by artist Zoe Leonard’s 1992 manifesto “I want a president” and is intended to incite reflection, discussion and activism that explores our demands and desires for a Head of State. With works selected by guest juror Margaret Miller, Director of University of South Florida’s Institute for Research in Art, exhibiting artists include Monique Blom, Will Douglas, Keiff Jones, Vincent Karl, Daniela Mora, Libbi Ponce, Ivan Riascos, and Julie Wills with The Bridge Collaborative.

We Want a President
The Bridge Collaborative, Wish We Were Here (White House), 2016. Color postcard.

About the Juror:
Margaret Miller is a tenured Professor in the School of Art and Art History and Director of the Institute for Research in Art at the University of South Florida in Tampa, Florida. The Institute for Research in Art is dedicated to organizing and presenting exhibitions and commissioning works by internationally significant emerging and acclaimed artists. Miller holds an MA degree from the University of Hawaii in Asian Art History. From 1978 to 2001 she served as Director of the USF Contemporary Art Museum and in 2001 was appointed to also serve as Director of Graphicstudio, USF’s renowned art production atelier. The Contemporary Art Museum, Graphicstudio and USF’s Public Art Program form the Institute for Research in Art in the College of The Arts. During her tenure at USF she has taught at both the undergraduate and graduate levels and curated numerous exhibitions with accompanying catalogues.

About CUNSTHAUS:
CUNSTHAUS was established in the spring of 2016 by fourteen women in the Tampa Bay-area with practices in education, visual art, music, curation, and writing. Sited next to artist-run gallery space Tempus Projects, established in 2009, CUNSTHAUS is further developing the Seminole Heights neighborhood as an arts destination. Offering unique exhibitions and events spanning a range of media and a varied survey of artists, CUNSTHAUS’ primary mission is to create a space for artistic expression, dialogue and reflection contributing to the arts community within the local neighborhood of Seminole Heights and the Tampa Bay region.


Feminist Art Collective Cunsthaus presents
We Want A President
January 21st – February 18th
4634 N. Florida Avenue, Tampa, FL

www.tempus-projects.com
tempusprojects.art@gmail.com
813.340.9056

Tempus Projects Presents: YOU DRAIN ME

Tempus Projects presents YOU DRAIN ME, a new group exhibition featuring the artwork of Ryann Slauson, Jamie Steele, Maria Britton, Aliza Morell, Becky Flanders, April Childers, Wendy Babcox, Langdon Graves, and Leslie Vigeant.

January 21, 2017
Opening Reception (7PM – 9PM)
Tempus Projects, Tampa

Through a variety of media from artists based throughout the country, the exhibition sets its focus on melancholic themes often coupled with tenderness. The work highlighted in YOU DRAIN ME evoke a poignancy at times softened by unexpected humor. As the title suggests, the collection reflects a psychological continuum stretching across the taxing nature of complex emotional states and its the release of catharsis.

I AM THE DOOR THAT NO MAN CAN SHUT by Becky Flanders
I AM THE DOOR THAT NO MAN CAN SHUT by Becky Flanders

Artist Maria Britton, for example, pairs the immediacy of her improvisational painting with the especially intimate support of found patterned bed sheets. The comfort, emotional and physical, associated with such bedding is interrupted by knots plaited into the fabric, stains of acrylic paint blossoming like hazy memories and forceful brushwork motifs.

Ambivalent by Ryann Slauson
Ambivalent by Ryann Slauson

Similarly, the work of Langdon Graves presents domestic objects eerily emptied of their functionality, thereby foregrounding its deeply complex accretion of memories and emotional associations. Other artists such as Ryann Slauson and April Childers commandeer popular and familiar imagery, liberating such visuals of their overt significance in favor of an ambiguity that sparks unexpected associations, narratives and personal recollections.

Not Exactly by Langdon Graves
Not Exactly by Langdon Graves

The artwork of YOU DRAIN ME circumvents a tinny sentimentality toward eliciting a genuine sense of pathos. It sets off from an unabashed contemporary context–an image saturated and hyperconnected landscape–and candidly investigates the activity of an inner panorama.

The event is sponsored in part by The Gobioff Foundation, The Arts Council of Hillsborough County, Stanton Storer Embrace the Arts Foundation, The Knox Family Foundation, and Mermaid Tavern. Please join us for an afterparty at the Mermaid Tavern directly following the reception at 9pm.

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/721592507996085/


Tempus Projects
4636 N Florida Ave.Tampa, FL 33603
www.tempus-projects.com
tempusprojects.art@gmail.com
813.340.9056

About Tempus Projects

TEMPUS PROJECTS is dedicated to nurturing established and emerging local, national and international artists through exhibitions and events. The non-profit organization promotes artists working in all media and originates, organizes, and hosts exhibitions that engage the Tampa Bay community through the visual arts. Established in 2009, TEMPUS PROJECTS has presented numerous exhibitions and art-related programs featuring the work of dynamic and engaging artists and collaborators.

Located on Florida Avenue in South Seminole Heights, TEMPUS PROJECTS has contributed greatly to the district’s emergence as a unique and creative local destination. In acknowledgment of its contributions to the arts and the community, Tampa’s Creative Loafing has awarded it the Best Alternative Art Space award for four years in a row. TEMPUS PROJECTS has worked in collaboration with Experimental Skeleton, Silver Meteor Gallery, Bluebird Books, Tampa’s Downtown Partnership and Creative Loafing.

Sarasota Visual Artists Open Studios – January 2017

Sarasota Visual Artists Studio 1Sarasota Visual Artists Studios is a FREE Open Studio Series on the 1st Saturday of the Month January – April 11am-4pm.

Open Studio Series is the collaboration of a diverse group of local visual artists sharing their studios with the community. Visitors are encouraged to openly discuss the varied processes with each artist in the environment where it all begins.

The 2017 SVAS artists include: Duncan Chamberlain, Joseph H Melancon, Bill Buchman, Andrea Dasha Reich, Jack Dowd, Elena De La Ville, Jorge Blanco, Vicky Randall, Tim Jaeger, and Tom Stephens.

January Sarasota Open Studio Artists January Open Studio Locations

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1617730111855368/

An Open Invitation: E-mail Collaboration Project

An Open Invitation e-mail project is a collaboration inspired by Miranda July‘s We Think Alone and mail art. AOI e-mail collaboration began September 2013 and was completed January 31st, 2014. Using text, image, video, sound, or a mixture of two or more, 17 participants — both local and nationally based — responded to an e-mail they received that was created by the previous participant. Below, each participant is organized into numerical order — indicating the order in which they participated and who created what piece, along with their bio.

 

1.

Transferring

A

Line

From

Kasey Lou Lindley

Your

Back

To

The

Wall

2.

AOI

3.

newpainting

4.

photo-366

5.

6.

1 two sketches for the sound seagulls make in slow motion

7.

8.

9.

10.

AOI2sm

11.

ghost (100dpi)

12.

cloud_an

13.

14.

OvernighT

15.

AOI-image

16.

trishriley

17.

benp

 

1. Kasey Lou Lindley
‘Transferring A Line From Your Back To The Wall’
Kasey Lou Lindley was born in San Francisco, California and raised in Utah. She studied at the New York Studio Program, received her BFA from the Ringling College of Art & Design, and her MFA from the University of Connecticut. Kasey currently lives and works in Sarasota, FL.

2. Egan Victoria Franks
‘Where Would You Like Me to Put This Window’
Egan Victoria Franks is originally from Detroit and recently completed her BFA at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago with a focus in painting.

3. Holly Jarvis
Weber State University ’12 BFA
Lives and works in Ogden, Utah

4. Shauna Lee Lange
Shauna Lee Lange is solely self-taught with no formal arts education (as a visual artist). She now has ten solo shows scheduled through 2015 for Charlotte County’s Public Art Program, featuring her Microcircles Series. Lange is a Rhode Island native, raised in Massachusetts.

5. Daniel Miller
Daniel Miller graduated from Ringling College in 2003 and currently resides in Sarasota, Florida. Professionally Daniel is a Creative Director for an international ecommerce company. Daniel also makes video art and realist oil paintings.

6. Reuben Kern
‘Two Sketches for the Sound Seagulls Make in Slow Motion’
Reuben Kern received his BFA from Ringling College of Art and Design, and he lives in Bradenton Florida.

7. Regan Stacey
‘Memo’
Regan Stacey holds an M.F.A in Visual Art from the Art Institute of Boston at Lesley University in Boston, MA, a B.S. in Biology from The Pennsylvania State University, and a Grand Diploma in Pastry Arts from the French Culinary Institute in NYC. She retired as a world ranked open water marathon swimmer in 2001 with a solo swim across the English Channel. Additionally, she ran a custom cake business for ten years before committing fully to the arts. This diverse background continues to inform her art and visual language. Stacey is an award-winning photographer whose photograms have exhibited across the US and in Europe. Her most recent work has shifted from the photographic to the sculptural, allowing her a more direct approach to materials. Entropy is a common theme in Stacey’s work as it relates to a functioning breakdown of order and form, communication and perception. Her latest project addresses the conceptual relationship between the naming of colors and miscommunication.

8. Lani Asuncion
Lani received her MFA from the University of Connecticut in Interdisciplinary Studies. She has a working studio at Erector Square in New Haven, CT; and teaches Video in the Film, Video, and Interactive Media Dept. at Quinnipiac University. She creates abstract narratives that reference local stories and histories that indirectly reference her own multicultural background.

9. Jeremy Fisher
‘Somewhere Soon’
Audio: “March Into The Sun” by EveryDaySoundTrack
Jeremy Fisher received his BFA from the Ringling College of Art and Design. Jeremy currently lives in Los Angeles and works for Stoopid Buddy Stoodios.

10. Katie Lee Mansfield
BFA: Tufts University, School of the Museum of Fine Arts
MFA: University of Connecticut
Lives & works in Framingham, MA

11. Gregory N. Dirr
Gregory N. Dirr received his BFA from the Ringling College of Art and Design. Currently Gregory lives and works out of Boca Raton. thoughtcoalitionHQ.com

12. Nicole Shiflet
Nicole Shiflet is a tactile painter and a technological art geek, constantly searching for ways to balance both aspects in her work. She was born in Wisconsin, grew up in Georgia, and currently resides in Baltimore. She received her BFA from the University of Georgia in Drawing and Painting and her MFA from the University of Maryland Baltimore County in Imaging and Digital Art.

13. Sarah Viviana Valdez
‘Splicing Clouds’
Sarah Viviana Valdez is a Kansas born artist who lives and works in Tampa, Florida. Valdez graduated with class of 2010 from Ringling School of Art and Design Fine Art department, and participated in the New York Studio Residency Program, Spring of 2009.

14. Jorge Valenzuela
‘OvernighT’
Jorge Valenzuela received his BFA from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston. Jorge currently lives in Bradenton, FL.

15. Natalya Swanson
Natalya Swanson is a Senior at the University of South Florida working towards a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History. After she graduates, Natalya hopes to continue with her education, pursuing a Masters degree in Art Conservation. Although Natalya spends much of her time in Tampa at school and at the Centre Gallery where she is an Art Director, she currently resides in Sarasota, where she enjoys exploring new art mediums.

16. Trish Riley
Trish Riley received her BFA from The School of the Museum of Fine Arts & Tufts University. Trish currently lives and works in Bradenton, FL.

17. Ben Piwowar
Ben Piwowar Received his MFA from the University of Connecticut in 2011. He lives and works in Baltimore.

To participate in future AOI events and projects, you can contact Kasey Lou Lindley at: kaseylou20@gmail.com

Incredible Journey: Interview with Emma Thurgood

I’ve been engaged in this ongoing dialogue about support for local contemporary art for quite some time now. Ever since I moved to Sarasota, FL I have experienced a vast amount of creative energy that feels underground, for the most part. Contemporary art collectives and gallery spaces crop up every now and then, which is great because creatives can see Sarasota’s vast potential — the only problem is that they don’t seem to stick for very long. So I wonder; how do we get to a point where new collectives and galleries can become established, and when these new collectives and galleries do become established they, in turn, become a catalyst for new spaces and groups until a domino effect is created? We have a good number of resources, but I think we still need to consider more support from current established institutions, so that artists (young and old) have more of an incentive to stay and help strengthen our art community. For example, when I was recently living in Utah, I loved going to the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art and CUAC because, not only could I view the work of artists living in Los Angeles, Chicago, New York City, Berlin, etc., but I could also view contemporary art that was created by Utah artists! UMOCA even has a “locals only gallery” with a stipend included to help fund each exhibition within that space — AND the work that I saw continually blew my mind because I was viewing powerful, compelling artwork that was created outside of a major art center perspective — it was all new and fresh. I was viewing contemporary art about subjects that were specifically related to the location I was in and that added a whole other dimension to my experience as a viewer. It was also quite clear that these artists were very aware of the contemporary art world, were referencing aspects of it, but not necessarily mimicking it per se — they were adding their own perspective to what I consider an ongoing creative discussion, and it was coming from a Utah perspective. So that makes me think; how amazing would it be to go anywhere in the world and be able to view contemporary art that is representative of that location and its artists’ perspectives, while also being able to view artwork created by emerging and established, national and international, artists in the same space? To me, that would be highly fascinating! Fortunately for Sarasota, I’ve found that Art Center Sarasota is doing just that, and making quite an exciting impression in the process. I recently contacted Art Center Sarasota’s Exhibitions Coordinator, Emma Thurgood, to discuss the Art Center’s 2013-2014 season of exhibitions.

KLL: What is, and has been, your vision for Art Center Sarasota since you started your current position?

ET: My vision for the Art Center’s Exhibitions Program is to grow it to be a leader in Sarasota’s contemporary arts scene. For me, that means showing a variety of art year round that is visually interesting, thought provoking, and creates a memorable experience that they can’t get anywhere else in the area. I’ve been at the Art Center for a year and a half now, and I feel like we are on a great path with those ideas. For the last few exhibitions, visitors have been telling me, “This is the best show I’ve ever been to in Sarasota.” They said that about “Florida Flavor”, they said that about “African Nouveau” and “Leaf | Textile | Purpose” and I think the trend will continue on through the Incredible Journey Season.

KLL: Art Center Sarasota’s 2013-2014 season of exhibitions is titled Incredible Journey; why was that title selected and what should viewers expect to experience during the Incredible Journey season?

ET: Last season was called Southern Exposure for a reason: 20 of the 22 exhibitions we produced were exclusively Florida artists. It was a huge success in highlighting the amazing talents of Florida artists. Now, with Incredible Journey, we’re taking viewers on explorations of different art forms and concepts in art, as well as drawing artists from further afield than we normally do. In the past, it was very rare that our curated shows included artists that were outside of the Florida region. This season, we are presenting artists from across America and we have started the eight-year international exhibition program, “Confluence.” This program is an initiative I started where we will be showcasing artists from the countries in which Sarasota has a sister city. This year it’s Israel, 2015 is Russia.

I think this season is going to take some viewers’ way outside of their comfort zone. There are a lot of shows on the docket that present works that many people aren’t accustomed to seeing in Sarasota. For me, this is all part of creating a dialogue about what art is and can mean that will break down some barriers that have been put up.

KLL: We’ve talked a lot about fostering more support for local artists and creating an incentive for recent graduates to continue to live and work as artists in Sarasota; how is Art Center Sarasota contributing to this goal?

ET: Our main contribution towards encouraging students to stay in Sarasota is through Black Box Projects. It is specifically for students and recent graduates to produce an ambitious project. The Art Center provides an exhibition space and time, as well as some financial resources to see the vision of a student come to life. This contributes to their understanding of real world skills because they have to write a professional proposal to be considered and they have to produce the show.  Because we schedule so far out in advance, a candidate could be a student when they apply for the Project, but already graduated when the Project finally comes on display in the gallery. Secondly, we have juried shows year round, and students and young artists who have been submitting have been winning awards and selling their work regularly over the past six months. Sarasota in general is a great place for that kind of success, too. In my research of other centers like Art Center Sarasota across the country, very few regions are like ours in that they offer so many exhibition opportunities year round across multiple venues. The rate for being selected to hang in a juried exhibit is very high, as well. In other shows across the country, you are competing with hundreds, sometimes thousands of people and only a small handful will be selected. In the Art Center’s juried shows, we receive around 300 submissions from about 200 artists and hang approximately 140-160 pieces. In the current juried show, “miniatures,” we have 244 pieces on display from a submission pool of 345. Those are some great odds for artists.

KLL: In your opinion, why should there be support for local contemporary art in Sarasota?

ET: A city is only as old as its youngest member. If the art scene continues to alienate the younger artists and audiences as it has in years past, they’ll find somewhere else to go where they feel like they belong. It’s a difficult challenge to deal with, especially as a non-profit, because the young people are not always the financial supporters of an organization. But organizations need to cultivate the next round of supporters because, as with all things, times and people change.

Art Center Sarasota does a pretty good job walking this tightrope, I think. I try to make sure that there is something on display for everyone. I have at any given time over 300 artworks on display in the building and they’re all different.  No person should be leaving the center saying that there was not a single piece they liked. It’s impossible.

KLL: What advice would you give to recent graduates about establishing an art practice/career in Sarasota and/or its neighboring communities?

ET: Get involved! It’s hard for students, between classes and jobs, but seriously, there’s still enough down time in their life for them to carve out even twenty minutes a week to go and look at what’s on display in a gallery. The more involved they can become in the arts scene, the better off they’ll be. They’ll have a better idea of who the players are, they’ll be able to meet and speak with many of them at receptions, and it will give them a better idea of how they fit into the art landscape. One of the things I can’t stand is when a  young artist comes to me to ask me to put on a show of their work and they have no idea who I am or what I do or even anything about my organization. I teach a professional practices class at the center with Elizabeth Hillmann, our Education Coordinator, and one of the things we talk about is gallery etiquette. I live by a simple rule when it comes to that: date your gallery. Be informed about who they are and what they do before you approach them, be respectful of their time, and if they pick you for representation, treat them with the absolute utmost respect and maintain a good relationship.

KLL: What other services does the center provide that the community can get involved with?

ET: Art Center Sarasota has a wide variety of events and public programs throughout the year. I have a great lecture season coming up with Kevin Costello and Baila Miller starting on November 21. We also have a killer education program with tons of classes in painting, sculpture, collage, jewelry and other fun stuff. The full listing of classes and workshops can be found at www.artsarasota.org/education. I’m really looking forward to Paper Arts Week November 18 – 22. Then, in March we have tons of programming to accompany our “Confluence: Israel” exhibit and of course, iconcept on March 28, 2014 where art walks the runway!

KLL: I am thrilled by the variety of art mediums and artists that are, and will be, exhibiting this season. Can you touch upon the importance of a diverse exhibition space that incorporates the work of local, national, and international artists?

ET: The best thing about the space at the Art Center is that we have four different galleries. So I generally show four different shows at any one time. Our largest gallery is always a juried exhibit of predominantly local artists. Some of them come from further afield in Florida, and every now and then we get someone from out of state. The other three galleries are dedicated to curated shows of local artists, community groups and nationally recognized artists.

I think some artists would prefer if we only showed local artists all the time, but as a community center, we are not just here for the local artists, we’re here for the viewers too. That’s a difficult balance to manage sometimes. Showing the work of local artists is great, and I do it as often as I can, but showing that work doesn’t mean anything if no one is coming to look at it. What makes a viewer come to look at the local art that we are displaying as opposed to any of the other venues in town doing the same thing? That’s what our curated show of more recognized artists are for- they get the people in the door to come and see something they can’t anywhere else in town. I couldn’t tell you how many times someone has come in to see one of our shows in the front gallery and then bought something from a local artist out of the juried show. It’s also a benefit for the artists showing that they can say they’ve exhibited at a place that has also exhibited such notables as John Chamberlain, Syd Solomon and many others.  It offers up some shared prestige.

KLL: Can you tell us a little bit about CUBEMUSIC, Sun Boxes, and Pulp Culture?

ET: CUBEMUSIC and Sun Boxes, from Craig Colorusso, are the big blockbusters for the opening of our season. I feel like they really kick off the journey. Sound art is so underrepresented in Sarasota. The only other exhibit I’m aware of is the one at the Ringling in late 2011. But, for that you had to pay to go see it or wait for free Monday, and generally the people that need free Monday have to work on Mondays. What’s a viewer to do? Art Center Sarasota is always free and open to the public during our business hours, Mon-Sat 10a-4p. CUBEMUSIC will be transforming the space of Gallery 1 for the next eight weeks. Its cast light and shadows coupled with the soothing deep resonance of sound creates a truly altering experience of the space.

For viewers who still aren’t able to come and see the art, the art is coming to you! We are so excited to take Craig’s other installation Sun Boxes on the road around Sarasota. We’re stopping at parks and beaches to bring sound art to the masses. Whereas CUBEMUSIC is somewhat dark and ominous in its sound, Sun Boxes is positively ethereal. You can’t help but feel happy when you see them and hear them. The full schedule of the Sun Boxes tour for November and January can be found at www.artsarasota.org/sunboxes.

Pulp Culture is another show opening November 7 that I curated. I wanted to do a fun show about paper because I have such a love for it. I daresay it’s a dangerous addiction. I tried to not be too serious about it and just show fun creative art that would make people smile while educating them about the way that paper can be used for art other than drawing or painting. So far it seems I’ve accomplished my goal because of the feedback I’ve already gotten while I was installing the show.

art center sarasota image

You can view more information about Art Center Sarasota, Sun Boxes, CUBEMUSIC, Pulp Culture, and Emma Thurgood at:

Art Center Sarasota

Backstage Pass: Emma Thurgood curates excitement

Artist Interview: Craig Colorusso