Art Basel Miami Beach” by Pamela Beck

ArtDart by Pamela Beck: Everybody knows that you can’t see everything when you go to Art Basel Miami Beach. It’s not that you don’t want to, you do. You really do.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.

Everybody knows that you can’t see everything when you go to Art Basel Miami Beach. It’s not that you don’t want to, you do. You really do. But there are more than 20 fairs, more than 75,000 visitors, and your mind stops working after several hours of concentrated art viewing and the constant jostling of well-dressed strangers.

Even if you have the stamina to make it to all of the fairs, there’s the not insignificant problem of finding a taxi to actually get you to them. It’s enough to make you stand on a street corner swearing that you’ll never return to Art Basel again… until you remember that the fabulous Design District will be completed about this time, 2014.

I saw many things that delighted me this year. Like this:

“Seer Bonnet XXI [Eliza] and Seer Bonnett XX [Emily]” Bonnets encrusted with thousands of pearl-headed corsage pins Lisa Sette Gallery
“Seer Bonnet XXI [Eliza] and Seer Bonnett XX [Emily]”
Bonnets encrusted with thousands of pearl-headed corsage pins
Lisa Sette Gallery
This is Angela Ellsworth’s strong statement about traditional Mormonism, her own background. (The points of the pins face inward, while the beautiful pearls reflect another message. Sister wives takes on a whole new meaning…]

And this:

“Tiny Landscape Painting, Antigua: Hurricane Sky, Black Jagged Hill” Oil on Polaroid card 1O x 8 cm Ingleby Gallery
“Tiny Landscape Painting, Antigua:
Hurricane Sky, Black Jagged Hill”
Oil on Polaroid card
1O x 8 cm
Ingleby Gallery

Frank Walter lived in an isolated shack in Antigua for 25 years. He suffered from delusions of aristocratic grandeur but produced these simple, powerful works.

And this:

“Ceyx” Graphite and Ink on paper 5O x 38 inches Dillon Gallery
“Ceyx”
Graphite and Ink on paper
5O x 38 inches
Dillon Gallery

Leah Yerpe’s perfectly rendered figures are riveting as they evoke the beauty and mystery of both human and celestial bodies.

And no trip to Miami will ever again be without a stop at the inspiring Perez Art Museum [PAMM], dramatically set against Biscayne Bay.

Photo:  Perez Art Museum Miami Partial View of Ai Weiwei's "Forever" installation of Chinese bicycles
Photo:
Perez Art Museum Miami
Partial View of Ai Weiwei’s “Forever” installation of Chinese bicycles

Herzog & de Meuron designed this jawdroppingly, elegant structure, both contemporary and organic with its use of concrete, wood and pervasive garden and water features. In a distinct “today’s-museum” style, PAMM compellingly combines art, nature, entertainment, leisure and respect for local culture/climate.

Photo: Perez Art Museum Miami Outside view
Photo: Perez Art Museum Miami
Outside view

The beautiful, sprawling entrance immediately stops you in your tracks with its latticed roof, abundant terraces, and plant infused columns hanging from the roof like tropical stalactites.

Inside, the airy exhibition rooms currently display diverse shows including: “Ai Weiwei: According to What,” the powerful political and personal installations of this outspoken critic of the Chinese government. [Ai was prohibited from traveling to see this exhibition.]

And, in contrast, another exhibit, “A Human Document: Selections from the Sackner Collection of Concrete and Visual Poetry,” is private and quiet, where words and images fuse to create fantastic works that span centuries and styles.

A friend asked me if the museum overpowered the art on exhibit. It’s a fair question. Being inside such a beautifully designed and constructed building is undeniably exciting and uplifting, particularly with the pervasive window views of lush gardens and the bay; not to mention the inviting seating areas, both inside and out, that are already crowd-pleasers.

In the end, my friend’s question will be answered by the art on display. Either it will encourage a visitor’s full involvement or it will be overwhelmed by the particulars of this pleasurable museum experience. Interestingly, this built-in competition is a provocative test for the art itself.

The same challenge can be given to the art presented at the Miami art fairs. The works that engaged me in that supercharged, distracting atmosphere are the ones I’ll remember; and the search for them and what they evoked in me, are the reasons I’ll return.

Now all I need is a car and driver.

Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela is Public relations director for Season of Sculpture and a private art consultant. She co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings at Sotheby’s. She was Communications Director of The Essential Element. Pamela has a keen intrest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old. Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee and Institute for the Ages Volunteer.

    To read more about Pamela, view these links:

Season of Sculpture, Season VII presents “Shared Ground: Eight Artists-Eighteen Installations” by Pamela Beck

This year, Season of Sculpture presents Season VII’s “Shared Ground: Eight Artists, Eighteen Installations.” Eight highly acclaimed artists of regional, national and international renown, will exhibit eighteen large-scale works throughout Sarasota’s beautiful downtown Bayfront Park from November 16, 2013 through May 2014.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.

Many of us have memories of climbing over outdoor sculpture as children; we were free to explore and react to the look, sense and impact of a work of art in its ever-changing natural surroundings. Free from the encumbrances of traditional indoor settings, we experienced art in a fresh and approachable way; sometimes serious, sometimes playful, but always visceral and untethered from rules of art protocol and gallery decorum.

If we were lucky, this was our introduction to sculpture- to be fully engaged, curious and physically interactive without restrictions; and this is exactly the opportunity Season of Sculpture offers to newcomers and established fans alike over the course of the next six months.

Season of Sculpture is a local not for profit, 5O1 [c] 3 organization that produces a biennial, international exhibition of large-scale sculptures along Sarasota’s bay front. It’s free and open to the public 24/7. Their mission is to enrich the cultural and educational experience of residents and visitors. The organization relies on donors, sponsors, volunteers and artists to bring these nationally acclaimed, international invitational exhibitions to Sarasota.

This year, Season of Sculpture presents Season VII’s “Shared Ground: Eight Artists, Eighteen Installations.” Eight highly acclaimed artists of regional, national and international renown, will exhibit eighteen large-scale works throughout Sarasota’s beautiful downtown Bayfront Park from November 16, 2013 through May 2014.

“Shared Ground,” curated by Fayanne Hayes and Andrew Maass, presents sculpture by Heinz Aeschlimann, Hans Van de Bovenkamp, Robert Chambers, Richard Herzog, Linda Howard, Jun Kaneko, Jae-Hyo Lee, and Boaz Vaadia. Docent-led tours will be offered, as well as public and student educational programs.

A satellite exhibition of the artists’ smaller works will be exhibited at the Sarasota Herald-Tribune building at 1741 Main Street in downtown Sarasota from January 7th through May 3Oth, 2014.
As the director of public relations for Season of Sculpture, I’ve had the opportunity to ask the artists about their work. A series of brief interviews with them will appear in this column, starting with Boaz Vaadia.

2OO8 Bronze, boulder & bluestone 86"h. x 12O"w. x 8O" d. A/P, Ed. of 5
Asa, & Yeshoshafat with Dog, 2OO8
Bronze, boulder & bluestone
86″h. x 12O”w. x 8O” d.
A/P, Ed. of 5

 

2O13 Bronze & bluestone 91"h. x 36" w. x 36" d. 2/5, Ed. of 5
David, 2O13
Bronze & bluestone
91″h. x 36″ w. x 36″ d.
2/5, Ed. of 5

Boaz Vaadia Bio:

Vaadia was born in Gat Rimon, Israel in 1951; He was a self-taught artist until he could afford to attend the Avai Institute of Fine Arts, from which he graduated in 1971. He taught himself welding and stone masonry and built his first casting foundry for bronze following his graduation.

In 1975, he was awarded his first, of two, American-Israel Cultural Foundation grants to study in the US, where he has lived and worked ever since, in New York City.

Vaadia’s unique sculptures, either in bronze or stacked bluestone slate, evoke his Israeli heritage in a meditative, contemporary, yet sensual style. His work is permanently sited in numerous public collections, as well as museums and private collections throughout the U.S. including: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Museum; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; the Time Warner Center, NYC; The Ravinia Sculpture Park, Chicago; the Independence Park, Tel Aviv; and The Philharmonic Center for the Arts, Naples, FL.

PB: How long did you think about this sculpture before working on it?
BV: Most of my sculptures take several years of thought and study before I begin carving.

PB: Who/what are some of your influences, artistically or otherwise?
BV: Mainly ancient stonework, but also sculptors like Michelangelo, Noguchi, and Giacometti.

2OO9 Bronze, boulder, & bluestone 76" h. x 12O" w. x 1OO " d. 1/5, Ed. of 5
Family with Dog, 2OO9
Bronze, boulder, & bluestone
76″ h. x 12O” w. x 1OO ” d.
1/5, Ed. of 5

PB: How do you anticipate that your sculpture will look different in the bay front setting?
BV: As my work is layered I believe it will connect well with the environment, looking as though carved by winds from the bay.

PB: What made you choose to do a work of this size?
BV: My work is based on the human scale, allowing viewers to interact with it in a more personal way. The natural materials I work with also help determine the size of my work.

PB: What is your favorite hobby or pastime other than your art?
BV: Meditation and spiritual studies.

2O13 Bronze, basalt & bluestone 65"h. x 9O"w. x 8O" d.
Maaka & Revaham, 2O13
Bronze, basalt & bluestone
65″h. x 9O”w. x 8O” d.

website:
http://sarasotaseasonofsculpture.org/

Contact:
SusanMcleod@michaelsaunders.com

Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela is Public Relations Director for Season of Sculpture and a private art consultant. She co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings, drawings and sculpture at Sotheby’s. She was Communications Director for The Essential Element. Pamela has a keen interest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old. Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee and Institute for the Ages Volunteer.

“Could an Artist Have Anything in Common with A-Rod?” by Pamela Beck

What if Artists took Steroids? Join Pamela Beck in her column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.

Recently I read a provocative article inspired by the deluge of baseball-steroid shenanigans entitled: “What if Novelists Took Steroids?”*

Alex Rodriguez bats in a game on April 19, 2008 courtesy of Keith Allison.
Alex Rodriguez bats in a game on April 19, 2008 courtesy of Keith Allison.

The writer wonders would he, too, indulge if the results were superpower skills that allowed him to leap to the best-seller list faster than a speeding bullet?  If his stories could flow like water and his fingers could grow extra-muscular to better attack the keyboard with stamina and zeal—would he be able to resist the temptation to pop that pill?

While this falls in to the category of “What I’ll Do When I Win the 45O Million Dollar Powerball,” you have to admit that the pill-popping question intrigues and makes you silently consider your ethical stance.

Le Penseur, (The Thinker), Auguste Rodin (1840-1917)
Le Penseur, (The Thinker), Auguste Rodin (1840-1917)

As an artist, the consequences could be extraordinary.  What if by taking such a pill, original ideas would frequently appear to you along with the technical mastery to produce them?  What if the results would be met with international acclaim? What if there was a shortcut to creating satisfying work and your motivated hands would work forcefully and successfully to paint, sculpt, or fabricate the best ideas you’ve ever come up with?  Would you be able to resist the temptation for that new little chaser with your morning coffee?  You could take that pill secretly.

It’s hard to say if you’d develop affection for a fantasy capsule that’s accompanied by a solo show of your work at the Guggenheim Museum.  The writer of the article cited says, “Cheaters always know how it’s going to end. That’s why they become liars too.”

What hand would you play…if no one were watching?

Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings at Sotheby’s. Perhaps it’s not surprising that she is also a psychotherapist. She has a keen interest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old. Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee and Institute for the Ages Volunteer.

*http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/11/opinion/sunday/what-if-novelists-took-steroids.html?_r=0

ArtDart: On the Waterfront by Pamela Beck

There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in the second installment of, SeeSaw, to her current column, ARTdart, as she observes and explores various visual art exhibitions and happenings in the Gulf Coast area.

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in the second installment of, SeeSaw, to her current column, ARTdart, as she observes and explores various visual art exhibitions and happenings in the Gulf Coast area.

“My most successful relationship has been with water,” a newly single artist recently told me.
I laughed.
“I know that sounds funny, “ he continued, “but we’ve been together forever and it’s the only influence I’ll let dominate me; or at least the only one I’ll admit to,” he added with a devilish smile.
That’s what makes horse races; but seriously, nobody with a beating heart can live in Sarasota and not be affected by the pervasive presence of water.
In the conversations I have with local artists, water is often mentioned as a favorite muse. Whether referenced for its beauty, power, mystery or ever-changing properties, water leaves an indelible mark.
Here’s a sampler of what I SeeSaw around town:

 

Susan Zukowsky
Missing Girl, 2OO3
Mixed media collage: appropriated paper images, rubber ball, wire, glass beads, thread
2O 1/2 x 18 1/2 inches
Jack Dowd’s 27 & Susan Zukowsky
Selby Gallery, Sarasota FL, 34234

Bruce Marsh
Bay Light
Oil on canvas
60 x 65 inches

Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art
1288 N. Palm Ave.
Sarasota, FL 34236

 

 
Irene Gorman
Sarasota Journal
Collage

Florida Flavor
Art Center Sarasota
707 North Tamiami Trail
Sarasota, FL 34236

 

Arnold Desamarais
The Quiet Calm
oil on panel, 2011
18 x 24 inches

Stakenborg Fine Art
1545 Main Street
Sarasota, Fl. 34239
 
Maro Lorimer Old Florida acrylic on gallery wrapped canvas 36 x 24 inches
Maro Lorimer
Old Florida
acrylic on canvas
36 x 24 inches

Art Uptown
1367 Main St
Sarasota, FL 34236
 
 
 

Beatrice del Perugia
Siesta Gold
acrylic on canvas
18″ x 18″, framed 22″ x 22″

Dabbert Gallery
76 S. Palm Ave.
Sarasota, FL 34236

 

 
 
Sigrid Olsen
Marina Magic
mixed media
14 x 17 inches framed

Sigrid Olsen Art
4O7 S. Pineapple Ave.
Sarasota, FL, 34236

 

Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings at Sotheby’s. Perhaps it’s not surprising that she is also a psychotherapist. She has a keen interest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old. Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee and Institute for the Ages Volunteer.

“American Moderns, 1910-1960: From O’Keeffe to Rockwell at The Ringling” by Pamela Beck

If you weren’t one of the 900 or so revelers at The Ringling for the recent opening of “American Moderns, 1910-1960: From O’Keeffe to Rockwell,” when was the last time you saw an exhibition including paintings by Georgia O’Keeffe, Marsden Hartley, Arthur Dove, Milton Avery, Stuart Davis, Joseph Stella and Norman Rockwell in the same show?

ARTdart: There are as many ways to think about art as there are to create it. Join Pamela Beck in her column, ARTdart, as she explores and considers the different perspectives that define the art world.

If you weren’t one of the 900 or so revelers at The Ringling for the recent opening of  “American Moderns, 1910-1960: From O’Keeffe to Rockwell,” when was the last time you saw an exhibition including paintings by Georgia O’Keeffe, Marsden Hartley, Arthur Dove, Milton Avery, Stuart Davis, Joseph Stella and Norman Rockwell in the same show?

Marsden Hartley (American, 1877-1943). Handsome Drinks, 1916. Oil on composition board, 24 x 20 in. (61 x 50.8 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Milton Lowenthal, 72.3
Marsden Hartley (American, 1877-1943). Handsome Drinks, 1916. Oil on composition board, 24 x 20 in. (61 x 50.8 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Milton Lowenthal, 72.3

These paintings and works by other artists (57 artworks in total) comprise this traveling exhibition organized and co- curated by the Brooklyn Museum from their permanent collection.

Joseph Stella (American, born Italy, 1877-1946). The Virgin, 1926. Oil on canvas, 39 11-16 x 38 3-4 in. (100.8 x 98.4 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Adolph Lewisohn, 28.207
Joseph Stella (American, born Italy, 1877-1946). The Virgin, 1926. Oil on canvas, 39 11-16 x 38 3-4 in. (100.8 x 98.4 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Adolph Lewisohn, 28.207

Steven High, executive director of The Ringling, describes this time period in our country covered in the show as follows: “Between 1910 and 1960, both American society and art underwent tumultuous and far-reaching transformations. The United States emerged as an international power of economic industrial and military might, while also experiencing two world wars and the Great Depression.”

Max Weber (American, born Russia, 1881-1961). Abraham Walkowitz, 1907. Oil on canvas, 25 1-4 x 20 1-4 in. (64.1 x 51.4 cm), Framed- 30 1-2 x 25 1-2 in. (77.5 x 64.8 cm), Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Abraham Walkowitz, 44.65
Max Weber (American, born Russia, 1881-1961). Abraham Walkowitz, 1907. Oil on canvas, 25 1-4 x 20 1-4 in. (64.1 x 51.4 cm), Framed- 30 1-2 x 25 1-2 in. (77.5 x 64.8 cm), Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Abraham Walkowitz, 44.65

Mindful of the impact these enormous societal, cultural and economic changes had on artists during this particular time in history, the exhibition is divided into six themes:

Cubist Experiments

The Still Life Revisited

Nature Essentialized

Modern Structures

Engaging Characters

Americana

As a result, a broad variety of subject matter and styles can be contemplated and seen on a walk through the Searing Wing. For example, art depicting America’s urbanization and industrialization is displayed, as are reactions to these modern changes—seen in paintings of organic natural beauty. 2Oth century American artists’ responses to European cubism are on view, as are more traditional artworks reflecting American self-definition and identity.

The useful and beautifully illustrated catalogue reinforces this overview and is a wonderful companion to the exhibition. It parallels the curators’ choice to present the multi-faceted American Modern artist sensibility through thought provoking thematic commonalities and contrasts rather than dry chronological order.

Matthew McLendon, The Ringling’s curator of modern and contemporary art says what excites him about this exhibition is “seeing, in a very condensed way, the enormous amount of innovation, evolution and productivity in the American art scene during this time.”

This is a diverse group of artists. And while it’s wonderful to see “old friends” exhibited together, the inclusion of work by unfamiliar or lesser-known artists adds a welcome element of surprise.

George Copeland Ault (American, 1891-1948). Manhattan Mosaic, 1947. Oil on canvas, 31 7-8 x 18 in. (81 x 45.7 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Dick S. Ramsay Fund, 66.127
George Copeland Ault (American, 1891-1948). Manhattan Mosaic, 1947. Oil on canvas, 31 7-8 x 18 in. (81 x 45.7 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Dick S. Ramsay Fund, 66.127

But the old favorites don’t disappoint. From the exuberant splashes of bold color, controlled energy and hard-edged shapes of Stuart Davis, and the powerfully charged, course canvases of intense color and simple forms of Marsden Hartley (which somehow always feel like self-portraits whether they’re of a bird or a glass), to the up-close-and-personal Georgia O’Keefe—you’ll recognize the work of many artists from across a crowded room. (This speaks volumes about the personal “thumbprint” of every artist.)

 

Marsden Hartley (American, 1877-1943). Summer Clouds and Flowers, 1942. Oil on fabricated board, 22 x 28 in. (55.9 x 71.1 cm). © Estate of Marsden Hartley, Yale University
Marsden Hartley (American, 1877-1943). Summer Clouds and Flowers, 1942. Oil on fabricated board, 22 x 28 in. (55.9 x 71.1 cm). © Estate of Marsden Hartley, Yale University

For O’Keeffe fans, the inclusion of two unusual choices is interesting to note:  “Green, Yellow and Orange,” a completely abstract painting, and “Fishhook from Hawaii,” a wonderful work with imagery created for a Dole Pineapple Company ad campaign which O’Keeffe worked on (while experiencing financial hardship during the Great Depression). The telescoping effect created by the loops of wire, and the oversized feathery fish lure, play beautifully with space, color and optical illusion (not illustrated here).

Georgia O'Keeffe (American, 1887-1986). Green, Yellow and Orange, 1960. Oil on canvas, 40 x 30 in. (101.6 x 76.2 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Bequest of Georgia O'Keeffe, 87.136.3
Georgia O’Keeffe (American, 1887-1986). Green, Yellow and Orange, 1960. Oil on canvas, 40 x 30 in. (101.6 x 76.2 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Bequest of Georgia O’Keeffe, 87.136.3

We’re fortunate The Ringling has brought in an exhibition to expose viewers to a period of American art not substantially represented in the museum’s permanent collection.

It’s all the more impressive that this exciting show takes place during our supposedly “slow” Sarasota summer months, yet had the biggest turnout on a members’ opening night in The Ringling’s history.

When you see the exhibition yourself, you’ll know why.

 

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

“American Moderns, 1910-1960: From O’Keeffe to Rockwell”

June 14- Sept. 8, 2013

5401 Bay Shore Rd.

Sarasota

941 359-5700

www.ringling.org

 

American Moderns, 1910-1960: From O’Keeffe to Rockwell, has been organized by the Brooklyn Museum

Pamela Beck
Pamela Beck

Pamela co-owned Pannonia Galleries in NYC. There she was also an art appraiser, private art dealer, art fair exhibitor and catalogued paintings at Sotheby’s. Perhaps it’s not surprising that she is also a psychotherapist. She has a keen interest in the arts and supporting Sarasota’s future as a lively, diverse and forward thinking city for young and old. Pamela is a member of The Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, Curatorial & Acquisitions Committee and Institute for the Ages Volunteer.